Justin Dain Hein’s Answers

Justin Dain Hein

Sacramento Administrative Law Lawyer.

Contributor Level 9
  1. Name change

    Answered over 6 years ago.

    1. Justin Dain Hein
    2. Sandra Dee Munoz
    2 lawyer answers

    Name Changes are filed in District Court, in the county where your daughter resides. Generally, a Petition for Name Change and an Order for Name Change must be completed. You will need to contact the District Court in the county where you reside in order to obtain the needed forms. Contact information for all County Courts is available in the Washington Court Directory (see below). Name Change fees vary depending upon the county and possibly on the number of persons named on the...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  2. Cost basis

    Answered over 6 years ago.

    1. Mace Abdullah
    2. David J Merrigan
    3. Justin Dain Hein
    3 lawyer answers

    The cost basis is simply the money you paid when you bought the security, including any commissions that you paid to acquire that security. If you accumulated stock over the course of many purchases, the total cost basis is still just the cost of all the purchases including commissions. But be mindful of reinvested dividends. If a stock paid dividends and the dividends were reinvested, computation of the cost basis will require some work. All reinvested dividends need to be added to the cost...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  3. Underpaid taxes

    Answered over 6 years ago.

    1. Mace Abdullah
    2. Justin Dain Hein
    3. Bruce Givner
    3 lawyer answers

    I applaud my above colleagues answer. To reiterate, yes, the IRS can technically take your house away. However, the IRS only engages in such ridiculous behavior when the tax liability is similarly ridiculous in size. Typically, they will file a federal tax lien against you home, which acts as a second mortgage, preventing you from realizing the gain on the sale of the property without the IRS first receiving their take. The lien will stay in place until the liability is paid in full or it...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  4. Tax Law

    Answered over 6 years ago.

    1. Shelly Crocker
    2. Justin Dain Hein
    2 lawyer answers

    As mentioned by my colleague, most taxes are not covered by bankruptcy. Especially when the bankruptcy is filed for an individual and the taxes are owed by a defunct corporation. Undoubtedly, the IRS Revenue Officer is looking to assess a Trust Fund Recovery Penalty (TFRP) against you personally for your corporation's failure to make payroll deposits. The Revenue Officer has to go through an extensive investigation to determine who is liable for the failure to make payroll deposits. Once...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  5. Insurance proceeds

    Answered over 6 years ago.

    1. Lawrence Neil Rogak
    2. Justin Dain Hein
    2 lawyer answers

    The main factor is whether or not you received more or less than what the stolen property was worth. If you received more, you have a gain. This may be taxable or it can be passed on into future years. If you received less, you have a loss. This may be deductible, assuming if it was insured, you made a timely claim for all of the insurance. You will need to complete an IRS Form 4684 (attached below) in order to make that determination. In addition, please read the instructions for the form (...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  6. Claiming tips

    Answered over 6 years ago.

    1. Donald W. Heyrich
    2. Justin Dain Hein
    2 lawyer answers

    All tips you receive are income and are subject to federal income tax. You must include in gross income all tips you receive directly, charged tips paid to you by your employer, and your share of any tips you receive under a tip-splitting or tip-pooling arrangement. The value of noncash tips, such as tickets, passes, or other items of value are also income and subject to tax. Reporting your tip income correctly is not difficult. Just remember three things: 1) Keep a daily tip record 2)...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  7. WA State and IRS tax problems due to being put out of business by competitors hiring illegal workers.

    Answered over 6 years ago.

    1. Sharon Elizabeth Chirichillo
    2. Lawrence Neil Rogak
    3. Justin Dain Hein
    3 lawyer answers

    Well, working under the table is just going to exacerbate your current problem with both Washington and the IRS. It is going to result in you owing taxes every year moving forward. As mentioned above by my colleagues, you really need to speak with a Tax Attorney whose focus is Tax Debt Resolution. They can review your financial situation to see what type of debt resolution programs you qualify for. For the IRS, the might be an Offer in Compromise (i.e. settlement), Installment Agreement (i....

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  8. Lottery winnings

    Answered over 6 years ago.

    1. Douglas Jay Lineberry
    2. Phillip Gustavo Day
    3. Justin Dain Hein
    4. David J Merrigan
    4 lawyer answers

    Once you won the scratcher ticket, it became income. Thus, it is a taxable event.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  9. Ex-husband and IRS debt

    Answered over 6 years ago.

    1. Mark Douglas Kimball
    2. Justin Dain Hein
    3 lawyer answers

    Excuse me, that would be Form 8857. I apologize for my typo.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  10. Unconstitutional taxation

    Answered over 6 years ago.

    1. Douglas Jay Lineberry
    2. Frank A Selden
    3. Lawrence Neil Rogak
    4. Michael Emory Clark
    5. Justin Dain Hein
    6. ···
    6 lawyer answers

    Here is a great website that refutes all of the most common "tax protestor" arguments: http://evans-legal.com/dan/tpfaq.html

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

916-789-9800