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Latife Helen Neu

Latife Neu’s Answers

73 total


  • My employer is garnishing my wage from student loan . do employer have duties under fdcpa.

    Had a loan from fedloan serv.in 2011. Did not complete school. Loan defaulted. Credit report states permanently assinged to dept of ed. West asset. Began collections. I disputed asked verification. I asked Ed telephonic hearing. Then i received...

    Latife’s Answer

    You need to learn your options and deal with this. Without action on your part, the federal government can and will continue the garnishment, and will seize your tax refunds, until your student loans (and collection fees, etc.) are paid off. Contact a student loan lawyer to discuss your situation.

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  • Can a business file negative credit report on me, and continue to add late fees, they claim I owe them money and I disagree.

    I enrolled my 5 yr old daughter in swim class.I prepaid for 2 months of classes, 30 min twice a week.I stopped taking her after 3classes because my daughter cried and got very upset before each class.I did not ask for any money back I figured I wa...

    Latife’s Answer

    You have three problems. First, you have this snowballing obligation accruing against you. Take five minutes to do whatever you have to do to officially put them on notice that you do not intend to re-enroll, and briefly stating how long it has been since you verbally let them know of your intent to withdraw. Mail the cancellation with proof of receipt and keep a copy. Second, you have a creditor coming after you. You might be able to make a deal to get it paid for less than you owe, and maybe if you explain what happened, the company would be willing to update their credit reporting to remove the default. Hopefully they understand that there is value in keeping former clients happy; parents rely heavily on word of mouth and recommendations from other parents. Third, you have a credit issue. You can dispute the debt with a letter to the reporting agencies. If you take action now, this will not get to the point where you need a lawyer. Good luck to you!

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  • What do I do?

    First of all, I am so embarrassed to even write this. However, I met a guy off of a "sugar daddy" website. We hung out and afterwards agreed on a monthly "allowance" via email which he then transferred over to me. We hung out once more but I'm jus...

    Latife’s Answer

    I agree with Mr. Alexander that your best bet for now is probably to ignore him unless he sues you (in which case you have to defend yourself) or gets scary (restraining order). If you want to be proactive, you could hire a lawyer to write him a letter telling him you don't owe him anything and demanding he not contact you again. Good luck to you.

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  • Can you back out of Ch 7 if you find out that your family home will be sold by trustee?

    MOm in a divorce and trying to stave off the threat of ex filing pre or post divorce. I want to file first and try to save the home but can I back out if there is just too much equity in the home to save from the trustee? I'll do anything to sav...

    Latife’s Answer

    With property values going crazy here in Seattle, you have reason to be worried. While a simple chapter 7 is possible to do without an attorney, I think you are in a position where you need an attorney to frame your case and advise you regarding the risks. In the mean time, you might ask a realtor in your area to prepare a market analysis for you, so you have a reasonable idea of your equity position. You are under a lot of pressure with the ex, the kids, worrying about marital debt, and trying to keep the house. Take some time to find the right bankruptcy attorney and figure out your options.

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  • I filed Chap. 13 a year ago but will soon lose my job. How soon after I lose my job may I file Chapter 7 in WA state?

    If I withdraw all cash from checking account can that still be taken?

    Latife’s Answer

    Since a chapter 13 from last year will not have resulted in a discharge (whether that case is open now or has been dismissed), there should not be any reason you cannot pursue a chapter 7 discharge, assuming you qualify in terms of income. Your employment status also does not determine whether you can file a bankruptcy, though your current and recent income does. Timing of your filing will depend on a lot of factors, and should be the subject of conversations with an experienced bankruptcy attorney.

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  • We paid our ch13 in full, now what?

    Do we need to file anything through the courts or does the ch13 Trustee file for us? Our original attorney no longer exists and our files were given to another firm. We would like to know what the closing process is. Thank you.

    Latife’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    There is a declaration you have to fill out regarding domestic support obligations, and you need to complete your Financial Education course, if you have not already done so. Look on the bankruptcy court's website, http://www.wawb.uscourts.gov/, for info on these two requirements. Then I'd recommend you give the trustee's office a call and try to speak with the case manager; explain how you have ended up pro se over the course of your bankruptcy. In my experience, the trustee's office wants to help debtors successfully conclude their cases after making their required Plan payments. Congratulations on completing your chapter 13.

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  • Being sued by credit card co for debt from 1999. Have set up payment plan w/their Attny but have not paid them any money yet.

    Do I have any other options but to pay them? What can they do to me if I don't ? Already at my limit financially paying off Medical bills!

    Latife’s Answer

    This debt may be past the statute of limitations and uncollectable. Don't make a payment until you are sure it is still your legal responsibility-- it sounds like you are already stretched too thin financially. I agree with my colleagues who advise that you might want to look at your debt situation as a whole, and consider the option of bankruptcy. Good luck to you.

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  • Concerning Springleaf loan, possible collections and divorce...

    A little background: I had a loan with Beneficial - it became Springleaf. I have gotten several payments behind, and at the moment cannot catch up. It was a joint loan with my (then) husband, but we are now divorced. Could they garnish wages of on...

    Latife’s Answer

    In my experience, you are dealing with an aggressive creditor, so you should be proactive in deciding how to proceed. Assuming you do not cure the default, the creditor eventually will almost surely sue you and your ex. If you both took on the debt, it can be collected against either of you in your separate capacity (including through garnishment of your wages, etc), once the creditor gets a judgment against you. Depending on your overall debt situation, bankruptcy may be a good option to reset your financial life. Consult with an experienced attorney regarding your options.

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  • I just got served legal papers for a medical bill I just recently learned about. Any advise on how to deal with this.

    They were sending the bills to the wrong address and I never knew about it until it was already sent to an attorney. I tried to set up payment arrangements and was laughed at. They said I have to pay it all upfront or will proceed with legal actio...

    Latife’s Answer

    If you are not getting anywhere with negotiating a payment plan, you might have more luck if an attorney negotiates for you. As a general rule, you should take steps to respond to the suit to avoid a judgment being taken. Spending an hour talking to a lawyer about your specific situation would be a good way to understand which option would be best for you-- negotiate a payment plan, file for bankruptcy, or do nothing. Good luck to you.

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  • I need to get an experience lawyer in the area of bankruptcy. Please contact me at suyos1@gmail.com Angel Leon

    I have no choice but to try to file a bankrupcy on my student loans.

    Latife’s Answer

    You should research bankruptcy attorneys with experience in student loan discharge actions, then meet to discuss your specific situation to understand whether you have any chance of success going this route. Assuming a bankruptcy discharge is not viable (because this is a difficult case to make), there may be other options that would ease the burden of your loans, such income-driven payment plans or loan forgiveness programs. If you are in default, you should look into rehabilitation plans. I do lot of student loan work; please feel free to call me.

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