Mark S Guralnick’s Answers

Mark S Guralnick

Marlton Family Law Attorney.

Contributor Level 14
  1. Errant Attorney: Wait or Terminate?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Mark S Guralnick
    1 lawyer answer

    I'd send him a certified letter and ask for a face-to-face meeting. If he'll meet with you, make an agreement on the timeline for the progress of your case and the level of communication you'd like to have. Make sure your expectations are not unreasonable. If he doesn't respond quickly, I'd recommend retaining another attorney. In many cases, I find that the "early bird gets the worm." Therefore, dragging one's feet is not likely to be helping you. We handle custody cases in NY. If we...

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  2. What's the best way to settle an out of state property damage claim

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Mark S Guralnick
    1 lawyer answer

    We may be able to get jurisdiction in the Montgomery County Courts in Norristown, Pa, depending on your circumstances. I would recommend that we file a lawsuit. Let me know the name of the manufacturer and seller of the chandelier? Who installed it? Where did you buy it? How did you buy it? You may have more than one target Defendant to go after. We're based in Montgomery County and the surrounding area. Feel free to call and I'll walk you through the process I hope this is helpful....

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  3. Is it my right to reveiw a contract i work under

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Mark S Guralnick
    1 lawyer answer

    Makes no sense. If you're subject to the terms of the contract, you should have a copy of it. Under the Landrum-Griffin Act, you are entitled to equal rights. Every member of a labor organization has equal rights and privileges within such organization to nominate candidates, to vote in elections or referendums of the labor organization, to attend membership meetings, and to participate in the deliberations and voting upon the business of such meetings. You should therefore get a copy of...

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  4. After death?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Mark S Guralnick
    1 lawyer answer

    The Prosecutor's Office can, at its election, charge anybody with anything at any time (although they may attempt to seek an indictment through a grand jury for particular kinds of charges). But the reality is that the charges will be dismissed or withdrawn if the Defendant is deceased. If this response was helpful, please check "thumbs up" below. Thanks. Mark S. Guralnick 1-866-337-2900 msglegal@comcast.net

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  5. Does a child of divorced parents, get easier or more consideration for college financial aid in New Jersey or Federally?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Mark S Guralnick
    1 lawyer answer

    First, regarding your separation, New Jersey offers you some alternatives to a divorce from the bonds of matrimony (your typical divorce). In NJ, you can obtain a "Divorce from Bed and Board," which essentially dissolves your physical and residential relationship but does not dissolve the bond of matrimony. This kind of "limited divorce" is often used by people with strong religious commitments to formalize the terms of their separation without totally getting divorced. I cannot tell you...

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  6. Relocated to NJ, but continuing to use LLC created in PA...any issues with that ?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Mark S Guralnick
    2. Steven J. Fromm
    2 lawyer answers

    A few legal concerns come to mind. Have you registered your PA LLC in NJ as a foreign business entity? You may wish to register it in NJ (through the NJ Department of Revenue Division of Commercial Recording)...even if it's based in PA. Unless you're properly registered in NJ, you won't have the right to use our court system or to take advantage of other state benefits. Of course, if it's based in PA, you might be sued in PA; you might to file or pay taxes in PA, and you might lose some...

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  7. Should my 11 year old be required to stay with his step-mother when his father is not around if he doesn't want to?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Mark S Guralnick
    1 lawyer answer

    See my answer to your other post. There's no magic age for your son to say "no," but historically, the older he is, the more likely his wishes will be honored by the court. Good luck. If you felt this post was helpful, please click on thumbs up (helpful) tab. Thanks. Mark S. Guralnick Attorney at Law 1-866-337-2900 msglegal@comcast.net

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  8. Will my 11 year old son have to go with his father and step-mom in the summer weekly?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Mark S Guralnick
    1 lawyer answer

    These days, courts are working hard to keep fathers in the loop, as long as the father is not a drug user, an alcoholic, a sex offender, or a weapons violator. For years, fathers got the short end of the stick, and the statistics on single mothers raising children alone are gloomy. So, in the last decade or two, fathers have made a significant impact on improving their role as parents -- gaining more custody and visitation time along the way. The wishes of the child are one consideration that...

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  9. Please advise us on what our legal rights are to the matter below, thank you.

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Mark S Guralnick
    1 lawyer answer

    You did not mention where your mother died, or where your brother lives. However, I assume that he was appointed executor of her estate, or that he was named as the administrator of her estate by going to the local court in the state where she died. You have a right to compel him to produce all necessary papers and to file an accounting and inventory of your mother's estate. You can file a "caveat" to be kept on notice of everything he files, and you can file the necessary motion or petition to...

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  10. We need lower payments. Or we will have to move out.

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Mark S Guralnick
    2. Seth Alden Kreiner
    2 lawyer answers

    If you abandon your house, the mortgage company will presumably start foreclosure proceedings at some point. That may harm your credit and impede you ability to buy a new house down the road. If your financial situation is in really bad shape, you may wish to consider bankruptcy. There are a number of laws to protect you these days, even in the event of a foreclosure -- such as mediating a new payment arrangement. Have you talked to other mortgage companies? Good luck. If you felt this...

    1 person marked this answer as helpful