Michael F. Brown’s Answers

Michael F. Brown

Neenah Litigation Lawyer.

Contributor Level 12
  1. I am looking to have a former employer take my name, tour portfolio, and likeness off of his site.

    Answered about 1 month ago.

    1. Bryan William Bockhop
    2. Michael F. Brown
    3. Floyd Edwin Ivey
    4. Frank A. Natoli
    4 lawyer answers

    I agree with my colleague that simply asking the former employer to take down the info (if you haven't done so), politely, is a good first step. If the employer does not comply, you should consult with an attorney who practices in intellectual property (IP) law and in State laws that may also apply to this scenario. Assuming both the employer and you are located in GA, you would want an IP attorney who is also familiar with GA laws concerning invasion of privacy. In my State of WI, there is a...

    8 lawyers agreed with this answer

  2. I am currently a teacher in Wisconsin and have been convicted of my first DUI, can I be fired or lose license

    Answered 2 months ago.

    1. Tajara Dommershausen
    2. Michael F. Brown
    3. Charles K. Kenyon Jr.
    4. Michael C. Witt
    5. Jay K. Nixon
    6. ···
    6 lawyer answers

    I agree with the attorneys encouraging you to review policy and contract language for any duty to disclose the DUI to your employer. If that documentation DOES reference such a duty, I think before disclosing you should promptly consult with a WI employee rights attorney. It would be a delicate issue to manage and an attorney could help you plan and reduce risk. While the concept of employment-at-will is a factor for many WI workers, you should not assume from that concept that you'd have...

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

  3. What would be my next step

    Answered 2 months ago.

    1. Michael F. Brown
    2. Joseph Albin Larson
    3. Peter J. Carman
    4. Israel Ramon
    5. Adam Matthew Kent
    5 lawyer answers

    You should consult with a WI-based attorney who practices in workers comp and discrimination law. Such an attorney could evaluate your situation in detail, and could advise whether there are potential legal rights and options worth pursuing. It's quite possible you would have options worth considering. But it sounds like a delicate and time-sensitive situation, and to make sure you handle it appropriately you should really seek the guidance of an attorney.

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

  4. Extortion Lawyer

    Answered about 1 month ago.

    1. David Evan Keystone
    2. Michael Charles Doland
    3. Michael F. Brown
    3 lawyer answers

    It's unclear what your message or question (?) is about. Your message is tagged with sexual harassment and workplace harassment. If you were subject to sexual harassment -- or accused of it-- in either event you should consult directly with an employment attorney and discuss the details. Only through such consultation could you learn of legal rights and options, if any. You can find a listing of employment attorneys at this Avvo site (via "Find a Lawyer" tab).

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

  5. Employment discrimination?

    Answered about 2 months ago.

    1. Michael F. Brown
    2. Merritt J Green
    2 lawyer answers

    I'm sorry to hear those comments were made. From your question, I am assuming you yourself are African American (as well as the negative comments referring to African Americans). Assuming that's correct, it's very likely you'd have potentially viable claims under Federal and/or State discrimination laws. That type of overt racist comment is unusual, and could make for unusually strong proof in support of a claim. With that said, there are many other factors that would need to be reviewed,...

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

  6. When, in Wisconsin, did raising your voice in opinion to a co-worker be labeled workplace violence?

    Answered 2 months ago.

    1. Michael F. Brown
    2. Matthew J. Galvin
    2 lawyer answers

    It appears you are frustrated, understandably. But at this point goal #1 should be trying to secure unemployment benefits. If you have not yet had your phone interview with the WI unemployment office, please keep these things in mind: (1) do NOT defend or explain yourself; (2) DO listen carefully to each QUESTION you are asked; (3) DO answer that question with FACTS; (4) do NOT volunteer information you are not asked for. Most of what you mention above will NOT be information the...

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  7. Employer Suing for non compete agrement

    Answered almost 3 years ago.

    1. Frank Wei-Hong Chen
    2. Matthew Daniel Muller
    3. Michael F. Brown
    4. Mary Carmen Remigio Madrid-Crost
    5. Steven Mark Sweat
    6. ···
    7 lawyer answers

    When you were employed with company A had they underpaid your wages (e.g. benched you for periods without pay) and/or required you to pay visa fees? I ask because those scenarios are unfortunately common, and if they occurred, may give you bases for potential counterclaims. If you were in fact underpaid, please feel free to contact me, and I could speak with you at no cost about those potential wage-related claims and leveraging factors. When I work on an H-1B wage case, I work in conjunction...

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  8. Can the owners son of his company break into my desk drawer(that is locked) and take my work comp file to another location?

    Answered 2 months ago.

    1. Brett A. Borah
    2. Michael F. Brown
    3. Daniel W Epperly
    4. Scott Douglas Silberman
    4 lawyer answers

    You are definitely right to be concerned. One threshold issue: does the write-up say that your signing means (1) you AGREE with it or (2) that you acknowledge RECEIVING it (and that's it)? Most write-ups simply ask for #2, an acknowledgement of receipt. If that's the case, there'd be no harm in signing, as all you'd be saying is you received it. With regard to all the other issues you mention-- these are complex matters that conceivably involve workers comp law, retaliation law, pregnancy...

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

  9. I need an employment attorney

    Answered 14 days ago.

    1. Michael F. Brown
    2. Joseph Albin Larson
    3. Robert M. Mihelich
    3 lawyer answers

    You should promptly contact an employee rights attorney licensed in WI law. Many of us offer free phone consultations. There could be legal violations here worth pursuing, e.g. WI wage laws, Federal overtime laws, and/or contract-law rights. But an attorney would need to directly discuss many details before determining if there is a potential legal action worth pursuing. You could possibly have some strong legal rights, but it is a delicate matter to handle them properly and to avoid risks (...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  10. Does a sexual harassment case hold merit in this situation?

    Answered 2 months ago.

    1. Kristine S Karila
    2. Neil Pedersen
    3. Michael F. Brown
    4. Michael David Early
    5. Athina Karamanlis Powers
    5 lawyer answers

    Comply with the employer's requests. I respectfully, and strongly, disagree with the suggestion you try to correct the record. I deal with hundreds of employee scenarios and it far often makes things far worse when employees try to dispute punishment, try to get clarification to their record, etc. If you oppose the employer's decision in any way, or try to "explain" yourself when not asked, you'll dig the hole deeper than the hole they dug for you, which fortunately did not involve...

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