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Jeffrey Adam Devore

Jeffrey Devore’s Answers

6,515 total


  • My daughter did not disclose that she was married when I, an LPR, petitioned for her; now I've become a USC.

    I petitioned my adult single daughter 2 years ago. I was an LPR and she told me she had not married. My daughter never disclosed to me that she was married at the time I filed the petition. She then got divorced during this process. I became a ...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    Unfortunately, nothing is going to change. A lawful permanent resident can only petition for an unmarried child (regardless of age). Since your daughter was married at the time the petition was filed she was never eligible to begin with. That does not change because you later became a U.S. citizen. A beneficiary must be eligible a the time the petition was filed until he or she enters the United States.

    You need to file a new petition on your daughter's behalf. Since she is married she will be eligible under the family 3rd preference. As you have found out there is much more to immigration then just filing forms. Consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can make sure that the case proceeds without further delay.

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  • Can my husband, an LPR, file an I-130 for my minor child who lives overseas?

    My husband is an LPR; we have been married for a while. I have a son in my native country who is 12 years old. I would like to know if my husband could petition my minor child, since my husband and I got married when my child was 8 years old. T...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    Yes, your husband can petition for your son because he was under 18 years old at the time you were married. Your son therefore qualifies as his stepchild for immigration purposes.

    However, if your husband has already petitioned for you then your son was included in your case. This is true even if you have already become a permanent resident as your son can be issued an immigrant visa to join you in the United States. There are, however, pitfalls in this area of the law as it is very fact specific.

    Consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can review the facts of the case with you, advise you as to the options available, and the best way to proceed.

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  • Do I need to fill out form I-212?

    I just petitioned for my father to have him move to the US. We have already been approved by the NVC and I already submitted his application. But after looking over the types of documents I still need to mail to NVC, I noticed if a person has been...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    I agree with Mr. Jairam. Without knowing your father's immigration history in detail simply because he was deported more than 10 years ago does not mean that he will be issued an immigrant visa. There are many traps for the unwary. Consult with an experienced immigration attorney. The cost of doing so will be well worth the piece of mind you will have knowing what to expect and how to deal with it.

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  • Hello, i want to know if is possible get a L1 status in USA with my B1?B2 visa.

    Hello, i want to know if is possible get a L1 status in USA with my own business. I want register mi own business in USA. Now i have B1/B2 but i want change my status for be legal in this country. i am already in USA and i want do it reall...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    Assuming you satisfy the requirements for an L-1 visa and a change of status application, you can change status from B-1 or B-2 to L-1. There are, however, advantages and disadvantages in changing one's status. Consult with an experienced immigration attorney for assistance in determining what's best for you

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  • Marriage-based conditional Green Card: How long before the interview will the interview date be notified to us?

    Applied for marriage-based conditional GG, did biometrics 2 months ago. How long before the interview does USCIS usually mail the notification with the interview date? Thank you

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    Generally speaking, for applicants who reside in the jurisdiction of the USCIS West Palm Beach Field Office, interview notices are generally received 3-4 weeks in advance of the interview date

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  • My father in law currently has a final deportation is there any way he can fight this please help

    my father in law has a final deportation hold we are trying to get as much info as possible with very little luck he does have a few things on his record but all were dropped yes I believe one was a felony but again that was dropped I spoke to a a...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    There is obviously a long history to your father in-law's immigration status. The limited facts you present really don't provide much to work with. Consult with an experienced immigration attorney. He will be able to get the information needed from you or if you do not know it. know how to track it down to determine the best way to help your father in-law.

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  • Is there a good attorney for our company?

    We are seeking a lawyer to convert a tourist visa to a work visa and help bring workers legally to the USA to work for us.

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    There are many excellent immigration attorneys. In Florida you can look for a Board Certified Immigration Attorney. These attorneys have submitted to a rigorous examination on immigration law and a peer review. You can learn more about Florida Bar Board Certification by clicking on the link below.

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  • I-130 filled while on a tourist visa? Would that be illegal?

    our plan is to get married when i arrive to the U.S on my B1/B2 tourist visa, and then she (my soon to be U.S spouse) will fill out the I-130 petition while I remain with her AFTER the marriage up until my I-94 expires and then leave to my home co...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    You have a lot of good questions here. However, what will be best in your situation will depend upon the specific facts of your case. This forum is therefore not the place to get the advice you need. Consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can review the facts of your case with you and your fiancee and advise you as to the options available and the best way to proceed. Many attorneys will conduct consultations via telephone or Skype for clients outside their local area.

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  • Immigration, deportation, and criminal issue

    My brother is currently detained in Krome detention center in miami. He is from brazil but was adjusted to a lawful permanent resident on January 4, 2015. On March 2, 2015, he was convicted of possesion of alprazolam and methylone, third degree fe...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    Under the facts that you present it appears that your brother is subject to mandatory detention without bond. Additionally, his prospects for relief due to the timeline appear to be limited. He should look into having his convictions vacated, but needs to be careful to avoid "jumping from the frying pan into the fire." IN any event, he needs an experienced immigration attorney to represent him (as my colleagues have stated). This forum not going to provide the answers both you and he need.

    Consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can review the facts of the case and recommend how best to proceed. From what you describe this is his first appearance before the Immigration Court so the judge should grant him a continuance to secure counsel if he requests one.

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  • Can I get the Driver's License with pending application for Asylum status in Florida?

    I have applied for asylum status in Florida within a year after my arrival and have a receipt with me. Can I get a temporary Driver’s License in my situation? Thank you!

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    With a pending application for asylum you are eligible for a driver's license in the State of Florida. You do not need to wait until you receive employment authorization or have a social security number. If you are having trouble successfully obtaining a license, consult with an immigration attorney who has experience resolving these issues. Unfortunately, many of the tax collector clerks often get confused with what documents are required due to the complexities of U.S. immigration law.

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