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Robert A Wyrick

Robert Wyrick’s Answers

3 total

  • Travel while on summary/informal probation.

    I have a misdemeanor conviction for petty theft. I have already paid all my fines. I am on 2 years summary probation. I want to leave the country for 3 months to go visit my family in Hong Kong. I have a U.S passport. Will have any problem if ...

    Robert’s Answer

    Ask your probation officer! These people have such an incredibly packed workload, with people that pose an actual risk to society, that a simple question like that would be a breath of fresh, logical air. He or she isn't going to violate you for asking whether or not it's OK to leave the country or not. If you're worried, ask the question in the hypothetical, or anonymously. If you were to call and ask probation if it's OK to go see family in Hong Kong it would show that you are trying to comply with your terms of probation, a responsible thing to do. Whatever they tell you, obey. When in doubt, ask! I wish you well.

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  • I Failed to Appear for a Traffic ticket in Los Angeles 18 years ago. Do I have a bench warrant. How do I fix this?

    About 18 years ago, I got a traffic ticket for not signaling on a right turn. I forgot to appear in court. 18 years later, I'm a professional in Kentucky. Does this mean I have a bench warrant in the state of California? Why hasn't this shown ...

    Robert’s Answer

    Yes, you probably do have an outstanding warrant, even with the time that has elapsed. Obviously, they're not going to send a bounty hunter to KY to hunt you down for an old traffic ticket, and it would most likely not show up on a search from another state. The simplest way to find out is to call the court in the county where you got the ticket and ask a clerk if the FTA warrant is still on record and if it is, what to do to take care of it. If you're friendly, the court clerks are generally very helpful. They deal with grouchy people and snotty attorneys all day long, so a little kindness to a court clerk goes a long, long way. It is ALWAYS better to attempt to take care of it yourself than to find out about it after being pulled over for something else. I wish you well.

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  • My funds are limited. Should I use a public defender? Court case in January

    My wife was arrested for DUI last night about 8:00 P.M. while driving to McDonald's for dinner. Cop said she swerved into bike lane. Son age 13 was passenger in front seat. My wife doesn't drink. My son didn't notice any swerving. She was given th...

    Robert’s Answer

    Many Public Defenders, or PD's, are great attorneys. The main difference between a PD and a private attorney is the incredible workload piled on PD's, for which they get paid a flat salary. Especially with recent budget cuts, PD's have many more cases to handle without an increase in pay to go along with the additional cases. In any job, that's stressful. PD's, as much as they'd like to, unfortunately don't have the time to dig into the issues as deeply as a private attorney. Like most things in life, you get what you pay for - usually. Based on the details of your wife's arrest, it appears that you have some good facts to support a defense. It would definitely be worth your time to at least meet with some private attorneys to discuss her case before you make the decision one way or the other. I wish you and your wife the best.

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