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Ronald Lee Burdge

Ronald Burdge’s Answers

5,081 total


  • I believe my car qualifies as a "Lemon" under the Maryland Lemon law. How do I get someone to help me pursue this claim?

    My car has a 36,000, 3 year warranty, and it currently has about 13,000 miles on it and I bought it in Spring of 2014, so it is just over 1 year old. Last Thursday the car completely died while I was driving it. I was going about 40 and the car ju...

    Ronald’s Answer

    You need to talk to a lemon law lawyer near you in Maryland. There is a link to a website below which has a national list of lemon lawyers, all of whom are members of the only national organization of consumer protection lawyers, NACA. It sounds like you probably do have a lemon, but each state lemon law can be slightly different and only a lawyer knows your law will know the answer for you. There is a national lemon law smart phone app that has the NACA lawyers and it as well as an outline of all of the 50 state lemon laws and that might help you too. A link below goes to that. That app also can give you constant updates on any recalls for your vehicle once you put your vehicle description and it and ask for the recalls to be sent to you. It is all free, so you cannot beat the price! If this answer was helpful, please be sure to give it a vote up. And be sure to Mark the answer that you think was the best so that we can all be certain we are doing good work here. Thanks for asking and good luck.

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  • Is it legal for a car dealership to take vehicle from me for expired tags?

    My vehicle payments were up to date and and so was my full coverage insurance. I have traffic tickets I need to pay off before a can get current tags, but I can not pay tickets without getting to my jobs, I can't get to my jobs without vehicle.

    Ronald’s Answer

    That depends on your finance contract with the dealer so you need to read it carefully to see what it says. Many of them say that if you do not keep the vehicle registered with the BMV or pay for current tags, etc., then it is a breach of the finance contract with the dealer. In that event, the dealer would have a right to take the vehicle for the expired tags. If there is nothing in the finance contract about this, however, the dealer probably does not have that legal right. You need to see a car sales fraud near you in Cincinnati. You can look for one under consumer law or fraud in the find a lawyer section at Avvo.com or you can call the Cincinnati Bar Association and ask for a referral to one near you. If this went answer was helpful, please give it a vote up and be sure to Mark the answers which you think was the best so that we can all be sure we are doing good work here at Avvo. Thanks for asking and good luck

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  • Is it illegal under OH law for a car dealer to give a customer an extended warranty at no charge?

    When doing a car deal on Sat, the car salesman said that they would throw in a 1 yr 12k miles extended warranty at no charge. I asked him that after he showed me a sheet showing the payment amounts with various amounts down. Apparently, it alrea...

    Ronald’s Answer

    The law in Ohio is very clear on this question. Any federal law that might be applicable to car dealers and extended warranties is also quite clear. The car salesman told you that they could give you an extended warranty at no charge because he knows that is a true statement. The finance manager told you it's illegal under Ohio law for car dealer to give an extended warranty at no charge, because he wants to make money off of you. Plain and simple, there is no law that stops a car dealer from giving anything away free if they want to do it. If the finance manager is willing to lie to you about that, you might think real hard before you go back over there to buy a car from them. They can give you anything for free that they want to give you, from the extended warranty to free maintenance plans to credit life insurance and a whole lot more. Car dealers don't do that because they make a profit off every one of those items and at the end of the day profit is what a car dealership is all about. I have been handling car sales fraud cases against car dealers for nearly 40 years and the only thing that seems to change is the boldness of the misrepresentations and the quantity of clever things they can add to the deal without a consumer realizing they are getting charged for it. And, yes, I have sued car dealers in Strongsville for consumers. I strongly recommend you go to some other car dealer. This one has already proven how much you can trust them, in my opinion.if you made the mistake of already buying from this car dealer, you might want to read the Avvo legal guide, what is fraud, which is linked below. If this answer has helped you, be sure to give it a vote up below. And be sure to Mark the answer which you think was the best so that we can all be sure that we are doing good work here on Avvo. Thanks for asking and good luck

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  • What type of lawyer can help me?

    I bought a brand new 2014 Mitsibishi Mirage. Eight months later, I was moving to Florida and my car broke down on the Bronx Expressway. It got towed to Potumkin Hyundai and Mitishbushi dealership. They told me that tge clutch burnt out and they w...

    Ronald’s Answer

    yes, you may be able to do something about it, but only if you act quickly. The dealer may have wanted to charge you poor what should have been, perhaps, a warranty repair because Mitsubishi is holding production in the United States. The dealer may been afraid they could not get paid by Mitsubishi for the work, although that should not have mattered and that probably is not true. you need to talk to a lemon law or car sales fraud lawyer who handles cases where the dealer was located who did this to you. You can look for one here on avvo or you can also check the link below where you will find a national list of lawyers who handle that kind of case. All of them are members of the only consumer protection organization for lawyers in the country, NACA. If you are right about the warranty, covering the problem, then the dealer would have committed fraud on you by pushing you into the Hyundai purchase and taking advantage of your situation. Every state has a "UDAP" law a merchant to do anything that is unfair or deceptive when dealing with a consumer in a consumer transaction. However, each law can be a little different so you need to talk to a local lawyer where that car dealer was located and find out for sure what your rights are. But act quickly because for every legal right you have, there is only a limited amount of time in which to file a claim or your rights expire. If this answer was helpful, please note that below. And be sure mark the best answer that you get so that we can all be certain we are doing a good job here on Avvo. Thank you and good luck.

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  • Dealership charged me for something that came standard on vehicle

    Just purchased this vehicle. On the purchase contract, under dealer installed equipment, they charged me for the wheels as an added expense to the vehicle. I have looked it up and gathered evidence, and according to it, the wheels that were on t...

    Ronald’s Answer

    you did not say whether you bought this vehicle new or used but I'm not certain that would make any difference anyway.if you bought the vehicle new and the wheels that are on it are standard equipment for that model, and the dealer should not charged you an additional amount for the standard wheels. You will have to prove it, though so the paperwork you have is extremely important. You need the new vehicle window sticker and the "knock up" sticker. If there was one or the sales contract – whatever shows that an additional charge occurred. Doing this would be a violation of the Ohio consumer sales practices act and probably also the Ohio advertisement and sale of motor vehicles rule. Depending on the details, it might also be fraud. You would not be able to cancel the transaction, however, unless the vehicle was in substantially the same condition as it was when you 1st got it. That means not much more than the miles that were on it when you got it and no accident or damage occurring while you have had it. You only have a "reasonable" amount of time to try to cancel the transaction once you know what the legal grounds are for that. the dealer is highly unlikely to agree to let you out of the deal. If you want to try to cancel the deal, then you need to write a short (one page) letter to the dealer telling them that you are canceling the deal because of this and explain it. Keep a copy of that letter and mail the original to them by certified mail, return receipt. If you can email or fax it to them also, do that too. Tell them you want an answer within 10 days. They will probably try to merely refund the wheel cost so you will have to decide if that will be enough for you. If not, then you are going to need an attorney to straighten this out for you because you would have to file a claim against them. They should contact a lemon law or car sales fraud lawyer of your choice. You can look for one in the Dayton area on at Avvo under the find a lawyer tab. Or you can call the Dayton Bar Association and ask for a referral. We handle those kinds of cases and a few other attorneys in Southwest Ohio also do that kind of work.but act quickly because you only have a limited amount of time to file a claim or your rights will expire automatically. Under the Ohio consumer sales practices act, that time limit is 2 years from the date of sale. But do not wait. You have to act as soon as you know you have the right to do that. If this answer is helpful,then please indicate that below. And be sure to mark the answer that you think was the best so that we can all be sure that we are doing good work. Thanks for asking and good luck.

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  • I'm a salesman that works for a small used car lot, i sold a customer a car "AS IS" they are not happy with it can they sue me?

    5 moths later i get a summons for small claims court . I am just an employee. do they have a case?

    Ronald’s Answer

    Yes, there are several cases where courts have allowed it. An employee of a company in Ohio can be individually sued by a consumer for any violation of the Ohio Consumer Sales Practices Act which they commit in the course of a consumer transaction, like selling a car to a consumer. The consumer does not have to sue the car dealership itself, although that often occurs. The Ohio Consumer Sales Practices Act also resulted in the Ohio Advertisement and Sale of Motor Vehicles Rule which also governs car dealers and their employees and provides for the consumer to have the right to file a claim against any employee or car dealership that violates that law too. You should talk to a local attorney or consider settling the dispute with the consumer if the dealership won't settle it. There is a two year time limit under this law for the consumer to file their claim in court. So if it is filed in time, then yes, they may me able to do it. Whether their claim has merit depends on what happened in the transaction. I am surprised that the dealership isn't standing behind you and taking care of your problem. If they instructed you to do what you are accused of doing, then you may have the right to sue the dealer. Of course, they would likely fire you too. Best bet? Talk to a local Consumer Law attorney right away. If this answer was helpful, please give a “Vote Up” review below. And be sure to indicate the best answer to your question so we can all be sure we are being helpful

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  • I had my oil changed, messed my truck up still not right now I have stress hives what can I do about this?

    I had my oil changed about 11 months ago in alliance, Ohio were I use to live before to Dayton. The drain plug was not tightened blew engine. Alliance shop couldn't do engine so they had Warren Ohio do it. They put engine in, about hour from home...

    Ronald’s Answer

    When you take a motor vehicle to a repair shop for them to do any kind of service or repair work on it, you have the right to expect the work will be done right. And unless they use special language to avoid giving you a warranty, in Ohio you automatically get a warranty that they are going to do the work in a "good workmanlike manner." That basically requires that they do the repair or service work right. If they don't, then you have a right to recover damages for what they do wrong or the damage they cause (or, if they don’t return your vehicle at all, for the value of the motor vehicle itself). You also have to be able to prove that the reason for your new problem is something that the repair shop did or did not do while they had it. In other words, you have to be able to show that it was fault of the repair shop and they didn’t fix it after you brought it to their attention again. So the first thing to do is ask the repair shop to fix it right. Your obligation is to give the shop a reasonable chance to get it fixed and their obligation is to get it fixed. If they don’t get it fixed, or won’t do it under their own warranty, then in Ohio you would have the right to get it fixed somewhere else and then hold the first repair shop liable for the repair cost. If the cost is less than a $3,000, you may be able to sue the shop in your local small claims court without needing to hire an lawyer. If the primary use of your vehicle is everyday consumer-type use, such as a family car, then doing the repair work badly may also violate other consumer protection laws in Ohio, like Ohio’s Motor Vehicle Repair Rule (most shops violate that law in more than one way and you can read it at the link below). There’s also a link below to an Avvo Legal Guide that explains what fraud is, legally. But if the repair or service work was for a commercial product (like a heavy duty commercial truck), then consumer protection laws don’t apply to your situation. Because the law is different you need to talk to a local Consumer Law attorney - they know both the consumer laws and the commercial laws that might apply to help you out. There’s a link below for an Online 50 State National List of Consumer Law Lawyers where you can go and find one near you (lawyers don’t pay to get listed there and most of them are members of the only national association for Consumer Law lawyers, NACA.net). You can also look for one here on Avvo under the Find a Lawyer tab. Or you can call your local attorney's Bar Association and ask for a referral to a Consumer Law attorney near you. But act quickly because for every legal right you have, there is only a limited amount of time to actually file a lawsuit in court or your rights expire (it's called the statute of limitations), so don't waste your time getting to a Consumer Law attorney and finding out what your rights are. If this answer was helpful, please give a “Vote Up” review below. And be sure to vote for the Best Answer too. It helps all of us understand we are doing a good job answering your questions. Thanks for asking and Good Luck

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  • I would like to know if there are any precedents for suing a company for releasing an unfinished product that is unusable.

    For example a video game/console. The only lawsuit I could find was EA's for misleading investors. I've contacted that company about a refund and they just give me steps to fix the problem that doesn't work. The retailed only offers "credits" whic...

    Ronald’s Answer

    Yes, there is a law that can make a company liable for selling an unfinished product if it represents it to be finished and ready for consumer use. Ohio has a “Udap” law that may help you. The technical name for it is the Ohio Consumer Sales Practices Act. This laws makes it illegal for a merchant or business to do anything that is unfair or deceptive or unconscionable to a consumer in a consumer transaction. What might be unfair or deceptive can be a matter of opinion and the facts and circumstances could make a lot of difference. Misrepresenting a product, misleading statements or hiding the truth, or committing fraud on a consumer may be violations of Ohio’s Udap law. Ohio’s law also has a “price gouging” prohibition too, which makes it illegal to charge a price for something that is substantially in excess of what that type of product or service is being sold for elsewhere. If the product is defective, that can be unfair to the buyer. If the product is not as represented, that can be unfair to the buyer. The remedies for a violation of this Ohio law let the buyer pick between recovering their damages, cancelling the transaction or, in certain cases, recovering three times your damages. And even if the buyer has not been hurt they can still recover $200 just to punish the wrongdoer. And this Ohio law says that the consumer generally can also make the merchant pay their attorney fees. Ohio’s law is based on the “uniform” Udap law and you can read a short summary of this Udap law at the link below. If less than $3,000 is at stake, you can file a claim in your local small claims court. Otherwise you really need to talk to a local Consumer Law attorney who deals with this kind of case and can tell you how your law works. There is a link to a web site page below where you can find a Free Online 50 State National List of Consumer Law Lawyers and find one near you (lawyers don’t pay to get listed here and most of them are members of the only national association for Consumer Law lawyers, NACA.net). You can also look for one here on Avvo under the Find a Lawyer tab for Consumer Law. Or you can call your local attorney's Bar Association and ask for a referral to a Consumer Law attorney near you. But act quickly because for every legal right you have, there is only a limited amount of time to actually file a lawsuit in court or your rights expire (it's called the statute of limitations), so don't waste your time getting to a Consumer Law attorney and finding out what your rights are. If this answer was helpful, please give a “Vote Up” review below. And be sure to indicate the best answer to your question so we can all be sure we are being helpful. Thanks for asking and Good Luck

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  • Can double payment from two sources be taken back, if I myself have not committed any fraud or confusion?

    The company I work for uses a temp-to-hire service for their 90day probationary period. The company chose to hire me on as a full time employee, however the temp-to-hire service failed to take me from their direct deposit "list" or what have you. ...

    Ronald’s Answer

    Basically all Law is grounded on morality, the principle of what is basically right and wrong. It is always safer to consider that first and forget about searching for loopholes that enable you to keep money that you know you should not have received. Is it ethical to keep money that was accidentally paid to you by your employer? It doesn't matter which one it was in your case. You know you earned one paycheck and not two. Ethical basically means doing what is right and fair. Do you really think that you have the right to keep money that you did not earn from an employer? Do you really think that it is fair for you to not pay back the money that was accidentally given to you when they did not realize that you were already getting paid by someone else for the same work? Do the right thing here, either go along with what your employer is doing or just give them back the money entirely right now, if you haven't spent it already. Now besides ethics, there's the practical side too. Don't look for a loophole to keep the money. In Ohio the general rule is that no one has a "right" to employment; so if you don't go along with what the employer says, they can fire you. People who make a habit of looking for loopholes or doing the wrong thing run the risk of ending up in jail sooner or later. People who always do the right thing needn't worry about that.

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  • Bought a car from private seller on payment. Trying to repo? What can I do?

    So, I paid this guy three payments to pay off a car bought from him. Our contract is signed and notarized and I had him sign proof of payment each time he was paid. He now claims he wasn't paid and is repoing car. I paid him 15k. What can I do? He...

    Ronald’s Answer

    If you have paid him all that is owed then he can't legally repo it; be sure to keep your contract and proof of payments in a safe place (not in the car) and keep a copy of it all in the car so if a repo man or the police come by you can show and prove you are right. If the seller won't back off, then your best bet is to get a local lawyer to write the seller a strong letter explaining that you have paid in full and to leave you alone. You said nothing about the title but if you have fully paid and didn't get the title from the seller yet, then ask for it. If you still owe anything but dispute it then write a letter or phone to find out what and why it is owed. If you don't get this straightened out then go see a local contract law lawyer right away. otherwise, a repo man could hook and haul it away in the middle of the night and you won't know it until you wake the next day. If you can, park it in a secure garage or otherwise locked up in a secure location until this gets worked out. If you need a lawyer and don't know who to call, call the local attorney's bar association and ask for a referral to a local contract law lawyer. But act quick because for every legal right you have there is only a limited amount of time to use it or lose it. If this answer was helpful, please give it a vote up and be sure to mark which answer you get is the best so we can all be sure we are doing good work here on avvo. Thanks for asking and good luck

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