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Cristine Beckwith
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Cristine Beckwith’s Answers

18 total


  • Boyfriend got a DUI several years ago. He can't work because of it judge wants to put him in jail?

    Ok, so he WAS a mechanic. That career is over. No one one will hire a mechanic with no License and a dui. Let alone someone who didn't finish high school no matter how talented he is. So he tried to fall back on his carpentry experience and do tha...

    Cristine’s Answer

    It sounds like your boyfriend was convicted of a DUI and placed on the typical five years of probation. Any of the maximum 364 days he could have spent in jail (if this is a misdemeanor) that he did not actually spend in jail are suspended during his time on probation. (So if he only served 2 days in jail, he has 362 days in jail suspended). In order to keep the jail days suspended, he has to abide by certain conditions. These conditions are usually: not drive without a valid license and insurance, maintain law abiding behavior, obtain an alcohol/drug evaluation, and complete any recommended treatment. If he violates any of these conditions, the judge can un-suspend some of the jail time. If he continues to violate the conditions, the judge can simply sentence him to all the days that were suspended (so potentially 364 days.) Many treatment agencies accept payment plans for low-income patients. Your boyfriend can also look into applying for an ignition interlock license so that he can drive during the time that his license is revoked. A lawyer can help him get things back on track. Best of luck.

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  • How long is jurisdiction in a dui case

    2006 plead guilty to dui. at that time the court to a certain amount of years for jurisdiction. im wondering how long that would have been

    Cristine’s Answer

    Hello, jurisdiction on a DUI is typically five years, however the time can vary depending on if you ever had a warrant out on the case or if you ever agreed to extend jurisdiction in order to complete certain obligations.

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  • Have a pending arraignment in Superior Court on DV, moved out of state and not a resident of WA. Can charges be removed?

    I am unemployed and had been a resident of Seattle less than 90 days when my girlfriend accused me of DV. I am being charged with unlawful imprisonment-dv, assault 4-dv. I was released on PR and also moved back to my home state which is over 1k mi...

    Cristine’s Answer

    Hello, your residency is not relevant to your charge. If the prosecution has sufficient evidence to charge you and sufficient evidence to move forward, it is unlikely that your charges will be dismissed. If you miss the arraignment date, the judge will most likely issue a bench warrant for your arrest. It is in your best interest to return to Washington to hire an attorney to assist you with your case. Good luck.

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  • WA state parents of underage drinking party broken up by police, what can we be charged with?

    first offense, no arrests, nothing confiscated, no tickets, no names taken. Said will mail us our charges. We did not call cops to break it up so we are in trouble cause we did not want anyone leaving intoxicated and were going to feed them and so...

    Cristine’s Answer

    Hello, you could possibly be charged with furnishing liquor to minors under RCW 66.44.270. The charge is gross misdemeanor which carries with it a maximum sentence of 364 days in jail and a $5000 fine. Depending on the facts of the case and your criminal history (which you indicate is nothing), an attorney could most likely negotiate a resolution that results in a reduction or dismissal of the charges.

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  • What happens at a pretrial for a gross misdemeanor?

    If you agree to a plea deal at the pretrial do you have to pay your dues/go to jail immediately at the pretrial?

    Cristine’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    Hello, the pretrial hearing is an opportunity for you or your attorney to speak with the prosecutor about your case and try to negotiate a resolution. In most cases, if you enter into a plea, the judge will give you time to complete certain conditions (like get an alcohol/drug evaluation, complete community service, or pay the fine). The judge will also usually give you a report to jail date to serve your time so that you do not have to be taken into custody that day. Each court is different (and it also depends on the charge and your history), so I would recommend speaking to an attorney before you plead guilty to anything. Best of Luck.

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  • I have a gross misdemeanor charge in WA state. I don't have a criminal history. What can I do to avoid jailtime?

    The charge is for a dispute with a neighbor that lead to a heated argument. I have a concealed weapons permit and keep my gun in the glove compartment. I took it out because I was concerned for my daughter after I saw a larger woman yelling at he...

    Cristine’s Answer

    Hello, if you have been charged with Assault in the 4th degree under RCW 9A.36.041, you could potentially be sentenced to a year in jail and face a $5000 fine. You could also be required to complete anger management classes or report to a probation officer, depending on the facts of the case.
    If you have been charged with unlawful possession of a weapon under RCW 9.41.270, you could be facing a year in jail and a $5000 fine, as well as restrictions on possessing a firearm, even if you currently have a permit.
    An experienced attorney can assist you in raising a self-defense claim to dispute the charges. Best of luck.

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  • Just moved to washington from hawaii i got an domestic violence-4th degree assault

    it is my first offense as an adult. my wife wants to drop charges but its in da state hand

    Cristine’s Answer

    Hello, the charge of Assault in the fourth degree carries with it a maximum sentence of 364 days in jail and a $5000 fine. In addition, you may face firearm possession restrictions, probation, and treatment requirements. Unfortunately, your wife cannot control whether charges are filed are not. Once the prosecutor's office receives the police report, they will have the ultimate determination on whether or not charges are filed. You should contact an experienced attorney who can assist you in your defense. Best of luck.

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  • I need to get a misdemeanor expungement in washington seattle how to do that.

    traffic violation

    Cristine’s Answer

    Hello, there are several rules for getting a conviction vacated. For example, you must not have any pending charges, you must have no subsequent convictions, the crime you are seeking to vacate must not have been a violent offense, crime against persons or DUI/physical control, and a certain amount of time must have passed. Some felonies and other crimes are not eligible to be vacated at all. You should contact an attorney to assist you with the process. Best of luck.

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  • Can a charge be dismissed if the police did not read you your Miranda Rights?

    I was questioned and arrested for an assault on a person with whom I had a disagreement over finances. I did not assault him, but we had a loud argument. There were no witnesses and he accused me of assaulting him, and said that I put a cut on...

    Cristine’s Answer

    Miranda warnings inform defendants of their right to remain silent and their right to an attorney. They are designed to protect a defendant’s right not to make incriminating statements while in the potentially coercive environment of police interrogation. A defendant is entitled to receive Miranda warnings only when he is in custody and subject to interrogation. If you were interrogated after your arrest without being advised of your Miranda rights, it may be possible for your statements to be suppressed. You should contact an attorney who can file the appropriate motions in court. Best of luck.

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  • Pulled for DUI on 10/5, and taken to the Bellevue St. Patrol - where I tested at .064/.066 - will this likely get prosecuted?

    1st time ever for DUI, and I was not drunk or "buzzed" at the time. Field sobriety test was done on a hillside - difficult to keep balance. Blew .081 on the field tester, but way less 45 mins later on the calibrated machine. Should never have been...

    Cristine’s Answer

    Hello, you can be charged with a DUI if (1) you blow over .08 OR (2) you were affected by alcohol/drugs. This means that you can be charged with a DUI even if you are under the legal limit. If you were driving poorly or performed poorly on the field sobriety tests, the prosecutor may charge you. As an alternative to DUI, the prosecutor could also charge you with Negligent Driving in the 1st degree. It is in your best interest to contact an attorney. Best of Luck

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