Justin C. Lowenthal’s Guides

Justin C. Lowenthal

Davis Business Attorney.

Contributor Level 14
  1. Buying a Restaurant: Key Legal Issues to Consider

    Written by attorney Justin Lowenthal, 7 months ago.

    Buying a restaurant is often thought of as a less risky option than starting your own restaurant business from the ground up. However, without proper research, due diligence, and consideration for the essential legal steps and potential liabilities involved, it can be even more r...

  2. Things to Consider when Entering Agreements to Form Legal Entities

    Written by attorney Justin Lowenthal, 8 months ago.

    In early-stage start-ups, individual entrepreneurs and investors will often enter agreements, by way of letter of intent, memorandum of understanding, or preincorporation contract, to form a business entity for their new enterprise. The following represents a list of some of the ...

  3. Ten Tips for Any New Start-Up

    Written by attorney Justin Lowenthal, 8 months ago.

    While I have only been a business lawyer for (just about) 3 years, there are fundamental legal mistakes that I've seen numerous start-ups repeatedly make. For that reason, I have put together the following Ten Tips for Any New Start-up. 1.Form a corporation - not an LLC or...

    2 people found this Legal Guide helpful

  4. Changes to Business Entity Filing Requirements Effective 1/1/13

    Written by attorney Justin Lowenthal, over 1 year ago.

    As of January 1, 2013, new legal requirements apply to business entity documents filed with the California Secretary of State's office.

    2 people found this Legal Guide helpful

  5. How to Use an Exit Interview to Protect Your Company's Proprietary Information

    Written by attorney Justin Lowenthal, over 1 year ago.

    In order to be entitled to protection of your company's trade secrets and confidential proprietary information, your company must be able to demonstrate that it took reasonable measures to ensure the secrecy of the information that the company seeks to protect. Using a confidenti...

    1 person found this Legal Guide helpful

  6. Am I an "At-Will" Employee?

    Written by attorney Justin Lowenthal, over 1 year ago.

    In the absence of a written or oral agreement for employment for a specified term (e.g., 2 years) or employment terminable only for specific causes, an employee's employment is presumed to be terminable at the will of the employee or the employer: "An employment, having no specif...

    2 people found this Legal Guide helpful

  7. Unpaid Internships 101: California Unpaid Internship Standards and Regulations

    Written by attorney Justin Lowenthal, over 1 year ago.

    There is no state statute or regulation in California which expressly exempts persons participating in an internship from the minimum wage and overtime requirements. Federal regulation provides that those who employ, meaning suffer or permit to work, must compensate workers for t...

    2 people found this Legal Guide helpful

  8. Do I Need a Lawyer to Form an LLC in California?

    Written by attorney Justin Lowenthal, over 1 year ago.

    The answer is, "no". You can form your own limited liability company in California by filing articles of organization (Form LLC-1) with the Secretary of State. The LLC-1 form is a simple document which contains merely basic information - the (proposed) name of the LLC, the purpos...

    2 people found this Legal Guide helpful

  9. What "Suspended" Status Means for a Corporation

    Written by attorney Justin Lowenthal, over 1 year ago.

    Only the Franchise Tax Board and Secretary of State can suspend a corporation's business status. Typically, the FTB suspends a corporation for failing to file one or more tax returns. The SOS may suspend a corporation for failure to pay the business' balance due, which may includ...

    1 person found this Legal Guide helpful

  10. A General Partnership's Use of a Fictitious Business Name

    Written by attorney Justin Lowenthal, over 1 year ago.

    A general partnership must register a "Fictitious Business Name Statement" (d.b.a. or doing business as) with the county clerk of the county of the partnership's principal place of business. Fictitious business names are not filed with the Secretary of States Office, and filing ...

    3 people found this Legal Guide helpful