Susan Lee Beecher’s Answers

Susan Lee Beecher

Kent Family Law Attorney.

Contributor Level 13
  1. How do I fire the co-founder of my startup?

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Susan Lee Beecher
    2. Robert Daniel Kelly
    3. Peter Jay Wilke
    4. Bryant Keith Martin
    4 lawyer answers

    This person is in an ambiguous position in the company. If you have not been paying him, he is presumably an owner (shareholder, since you are a corporation.) There are really two separate issues here. One is employment at the company (i.e., can you stop him from working there?) and the other is ownership interest (once he leaves, will he still own a share of your company?) The two questions must be addressed separately You are getting answers to this question that are "all over the map"...

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  2. QDRO amended to clarify marriage dates

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. Susan Lee Beecher
    2. J. Richard Kulerski
    2 lawyer answers

    This is arguably a clerical error, so you may be able to get this fixed on motion under CR 60(a). If not, you will have to move to vacate and enter a new order under 60(b). As you can no doubt prove the date of your marriage and the date you began to accrue your pension, you have a good argument that the outcome is the result of clerical error and does not reflect the original intention of the parties. However, this must be done within one year of the date the court signed the order. No one...

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  3. Discrimination in compensation, threats and workplace intimidation.

    Answered almost 6 years ago.

    1. Susan Lee Beecher
    1 lawyer answer

    You're in a tough spot. As a practical matter, it is very difficult to bring a legal action against your current employer. While strictly speaking, they should not retaliate against you for bringing the legal complaint, you and I both know that chances are that they will. You can add the retaliation issue to your lawsuit, but meanwhile, you will be either in a very uncomfortable working environment, or out of a job altogether. It then becomes very difficult to find a new job, because when...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

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  4. I work in a well known hotel in Seattle WA, and want to know if my experience constitutes a hostile work enviornment?

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. Susan Lee Beecher
    2. Alan James Brinkmeier
    2 lawyer answers

    The Washington State laws covering reasonable accomodation for disabled workers is a lot more employee friendly than the federal ADA. This is probably why the attorney from Illinois did not have anything helpful to say. Based on what you have written here, I believe you DO have a hostile work environment. The devil is always in the details, so I can't really give you a "100% yes" answer, but it sounds like you have several things going on (failure to provide reasonable accomodation, failure...

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  5. Collecting lost wages from last employer.

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Susan Lee Beecher
    2. Abraham J. Ritter
    2 lawyer answers

    I would encourage you not to run this through small claims court. If your employer intentionally withheld wages from you and you prevail in court, the employer will get to pay you double what it owes you plus your attorney's fees. I would suggest you work with an employment law attorney to resolve this. The attorney will likely first write a demand letter, which may clear things up quickly without having to go to court. If that doesn't work, and the case is fairly straight forward, it may...

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  6. If I am a salaried EE but work over 60hrs hours per week which is not compensated. Do I have recourse?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Susan Lee Beecher
    2. Thuong-Tri Nguyen
    2 lawyer answers

    I will add to the previous attorney's answer by remarking that many employers seem to believe that if an employee is salaried, they are also exempt (not entitled to overtime). This is not correct. Whether you are exempt is dependent upon your job description, not whether you are paid by the hour or on salary. You are in a tough spot. If you find that you have been entitled to overtime, but have not been receiving it, you can lodge a complaint with the Dept of Labor and Industries. By law,...

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  7. My business Partner with the financial investment want out of the business. How do I respond to his unreasonable demands?

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Samuel Michael Meyler
    2. Richard W Beck
    3. Susan Lee Beecher
    3 lawyer answers

    The answers so far have been good, but I would like to add one more thought. If this is truly a partnership (and not an LLC or corporation), all partners have certain obligations to the partnership and could share in liability personally if contracts aren't filled. With the others, I would encourage you to consult with an attorney quickly and allow the attorney to read the partnership agreement from beginning to end. Good luck/

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  8. My job owes me thousands in back wages what can i do?.

    Answered almost 4 years ago.

    1. Susan Lee Beecher
    2. Andrew Daniel Myers
    2 lawyer answers

    Under Washington law, you are entitled to double damages and attorneys fees if your employer intentionally withholds pay due to you. I suggest you go talk to an employment law attorney. Many will do an initial consultation for free. You will want to talk to an attorney before you take further steps because it may be that you are receiving compensation in some other form (e.g. free housing) and would not have a case. There are other specifics that an attorney would also need to check into....

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  9. What does "through no fault of your own" mean re WA state unemployment?

    Answered almost 5 years ago.

    1. Susan Lee Beecher
    1 lawyer answer

    Yes, I understand what you are asking. "Through no fault of your own" means not due to misconduct, but it's helpful to look at the question in terms of, "could the employee have prevented the problem?" Certainly, drinking on the job and the other examples you cite will be misconduct, and the discharged employee had better not count on unemployment compensation. But other types of less serious conduct will also me misconduct, such as insubordination to the worker's supervisor, arriving late to...

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  10. Can employer with hold wages after firing

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Susan Lee Beecher
    1 lawyer answer

    You have two options. The first is to contact the Dept of Labor & Industries. This process is slow and many clients have complained to me that it is ineffective. It has the advantage of being free of charge. The second option is to have an attorney write a demand letter for you, pointing out that the employer will be liable for double damages and attorney's fees if you have to take legal action. This usually shakes the money loose unless the employer simply has no money. You could also...

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