Richard Timothy Jones’s Guides

Richard Timothy Jones

Austin Criminal Defense Attorney.

Contributor Level 17
  1. Ignition interlock in Texas

    Written by attorney Richard Jones, almost 2 years ago.

    Ignition interlock on probation and bond Code of Criminal Procedure Article 42.12 13(i) states when an ignition interlock may be required as a condition of DWI or other Chapter 49 offense probations. Under standard conditions the defendant may be required to install, maintain, a...

  2. Police polygraphs

    Written by attorney Richard Jones, almost 2 years ago.

    Polygraphs continue to be a tool used by the police. A recent ordinance in San Marcos, Texas authorized the police to transfer funds from their asset forfeiture fund to purchase polygraph machines and training. This occurred despite polygraphs not being allowed in court. Why then...

  3. How much time does a person charged with their first DWI serve?

    Written by attorney Richard Jones, about 3 years ago.

    A first time DWI is punishable by up to 180 days in jail.depends on whether or not a collision was involved. If there was a collision and no one was hurt the prosecutors are going to want restitution for any damages. If the person charged has insurance then that restitution is us...

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  4. What are some common probation mistakes?

    Written by attorney Richard Jones, about 3 years ago.

    One of the most common mistakes is missing a meeting with your probation officer. No one likes to wait and worry about missing work. It is a good idea to remember that if you miss too many meetings you're going to be in line to get a job working in the prison kitchen. Another com...

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  5. Can you be convicted of DUI if you blow less than .08?

    Written by attorney Richard Jones, about 3 years ago.

    Yes. The .08 standard is just one measure of intoxication. You could be legally impaired if you mixed drugs and alcohol. Your blood alcohol concentration could be less than .08 but because of the combination you may have lost the normal use of your faculties. The prosecution woul...

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  6. What happens after the punishment phase of a jury trial?

    Written by attorney Richard Jones, about 3 years ago.

    Once the punishment phase is over the person charged will have thirty days to file a motion for new trial. Most of the time the motion will not be granted but occasionally the judge will change their mind on some previous ruling. The defendant will also need to file a notice of a...

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  7. Can I be made to go to court on a religious holiday?

    Written by attorney Richard Jones, about 3 years ago.

    If you are a member of an organized religion then the law says you are entitled to a continuance on a religious holiday. Your attorney would need to file a notarized statement that specifies the religion and the holiday. Claiming to be a church of "one", in other words creating y...

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  8. Can any lawyer represent someone at a parole revocation hearing?

    Written by attorney Richard Jones, about 3 years ago.

    Yes. However, parole revocation hearings are different from regular criminal proceedings. For example in preliminary parole revocation hearings, the rules of evidence don't apply. It is usually better for the parolee not to testify so as to not let the parole division know what t...

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  9. Texas Parole Hearings - Waiver

    Written by attorney Richard Jones, about 3 years ago.

    Should someone waive their parole revocation hearing? Parolees should never waive their revocation hearing. For those a

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  10. Trial procedure (the state's case)

    Written by attorney Richard Jones, about 3 years ago.

    After jury selection it's time for the trial to start. First, the state will read the charges. The defendant and their attorney will stand. After the prosecutor finishes, the judge will ask how the defendant pleads. The defendant will say "Not Guilty". The defendant and their att...

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