Annie Noelle Arbenz’s Answers

Annie Noelle Arbenz

Tacoma Estate Planning Attorney.

Contributor Level 8
  1. Inherited land with no will. How to transfer deed?

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Ruth Elaine McMahon
    2. Mitchell Allan Port
    3. Annie Noelle Arbenz
    4. Matthew Erik Johnson
    5. David L. Carrier
    5 lawyer answers

    Unfortunately, even though you are the only daughter, you are required to open a probate with the superior court to be able to properly transfer the property into your name. I would be happy to talk about the particulars with you and what a straightforward probate would cost to administer.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  2. My husband passed 11 yrs ago and I'm having difficulties transferring title into my name. What does it take?

    Answered 12 months ago.

    1. Justin Eric Elder
    2. Annie Noelle Arbenz
    3. William Henry Charbonneau IV
    4. Jennifer Frere Volk
    5. David W. Meyer
    5 lawyer answers

    The quickest way to deal with it would be to record with the county auditor a community property agreement, if you have one. It's possible that you will have to open a probate to clear title so that it is just in your name.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  3. How can I find my deceased stepmother's will (or a community property agreement by her and my father, who is still living)?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Annie Noelle Arbenz
    2. Steven J. Fromm
    2 lawyer answers

    You should check the records of the auditor in the county where your stepmother resided when she died. Often, when the surviving spouse is the sole beneficiary, a Community Property Agreement is recorded with the county auditor in lieu of a full-blown probate. Also, attorneys have various resources available to them to track down estate planning documents. Good luck!

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  4. Probate-After the 4 months have passed...

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Annie Noelle Arbenz
    2. Ralph Maimon
    2 lawyer answers

    This is tricky. You need to be sure that each creditor received proper notice and that enough time as has passed since that notice was sent. Technically, if the creditor fails to file a claim within the four months OR within 30 days after the notice was sent, the claim is barred. It depends on the nature of the claim and whether sufficient notice was given. I wouldn't ignore these claims unless you are positive each is barred under RCW 11.40.051. Even then, I would recommend contacting...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  5. I need to know how to become an Estate Representive for my diceased mother who had no will.

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Annie Noelle Arbenz
    2. Robert E. Millsap III
    3. David L. Carrier
    4. James P. Frederick
    4 lawyer answers

    I'm sorry to hear about your mother's passing. There seem to be a lot of issues floating around (international law, trusts, estates, etc.) but you are asking all the right questions. To effectively collect debts on behalf of a deceased person, you need to start a probate. It sounds like it would be relatively straightforward, so if you want to discuss what it would cost, please feel free to give me a call and we can discuss.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  6. Probate/should I hire a Lawyer?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Annie Noelle Arbenz
    2. Jeffrey Edward Burkhart
    3. Michael I Burstein
    3 lawyer answers

    Hiring a lawyer to handle only the creditor claims aspect of a probate is rare and difficult because the process is, as I am sure you have noticed, very involved and has many moving parts. The process to deal with each creditor's claim is governed by statute and must be followed carefully. I can't tell from your question whether the estate has a strong negotiating position or not. Among other things, this determination depends on whether notice of the probate was published, whether/when...

    2 people marked this answer as helpful

  7. Probate notice delivery problems

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Annie Noelle Arbenz
    2. Richard Wills
    3. Elizabeth Rankin Powell
    3 lawyer answers

    Because you sent actual notice to the creditor, you should file an affidavit of mailing with the court to evidence that it was sent; you don't have to prove it was received under statute. Assuming the creditor is reasonably ascertainable (i.e., one you discovered while reviewing the decedent's mail, financial information, etc.), it/he/she has thirty days from the date of mailing or four months from the date of first publication to file a claim in the probate. If a claim is not timely filed,...

    2 people marked this answer as helpful

  8. How do you transfer a home after the death of your parent

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. C Dennis Brislawn Jr
    2. Annie Noelle Arbenz
    3. Michael S. Haber
    4. Stephen Craig Hinze
    5 lawyer answers

    I'm sorry to hear about your mom and I am impressed that you have handled the administration of her estate thursfar - a difficult job. You will need a deed to transfer the home out of your mom's name. Depending on the circumstances, an attorney might use a simple quitclaim deed, but usually it will be a more complex fiduciary deed will be used, which seeks to protect you as the administrator. Because your audience is comprised of lawyers, you can probably guess that we would recommend you...

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  9. My Dad died 12 years ago in Washington State

    Answered almost 4 years ago.

    1. Annie Noelle Arbenz
    2. Jamie Corrine Clausen
    3. Steven J. Fromm
    4. Eliz C A Johnson
    4 lawyer answers

    As suggested below, you should definitely get involved and, due to the nature of the case, you should discuss the case with an attorney so he/she can assess what claims you have, if any, against your sister, and what you're entitled to from your dad's estate.

  10. Probate/creditors claims

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Annie Noelle Arbenz
    1 lawyer answer

    Sometimes it is advisable to obtain a release from the creditor after you have paid the claim. Then, you would file that release with the court, establishing that the claim has been paid. This isn't always necessary and, if you have legal counsel, he/she should let you know if it is something you should do. If obtaining/filing a release isn't necessary, simply sending a check to the creditor is sufficient to pay the claim. I would keep track of when/how it was paid and maybe even keep a...

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