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Jeffrey Adam Devore

Jeffrey Devore’s Answers

6,504 total


  • Have you ever got ICE to joint a motion to terminate a removal nunc pro tunc in a I-140 case? I need to terminate my removal

    I was granted a withholding of removal in 2006, then I file a I-140 and I got my green card. On November 2014 I filed a I-400 but it was denied because the removal proceeding was never terminated. The immigration judge wants ICE to join the motion...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    There is obviously a long history to your case because you were evidently granted lawful permanent residence in error as you were still in removal proceedings. This case be fixed, but more facts are needed to determine how best to proceed in your case. Consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can review your case, advise you of the options available, and how best to proceed.

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  • I did temporary call girl work when I was in my early 20's to support myself and baby. I was charged with prostitution.

    I didn't do any time, I hired and attorney and was able to lower the charge and just did community hours. I've never had any other problems with the law ever. Eventually I got my record exponshed in 2004. I've had my permanent green card since I ...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    Generally speaking, expungements are ineffective for immigration purposes. However, based upon the facts you present, your criminal history does not appear to be bar to naturalization. You should consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can review your case with you in detail and advise you how best to proceed.

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  • What can I do to find out what the problem is with my pending I-485 (Asylum based) case and finally get my green card?

    I was granted asylum by USCIS Miami Asylum Office in Feb 2013. It's been 15 months since I've filed I-485 to adjust my status. It was sent from Texas center to Miami Asylum Office over a year ago right after I got my biometrics done back in Feb 20...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    Generally speaking, I-485's are not adjudicated at an asylum office. They are usually sent there when USCIS is considering revoking the prior grant of asylum. Something is up with your case and you're not going to get it resolved by looking for free advice on this forum (as much as you would like it to be the case). I suggest you schedule a consultation with an experienced immigration attorney who can review your case, advise you as to the options available, and recommend how best to proceed. You will find the money well spent.

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  • My friend was charged with rape case and he his here on student visa will he be deported to back?

    One of my friend was charged with first degree rape, a class B felony and within a month this was dropped to Rape in the 3rd degree, a Class E Non-Violent Felony and Sex Abuse in the 3rd degree, a Class B Misdemeanor as their were no evidences. B...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    Your friend should consult with an experienced immigration attorney BEFORE entering any plea so he can be sure of any immigration consequences which may attach.

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  • If someone was deported due to dwi could they apply for a pardon if parent fell ill in the states even if just temporary?

    My brother was very young when he he was deported, I believe he was under 21 he was deported even though he had never lived in Mexico and barely knew the language. His permanant resident status removed and was told not to come back. He enter the U...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    It appears that there is more to your brother's immigration history then you know. Generally speaking simple DWI is not a deportable offense. When your brother will be able to return to the U.S. will depend on the specifics of his immigration and criminal history. Consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can review the facts of his case and advise as to the options available.

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  • How to become an immigration lawyer simple step by step instructions

    eg. hs diploma

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    Becoming a lawyer usually takes 7 years of full-time study after high school—4 years of undergraduate study, followed by 3 years of law school. Most states and jurisdictions require lawyers to complete a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree from a law school accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA). ABA accreditation signifies that the law school—particularly its curricula and faculty—meets certain standards. A bachelor’s degree is required for entry into most law schools, and courses in English, public speaking, government, history, economics, and mathematics are useful.

    Your high school guidance counselor should be able to assist you in making educational and career plans. You can also look at the Department of Labor's Occupational Outlook Handbook for further guidance. Click on the link below to visit it's page on Lawyers.

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  • Fastest way to bring fiancee to US.

    My fiancee lives in EU. What will be fastest way of bringing her to US and married and once we do that can she stay until paperwork is done ? we did prepare form I129F . It does state we have to wait for a year.

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    The answer to your question will depend on a number of different factors which can only be determined after a review of the facts of your case. Consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can review your case, advise you of the options available, and recommend the best way to proceed.

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  • Child of fiancee

    My fiancee has a child that is 20 yrs old. In this point we are planing to get her in US. Latter on she takes care of her status in US will plan in bringing kid in US. Do we need to include kid in I-129F since that is question on form ?

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    The form requires you to list all children. It does not state "list only the ones you plan on accompanying you now." More importantly, however, at 20 years old you have a very limited window to bring the child to the U.S. for a number of different reasons. This is because he has has already attained 18 years of age meaning you cannot be considered a step parent and he will be turning 21 soon. Once the latter happens he can no longer be considered a child and the wait will be many years.

    This is an area of immigration law fraught with landmines for the unwary. Do yourself a huge favor and have a consultation with an experienced immigration attorney who can review the facts of your case with you, advise you of the issues which need to be considered and recommend an appropriate course of action. Better to make a conscious decision knowing the results in advance then to be surprised as the result when you could have prevented it.

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  • I140 & priority date carry forward

    I am working for company A and has i140 approved, i am planing to leave the company and willstay out of the country for more than an year. If I want to come back after an year can employer B file my H1B based on my i140 approval and my priority d...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    The answer to your question depends not so much on the I-140, but how many years of H-1B eligibility you have left or if you will be subject to the H-1B cap. Consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can review your case with you and adise you how best to proceed.

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  • How i can get my wife from iraq

    Good morning my name is mohammed am from iraq and i came to usa as iom immigrants and i just full the application of green card and i wanne see my wife couse i have been one year didn't see it so what i have to do

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    The options available to bring your wife to the United States will depend upon how you were admitted to the U.S. and whether she can be included in your case or will require a separate petition. Consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can review your case and advise you about the possible options and how best to proceed.

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