Nathan L Webb’s Answers

Nathan L Webb

Seattle DUI / DWI Attorney.

Contributor Level 9
  1. Driver license suspended in GA, need to get them reinstated in WA

    Answered over 5 years ago.

    1. Nathan L Webb
    2. James C Forslund
    2 lawyer answers

    First, you need to try and obtain a license in Washington since DOL did not impose these conditions, GA did. However, be aware that there is an interstate compact agreement which most states adhere to, i.e. if you were suspended in GA, then you will probably be denied here in WA, but it doesn't hurt to try. If you are denied here in WA, then you should contact a GA attorney familiar with the DDS for assistance.

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  2. Arrest record

    Answered over 5 years ago.

    1. Kurt Edward Boehl
    2. Aaron S Kiviat
    3. Nathan L Webb
    3 lawyer answers

    Unfortunately, a DUI conviction will remain on your record forever; however, from your question it appears that your DUI has not been adjudicated fully. If your DUI is reduced to a lesser criminal offense then for sentencing purposes it will affect you for seven years. If your DUI is dismissed, you can move to have that non-conviction data removed from the court's record. Caveat: the WSP, prosecutor's and judges will always refer to your record, even if it didn't result in a conviction at all.

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  3. Revocation of Drivers License in another state ( GA )

    Answered over 5 years ago.

    1. Nathan L Webb
    2. Jason Matthew Mayberry
    2 lawyer answers

    Well, the easy answer first: just try to go to DOL and apply for a license. If you are denied, then in all likelihood you will have to comply with the terms the Dept. fo Driver's Services set out in GA. If you are unable to obtain a license, you may find it necessary to consult with an attorney in GA who is familiary with driver's services to assist you.

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  4. DUI on H1B - US Re-entry Question

    Answered over 5 years ago.

    1. Jonathan David Rands
    2. Nathan L Webb
    2 lawyer answers

    Typically the US won't deny an individual entry into the country based upon a DUI conviction solely. Mr. Rands is correct in that you need to check your application and Visa itself with respect to revocation due to criminal convictions. In all likelihood, as long as this is your only conviction, you will not be precluded from travel outside of the country while on probation.

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  5. Dui and driving on suspended

    Answered over 5 years ago.

    1. Nathan L Webb
    2. Lawrence Neil Rogak
    3. Daniel Martin Jaffe
    3 lawyer answers

    Unfortunately it appears as if you are having communication problems with probation and the court. You are correct to ask this question to a bunch of lawyers, but it is highly advised that you retain one of them to assist you with this matter. Unrepresented, or "pro se," individuals are always at a disadvantage when dealing with the court system and probation. My advice is to obtain competent counsel.

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  6. UK HSMP Work Permit on US DUI

    Answered over 5 years ago.

    1. Nathan L Webb
    2. Gilles Raphael Abitbol
    2 lawyer answers

    You must answer yes to the question posed as the question doesn't differentiate between felony and misdemeanor convictions. For the purposes of the form a criminal offense is what you were convicted of, that is, a gross misdemeanor. I cannot advise on teh UK HSMP work permit and don't know if they would check here in the US, I would suggest you contact a barrister in the UK to discuss that matter.

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  7. Sobriety tests

    Answered almost 7 years ago.

    1. Nathan L Webb
    2. Jonathan Dichter
    3. Nicholas William Juhl
    4. Garth D O'Brien
    5. William C. Head
    5 lawyer answers

    In Washington State, the government can attempt to prove DUI by satisfying one of two prongs under the DUI statute. Under one prong, called the per se prong, the government has to prove beyond all reasonable doubt that an individual operated a motor vehicle in the state and that within two hours of driving had an alcohol concentration of .08 or higher. The other prong, which would apply to this scenario, requires that the government prove that the individual operated a motor vehicle...

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  8. DUI on my own property

    Answered almost 7 years ago.

    1. Nathan L Webb
    2. Henry Lebensbaum
    3. Jonathan Burton Blecher
    3 lawyer answers

    The DUI statute in Washington is clear that you must drive a vehicle "within this state" to be charged with DUI; however, operating a vehicle on your property, even while intoxicated, has been adjudicated and there is precedent on the matter. The situation would really depend upon the circumstances of your case, for instance, were you near a public road or did you have immediate access to a roadway. This scenario would require discussion and analysis of the facts, but there have been...

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  9. DUI versus open container laws

    Answered almost 7 years ago.

    1. Nathan L Webb
    2. Okorie Okorocha
    3. Alexander Thomas Henderson
    3 lawyer answers

    Possessing an open container of alcohol is simply a civil infraction in the state of Washington. Simply having an open container of alcohol in your vehicle would be an arguably insufficient basis for a Driving Under the Influence arrest. Caveat: You can be charged with DUI by just admitting to drinking in Washington State. Troopers, officers and deputies often arrest persons based solely upon admissions to consuming alcohol or by just observing the odor of alcohol and they exercise great...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  10. Neg 1 and flying into Canada

    Answered almost 5 years ago.

    1. Linda Medeiros Callahan
    2. Mark C Blair
    3. Nathan L Webb
    4. John M. Kaman
    4 lawyer answers

    The simpliest answer is that it will be a discretionary decision by the border agent. Although a Neg 1 doesn't specifcally prevent your entry into Canada, it would be up to the individual agent to make the decision regarding entry. Just keep in mind, you could be denied entry, so make plans ahead of time in case that happens.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

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