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Gregory Philip Bowes

Gregory Bowes’s Answers

411 total


  • Can I go out and work without my parents permission at age 16

    I am 16 years old girl , I really wants to go out to work , what if my parents still don't let me ? Can I still go out and work without there permission

    Gregory’s Answer

    Your parents have a great deal of power over you, because you are not yet 18.
    Even if your parents agree to let you work, you must also get permission from someone at your school. Check Ind. Code 20-33-3, available at http://iga.in.gov/legislative/laws/2015/ic/titles/020/articles/033/chapters/003/. There are also restrictions on what hours you will be allowed to work. Some of the hours limitations can be extended only if your parent gives written permission.

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  • How can I bring a FELONY A to the new law ive NOT been tried for it! I bailed out and it was in 2013 Its been drug out till now.

    Back in 2013 my fiancé caught a felony a case b4 the law changed (he HASNT BEEN TRIED IHES BEEN OUT ON BOND AND IT KEPT GETTING EXTENDED)... is there anyway to bring that charge current with the new law since ive still NOT been TRIED YET?

    Gregory’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    The criminal code revisions that were enacted in 2013 took effect on July 1, 2014. The legislation directed that the new laws would apply only to crimes committed after July 1, 2014. If the crime you are asking about took place before that date, the new laws would not apply. This directive from the Indiana General Assembly was codified at Ind. Code § 1-1-5.5-21, available at http://iga.in.gov/legislative/laws/2015/ic/titles/001/articles/001/chapters/5.5/#section-21.

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  • Does the continually payments he has been making extend the 4 years statues of limitations?

    Concerning the statues of limitations. I have a client that owes me $45,000.00 in the state of CA. I have a written agreement with him and he has periodically made payments toward the amount. His last payment was a few days ago. It is now comin...

    Gregory’s Answer

    If the contract or loan document states that the money was due on a certain date, the 4 years would probably start at that date, and you should sue before four years from that date. If the contract requires regular payments, you should sue within four years after the earliest payment that was missed and still unpaid. The idea from the other attorney’s answer that “The statute would begin running when the breach occurs” would explain the statute of limitations where there is a payment schedule written into the contract.
    In any event, since this is California where I do not practice, and because your case may have facts that make your case unusual, it is good advice to talk to a local lawyer about your problem to make sure you do not blow the statute of limitations and lose your rights.

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  • Is there any legal way to force my grandparents into REMOVING me & my minor child from their wills & trust?

    I had a falling out with my father, & his family. His parents (my grandparents) have a will, I am assuming I WAS a beneficiary, but probably am no longer, however I am not sure. My grandparents also set up a trust for my minor son. I highly doubt ...

    Gregory’s Answer

    I do not believe there is any way to have your grandparents remove you from their wills, other than to ask them and persuade them. Just because you are named in the will, however, does not mean you are obligated to take the inheritance. Most states give the beneficiary of the will the right to “renounce” the inheritance. As for your children, the decision to renounce would have to be done by them, and if they are not yet adults when your grandparents pass, someone would have to act on their behalf, and it might not be appropriate for you to make that decision. Someone who is not part of the conflict, and who can act in your children’s best interests might have to be appointed by a court to help make that decision.
    As for the trust, you may not have the same option to renounce the money received from the trust. One option would be to donate the money to some charity that you like and your father does not.

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  • Who is next of kin of a deceased unmarried man with adult children and no will or power of attorney?

    My father passed away a few days ago. My grandmother came here from another state about a month ago to help care for my father and has been making all the decisions for him and not advising me or any of my siblings of any info. He has no valuables...

    Gregory’s Answer

    Most states have a statute that decides who would get the property of the deceased person if there was no will. I do not believe those statutes decide who will be allowed to make decisions about burial. According to funeral.org, some states have “personal preference” laws for disposition of remains, where the deceased is allowed to appoint a person to make that decision. California appears to have a law to determine who decides. Under section 7100 of the California Health and Safety Code, available at http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=hsc&group=07001-08000&file=7100-7117.1, that right goes first to the surviving spouse, then to the surviving adult children, and then to the surviving parents. You might want to discuss this law with your grandmother and if she does not cooperate, you should consult a local attorney.

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  • What should I do? I'm very poor and don't have money for a attorney. Will I go to jail?

    I was stopped for shoplifting in Walmart. The amount was $45.64. I wasn't arrested but I received a ticket from the officer on duty there and now 3 months later I received a summons to come to court. I looked up my charges and I charged with t...

    Gregory’s Answer

    You have been charged with a misdemeanor offense, and the judge has the power to put you in jail if you are convicted. Normally, however, most first-time shoplifting cases are resolved with diversion, or a plea agreement, that do not impose any jail time.
    Discovery is the disclosure of the evidence against you. When you go to court, you or your attorney can get a copy of things like the police report and the Walmart report.
    You should go to court on the date, time and place shown on the summons. When you get there, you should explain that you are poor, and ask for a public defender. If you are poor enough, the judge must provide a public defender at no cost to you. If the judge believes you are not poor enough, or if you want to choose your own attorney, you should hire an attorney to help.

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  • I am in a contract to purchase a home. If I back out now, would I just lose my earnest money besides owing my bank add'l fees?

    In a contract to buy a house and I want out of it. Appraisal and inspection have been done with second inspection this week.

    Gregory’s Answer

    Most purchase agreements I have seen have language allowing the seller to keep the earnest money if the buyer backs out of the contract. This is done to compensate the seller for taking the property off the market while the buyer does the inspections and gets financing. Under that clause, you would be lose the earnest money. Most purchase agreements also have language saying the earnest money is not the seller’s only remedy. Indiana law allows for “specific performance,” which gives the seller the right to go to court to force the buyer to complete the deal. Because all of your rights and obligations are spelled out in the contract, I suggest you take your purchase agreement to a lawyer to be reviewed, and then the lawyer can give you advice specific to your contract.

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  • What can I do to get my step-mother to finally take responsibility for what she did?

    I was emotionally and mentally abused by my step-mother for 10 years. I lived with her from the time that I was 8 years old until my father died when I was 18 years old. I am now 30 years old, and I am still struggling mentally and emotionally, an...

    Gregory’s Answer

    You are allowed to sue, but you should first consider whether it is worth it if you are not likely to win. One reason you might lose is that most states have laws saying a person must bring the lawsuit within a certain number of years after the injury. In your case, they would likely start the time counting from your 18th birthday, but that may not help, because the time limit for most states is usually two to four years. If you are serious about this, it is best to first consult with an attorney licensed in your state.

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  • Will this prevent me from being admitted to law school or being allowed to sit for the bar exam?

    My husband is currently incarcerated for murder and is in the middle of the lengthy processes of appeals.

    Gregory’s Answer

    Your application to law school, and your eligibility to be licensed as an attorney should be based on your conduct only. They should not use your husband’s situation against you, unless you were involved somehow, other than to help him defend against the charges. You can look at the requirements for a law license at the Ind. Admission and Discipline Rules, available at http://www.in.gov/judiciary/rules/ad_dis/index.html.

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