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Ramona Rae Hallam

Ramona Hallam’s Answers

16 total


  • In California, my 25 yr old son got in car accident (his fault). Insurance couldn't cover everything. Now atty threatening me.

    So I get a letter from the insurance company threatening me. I may have been on the title of the vehicle but I was nowhere near the accident. Can they go after me? If so for how much and under what theory? The car was insured, I guess the amount ...

    Ramona’s Answer

    All of the above responses are correct. You should definitely telephone the insurance company immediately.

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  • If you are sued in CA limited civil court for less than the max ($25,000), can a judge rule for punitive/legal in excess of 25k?

    Thanks.

    Ramona’s Answer

    I concur with my esteemed colleague's response.

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  • I have a warrant can I avoid jail time? This is in Wyoming. It is from unpaid fines from a DUI charge two yrs ago.

    I currently have an arrest warrant out for unpaid fines egualing 510.00 if I were to pay this bond in full could I possibly avoid jail time? What can I do to fix this? I no longer live in the state where warant was issues (the judge knows this) an...

    Ramona’s Answer

    If this is a San Diego California warrant you can likely have an attorney appear for you and ask the court to recall the warrant. There must be another reason for the warrant if it is an arrest warrant rather than a bench warrant. Maybe you missed classes, violated probation, etc. You should have someone look into it more. If it is not serious, an attorney can likely appear without you in court and clear the matter up.

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  • CA palo alto dui, blew .08 on the field, .07 at the station. suggestions to what i say in court?

    recieved a dui at the end of december..blew a .08 on the field, .07 at the station. police said i may not be charged for anything, but found out a few days ago that the district attorney charged me for both under the influence and over the limit. ...

    Ramona’s Answer

    It sounds like you may have a probable cause motion. If the police do not have probable cause to stop you, the court may suppress the stop. Should they do so, all evidence seized thereafter may be suppressed. The outcome will depend upon when you turned on your lights, where the officer was when he saw you, and whether you can prove your theory of the case.
    An experienced DUI attorney can advise you. Call for a free consultation if you'd like.

    This answer is provided for informational purposes only, is not intended to create, nor does it create any further duty to respond. No attorney/client relationship is formed by response to this question, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the attorney.Actual legal advice can only be provided in an office consultation by an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction, with experience in the area of law in which your concern lies.

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  • Considering hiring a lawyer for a DUI back in Dec 2008 that didn't get filed until July of 2009. No plea or appearance yet

    I appeard on my original court date on the citation, but normal charges were made at that time. I haven't received anything in the mail until last Friday from the CA DMV status my license will be suspended oo 3/27 if I don't appear in court. Bec...

    Ramona’s Answer

    You should definitely appear. First, something is fishy with the DMV stating that they will suspend your license if you do not appear in court. They usually are not the people who notify you of a court date. Despite never having received notice, you should call the DMV to see what they are up to and call the courts to see what the District Attorney is up to. It seems that action may have been taken without your knowledge and that this is not the first hearing.
    I strongly advise an attorney.

    This answer is provided for informational purposes only, is not intended to create, nor does it create any further duty to respond. No attorney/client relationship is formed by response to this question, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the attorney.Actual legal advice can only be provided in an office consultation by an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction, with experience in the area of law in which your concern lies.

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  • Time limits for a court to adjudicate a case.

    Is there a general timeframe (and where is it listed) that a family law court must have a case adjudicated by? P.S.: For those of you wanting to take a shot at me and say I need counseling or something, please just refrain from answering any of...

    Ramona’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    It is difficult in family law cases to pin down the end of a case where all issues are adjudicated. In addition to the parties themselves raising issues constantly, the court has continuing jurisdiction over the matters. Thus, even if you obtain a final adjudication, often it is not final. For instance, if there is a court order granting spousal support, but there is non-compliance by one spouse or the other (in not paying, or not looking for work while receiving), an order to show case brings that matter before the court again. The only sure-fire way to divest the court of jurisdiction is to resolve every little thing in such a way as to terminate the court's jurisdiction over the matter. In a spousal support issue, that might mean making a trade of money or property in lieu of spousal support. Then be sure the money or property is produced to the other party.
    Naturally, this is more difficult when it comes to a couple having children as the court has continuing jurisdiction into perpetuity (age 18). This is the trade you make for legal marriage, as opposed to informal ceremonies with a witch doctor or some other such thing. Even in an informal "marriage," the court becomes involved when one or the other attempts to prove parental rights and child support rights.
    In short, the court needn't adjudicate endlessly. The parties usually cause it to happen by not resolving things quickly. In other cases, adjudication is often the result of court orders in place that need to be enforced. And then in other cases, jurisdiction never ends and the matter may open to change where one party or another pushes for change.
    Good luck ending it.

    This answer is provided for informational purposes only, is not intended to create, nor does it create any further duty to respond. No attorney/client relationship is formed by response to this question, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the attorney.Actual legal advice can only be provided in an office consultation by an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction, with experience in the area of law in which your concern lies.

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  • I have a question regarding age discrimination

    I have been with my employer for 8 years.Exemplary work evaluations and flawless work history.I am an assistant manager for a nationwide retail co.I have applied for store manager 8 times in the last 4 years and have been passed over in every stor...

    Ramona’s Answer

    To file under FEHA you must belong to a protected class (i.e., over forty (40) years of age), you were subjected to an adverse employment action (like termination, demotion, suspension), and that similarly situated employees (others outside the protected class) were treated differently and more favorably.
    You may also raise an inference of discrimination using statistical evidence, comparative evidence, or direct evidence. Direct evidence is the most persuasive, such as discriminatory comments. In larger companies, statistical analysis is often used to demonstrate that the employer systematically discriminates against a particular type of person in hiring, terminations, and promotions. You should seek an attorney swiftly as the statute of limitations is not long.

    This answer is provided for informational purposes only, is not intended to create, nor does it create any further duty to respond. No attorney/client relationship is formed by response to this question, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the attorney.Actual legal advice can only be provided in an office consultation by an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction, with experience in the area of law in which your concern lies.

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  • A judgment was made for overpayment. They applied Plus Filing Fees and other court fees. Can I pay what I originally owed still?

    They added 205.00 and other court fees of 25.00. I originally owed 364.60. I received the notice on 2-10-10 and the document is dated 1-28-10. With the fees, now I owe 594.60. If I talk to EDD, is there a chance still that I can just pay 364.60?

    Ramona’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    Most things in life are negotiable. There is a chance they will waive fees, but on such a small amount, they may decide to accept payments on the amount due. It never hurts to simply call the judgment creditor to ask for a break.

    This answer is provided for informational purposes only, is not intended to create, nor does it create any further duty to respond. No attorney/client relationship is formed by response to this question, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the attorney.Actual legal advice can only be provided in an office consultation by an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction, with experience in the area of law in which your concern lies.

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  • Received a criminal subpoena, the persons charge is 69. What is Charge: 69?

    What is a criminal charge 69?

    Ramona’s Answer

    If it is Penal Code 69 it is:

    Resisting Executive Officers

    Every person who attempts, by means of any threat or violence, to deter or prevent an executive officer from per-forming any duty imposed upon such officer by law, or who knowingly resists, by the use of force or violence, such officer, in the performance of his duty, is punishable by a fine not exceeding ten thousand dollars ($10,000), or by im-prisonment in the state prison, or in a county jail not exceeding one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

    You should seek legal counsel as this is a serious charge that could impact your entire life.
    Feel free to call me.

    This answer is provided for informational purposes only, is not intended to create, nor does it create any further duty to respond or an attorney/client relationship. No attorney/client relationship is formed by response to this question, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the attorney.Actual legal advice can only be provided in an office consultation by an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction, with experience in the area of law in which your concern lies.

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  • I am in the process of settling an injury through an insurance comp.They would like my SS# am i required to provide this to them

    I would like to know if i have to report this to IRS. I would also like to know if i am required to give my SS# to them.

    Ramona’s Answer

    I concur with both answering attorneys. They have no right to your social security number.

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