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Thomas Fred Meyer

Thomas Meyer’s Answers

202 total


  • Should I respond to foreclosure paperwork if I am only on deed and not on mortgage?

    Thomas’s Answer

    Is the market value of the home more or less than the mortgage? If more, than you may have some value to capture here. If not, then there is little incentive to cooperate with the lender. If you just want some added piece of mind, you could offer to cooperate to speed up the foreclosure for the lender by consenting to a judgment or offering a deed in lieu in exchange for a full general release from all liability under the loan. If any of this is of interest, then hire a lawyer to advise and navigate you through such negotiations with the lender.

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  • What is a lump sum settlement?

    Thomas’s Answer

    Lots of unknown facts in your question. It seems like some creditor went to court and obtained a judgment against you for $1,599.45. However, it sounds like the judge may be able to provide you with some unspecified relief from this judgment if you can show hardship. Do you know what kind of relief you might get if you demonstrate the required hardship? You need to know this BEFORE you would be able to consider whether or not to accept the offer to pay off the judgment quickly at a discount. I would definitely call the court, or better yet have a lawyer review everything that happened and let the lawyer call the court for you to figure out what relief the court might offer. Lawsuits and judgments are always best handled by lawyers. Do not try to handle this on your own.

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  • Can I enforce mediation agreement if my ex-husband does not sign it?

    Thomas’s Answer

    Agreements reached in mediation are enforceable, however, such agreements must be in writing signed by both parties. If would be an uphill fight to try to enforce the writing that you later signed but your ex did not. That is all likely still considered confidential mediation communications, which your ex could rightfully seek to keep out of court.

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  • What do I do if I was under the impression I was going to be able to purchase the home I was lived in and it was foreclosed on.

    Thomas’s Answer

    Unfortunately, you are not a party to the loan secured by the property which is being foreclosed. You certainly have an interest in the property under some oral or written agreement to occupy it for a time. Whatever interest you have is likely subordinate / inferior to the right of the lender to foreclosure. To clear all interests, the lender needs to notify (serve) you and everyone else who has any interests in the property. Whether or not you were properly served (notified) is an issue best determined by a lawyer should you wish to fight service. Accept and understand that your fight is not with the lender but rather with the owner/ investor who led you to pay money under a supposed agreement to buy the property which he or she will likely not be able to sell. If you really still want to buy the buy the property, then, If / when the lender completes the foreclosure and acquires the property, you might then be able to buy it from them. Alternatively, you or someone else could bid to buy the property at the foreclosure sale. An experienced foreclosure lawyer can help you navigate through all of this.

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  • Contractor didn't provide estimate, and didn't let me know price along the way, as requested, then charged $1400.

    Thomas’s Answer

    You are asking is it fair? Well, certainly not as far as you are concerned, but as far as the plumber is concerned, they probably think its totally fair. As far as what was the actual understandings between you and the plumber, without a written agreement, that will likely come down to their word against yours. In the end, the plumber will likely have a right to sue and lien your property for the reasonable value of whatever work they did.

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  • How do I get my money back and back out a contract ?

    Thomas’s Answer

    Sounds like there is a problem with the financing. I do know what you signed or agreed to do or what the dealership agreed to do in this situation. All of the documents you received and signed will largely determine your rights. If you really don't want to wait any longer and the dealership is not willing to voluntarily terminate everything and refund whatever monies you paid so far, you need to have a lawyer review all the documents to determine your rights and advise you how best to exercise them.

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  • Tenant burned unit down by mistake or negligence? Can the landlord sue and win

    Thomas’s Answer

    Sounds like this should be an insurance claim, not a lawsuit. As long as its covered by some policy, let the insurers worry about who to ultimately hold responsible.

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  • I represent a seller whose property did not close on time. Is the contract dead and can we move onto another buyer?

    Thomas’s Answer

    Well, if there was a breach by the buyer, it would next be up to the seller to duly declare it and notify the buyer accordingly in accordance with the terms of the purchase and sales agreement. The buyer then may or may not have an opportunity to cure. The PSA will define exactly what is a breach and what are the remedies as a result. The seller should have a lawyer review ALL the facts and terms of the PSA first and THEN advise if / when the the PSA can be terminated to allow the seller to put the property back on the market to try sell to someone else.

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  • My dining and bedroom furniture was badly damaged and my walls were left with holes by friends who moved my furniture

    Thomas’s Answer

    Lessons learned - If you already paid them the $2000 and you have no written signed agreement to clearly define what you expected, level of care and remedies for any damages, then you really don't seem to have much leverage to pursue any claims.

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  • Can a realtor put a lien on my moms house .....mom never signed a listing agreement nor has she ever talked to her ever ?

    Thomas’s Answer

    There is obviously more to this story that can be written here. Now that its all escalated into a lawsuit, if you haven't done so already, you better retain counsel to defend the case ASAP. There are ways a title insurer can bond / insurer over such a lien / cloud on title so Mom may be able to close a sale and still retain all rights to continue to fight this lien after closing.

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