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Jeffrey M Feuer

Jeffrey Feuer’s Answers

52 total


  • I have been laid off. They are offering a severance package. How should I view it?

    I have been laid off yesterday. There has been some rumblings with downsizing the R&D budget and yesterday was the day it hit. They brought me in the morning, sat with HR, and was told they doing a reduction in force with my position ending effect...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    An attorney can help you by reviewing the separation agreement to make sure that it is fair to you. It is an important legal document that can have significant impact on your life and future employment prospects. Among the issues that an attorney can help you with are: (1) what does the agreement provide for if you apply for unemployment insurance?; (2) what does the agreement provide for in terms of a reference for you with future employers?; (3) what does the agreement provide for in terms of the company saying anything negative about you or you saying anything negative about the company?; (4) have you had an opportunity to review your personnel file and respond to anything that is negative in it?; (5) does the agreement say anything about the possibility of you being rehired in the future?; (6) are you required to keep the agreement confidential and, if so, from whom?; (7)do you have any other employment benefits that need to be addressed? There may be other issues as well that are covered too generally or not covered specifically that should be added to the agreement. Remember, this agreement was drafted by the company with its interests in mind, not yours. Spending a small amount to have a lawyer review the document is the best way to protect yourself and to make sure that you are not signing an unfair or one-sided agreement.

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  • Is it legal to work for a company for 13 years and never get a raise?

    My boyfriend works for a small company that he's made the same amount of money an hour for 13 years and has never gotten any raises we live in mass and he does make more than minimum wage but is it legal to not get a raise ever!

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    This why we have unions, so that employers cannot take advantage of workers as is being done with your boyfriend. However, there is nothing in the law that requires an employer, absent a union contract or a personal employment contract, to give anybody a raise at any time, as long as they are paid the required minimm wage.

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  • Is there anything I can do to be compensated for being fired?

    I had a salary job in insurance with benefits and weekends off. I got a call from a company that begged to get me. I went in for an interview and thought it was ok. I declined their offer first but then they offered to match my salary so I was in...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    This is a difficult situation as you did not have any guarantees in writing about all of the things that you wanted in the new job before you quit your old job. That being said, if you can prove that you reasonably relied on their promises to adhere to your terms and that is what convinced you to quit your old job to go with the new company, you MAY (depending on several other factors) have a claim against the new company. However, unless the new company promised to hire you for a specific period of time or promised to give you an employment contract for a specific length of time, that company could legally fire you at any time after you started work there if they felt you weren't working out. So, the amount of damages that you suffered (in a legal sense) may be difficult to prove. you need to meet with an employment lawyer to see if you have a viable legal case.

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  • How to break apartment lease

    We have lived at our apartment for almost 3 years. Last year someone moved in above us over the last several months he has been smoking weed in his apartment. When he does the smell travels down here and fills up our whole place. I have complained...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    You have a right to the "quiet enjoyment" of your rented apartment and, if your landlord is allowing illegal activities to take place in another apartment, he could be liable to you for monetary damages. Your lease may also contain clauses protecting your rights to non-interference by noxious neighbors. You need to speak with an attorney to get some suggestions as to how to best approach your landlord to resolve this problem.

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  • My landlord opeed my door without out knocking over 4 times,only this time when he opened it I was standing there naked,what can

    He has been making comments about my body an even told me I hope your husband is nailing you!!!!

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    You have a number of legal options, including applying for a restraining order, getting an injunction, suing him for invasion of privacy, filing a police report, etc. But, be aware that your landlord is likely to tell a completely different story about what has happened and may increase his harassment of you. It may well be your word against his, without further proof of what occurred. What you choose to do will depend greatly on what your goal is -- do you want to stay in the apartment? get monetary compensation from him? get some time to move and payment of moving expenses? prosecute him criminally? change the locks on the apartment? You should consult a lawyer to help you determine your best course of action and how to achieve the goals that you want.

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  • Should I hire an attorney at this point?

    My landlord has refused to return my security deposit. It is now more than 30 days since I moved out. There's nothing to warrant her keeping the deposit. Besides, I haven't even received any explanation why it's being withheld. I don't owe any ren...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    Since you did not owe any rent, your landlord was required to return your full security deposit to you within 30 days of the end of your tenancy (assuming that there were no damages to the apartment). His failure to do so entitles you to a mandatory award of three times your security deposit plus any interest owed on that deposit (at the rate of 5% per year) plus any court costs and reasonable attorney's fees that you may incur. You do NOT have to write a demand letter to your landlord. You can either bring a small claims action against your landlord yourself or you can hire an attorney (whose fees will be paid by the landlord) to sue your landlord for the recovery of your security deposit, including the mandatory triple damages. My office regularly handles these cases quickly and successfully.

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  • Just moved in. Past tenants in our place have told us that they have copies of keys to our place and can't give them back

    Is it our responsibility to replace the locks or is it our landlords? Obviously its always a possibility that copies were made of the keys and other people have it, but in this case we know for sure that the keys are out there (we have it in writi...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    A landlord is entitled, under Mass. Gen. Laws chapter 186, sec. 15B, to charge a new tenant for the actual cost of changing the locks on a rental unit. You might be better off doing it yourself.

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  • My employer hasn't paid me my paycheck for the pay period May 15th to May 30th. What are my rights? Can I get my money?

    He included the amount in my W-2 though. I don't work there any more. The company is shut-down. The owner won't lift my calls

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    Massachusetts laws provides a minimum set of standards for when, how and how much employees must be paid. You can file (for free) a Non-payment of Wages Complaint form with the Massachusetts Attorney General's office by clicking on the link provided herein or call the AG's office at (617) 727-3465. They will investigate the claim for you and may be able to force the employer to pay you.

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  • Is the original claim considered on a small claims appeal or only the actual judgement in Ma?

    I won a partial judgement on a security deposit dispute. The landlord has filed an appeal stating he felt rushed.

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    I would need more details about your original claim and what the "partial judgment" consisted of. In addition, I would need to know if you had your initial hearing in front of a judge or a clerk-magistrate. If it was a clerk-magistrate, the new "appeal" hearing will be in front of a judge who will hear the whole case. However, if your initial hearing was held by a judge, the appeal process goes to the next court level and is more complicated. In general, in a small claims case, the plaintiff is not entitled to appeal -- only the defendant can do so. You should speak with a landlord-tenant attorney to get specific information about your case.

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  • Security Deposit Interest and Last Month Interest

    With interest rates down to nothing what is a Landlord required to give you when you vacate premise. I thought it was sec deposit and last months plus five percent interest according to attorney general. Also, I never got a receipt back. Is...

    Jeffrey’s Answer

    If the landlord did not return your full security deposit within 30 days of you vacating the apartment, you are entitled to sue him for three times the security deposit plus attorney's fees and costs and 5% interest per year (if he did not place the security deposit in an escrow bank account and give you the proper receipt). Such a claim can be brought in small claims court relatively inexpensively and without a lawyer.

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