Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff’s Answers

Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff

Los Angeles Immigration Attorney.

Contributor Level 11
  1. If an inmate is a US citizen can he have an INS hold?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Samuel Patrick Ouya Maina
    2. Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff
    3. J. Thomas Smith Ph.D.
    4. Ingrid Arnalda Morfa
    4 lawyer answers

    No!!! Does ICE know he is a U.S. citizen?

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  2. What kind of a visa would be required to be a CEO and partner in a new startup company?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Carl Michael Shusterman
    2. Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff
    3. Todd Matthew Heine
    4. Luca Cristiano Maria Melchionna
    4 lawyer answers

    Startups are challenging - unless there's a lot of financial backing. You really need to do this right. If you screw up you can make it very difficult for yourself to get a visa in the future. There are many factors to consider. Many, I'm sure you would not want to post on a public site. Spend the bucks and get a qualified immigration lawyer instead of asking for fee advice on a public website! Probably I'll get in trouble for saying that. (I don't mind giving fee advice...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  3. Scheduled for the marriage interview, Does my citizen husband need birth certificate?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Carl Michael Shusterman
    2. Alexander Joseph Segal
    3. Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff
    4. Irene Vaisman
    5. J Charles Ferrari
    6. ···
    6 lawyer answers

    Your husband only has to prove he is a U.S. citizen, so his U.S. passport or naturalization document is sufficient. If he had been born a U.S. citizen, then his birth certificate would also be acceptable. Maybe this is what your friend did.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  4. How to file a Motion to Reconsider with an overseas U.S. Consulate?

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. Carl Michael Balediata
    2. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    3. Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff
    4. Jeffrey Adam Devore
    4 lawyer answers

    Appeals on I-130 are filed with the BIA (Board of Immigration Appeals). If there is not a "legal" issue (as opposed to "facts") you can file a new I-130 petition - which may be less expensive. I would strongly advise you to retain a qualified immigration lawyer since it is somewhat unusual for an I-130 petition to be denied if it is properly documented and the petition is bonafide. Ron Tasoff Certified Immigration Law Specialist* Law Offices of Tasoff and Tasoff 16255 Ventura Blvd....

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  5. How can i marry illegal immigrant?

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Robert Edward Myers
    2. Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff
    3. Deborah Lynne Karapetian
    4. Veronica Tunitsky
    4 lawyer answers

    Basically, the fact that your fiancee is an overstayed tourist has nothing to do with her right to get married here. You just do what everyone else does - get a marriage license and get married Assuming you aren't currently married to someone else!). Assuming you are a U.S. citizen, most likely she would be eligible to apply for and receive a green card based on your marriage here in the U.S. and will not need to travel abroad - which is what would be required if she did not originally come...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  6. Can I keep my status and apply for citizenship.

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff
    2. Andrea Felice Szew
    3. J Charles Ferrari
    3 lawyer answers

    Assuming it was a bona-fide marriage and you have your "10 year" green card you can get a divorce without worrying about your immigration status. Instead of being eligible to apply for naturalization in 3 years you will have to wait until 5 years have passed from getting your green card to apply for naturalization (note you can apply 3 months early). Ron Tasoff Certified Immigration Law Specialist* Law Offices of Tasoff and Tasoff 16255 Ventura Blvd. Suite 1000 Encino, California 91436 (...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  7. How long do the finger prints stay in the system if you were caught crossing the border?

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff
    2. J Charles Ferrari
    3. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    3 lawyer answers

    Forever.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  8. On form I-765 are they asking for only real SSN numbers assigned to the applicant by the social security administration?

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff
    2. Marilynn Mika Spencer
    3. J Craig Fong
    3 lawyer answers

    It appears that they are requesting ALL social security numbers a "requester" has used. However, although the case law is unclear, there are cases in which knowingly using a false social security number is a crime (possibly identity theft - although the U.S. Supreme Court has said that it is not when used in the context of a person using a randomly made up number for immigration purposes). Note that this is a new question on the form (requiring ANY numbers used). One possibility...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  9. Can i do finger prints from a different state incase my appoint comes up when am away from my state?

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff
    2. Robert West
    3. Luis Alberto Guerra
    3 lawyer answers

    I'm not sure if you can go to a different Application Support Center (ASC). However, my clients have never had a problem with going to the ASC before their scheduled appointment date as long as they have the original appointment letter (and identification). Ron Tasoff Certified Immigration Law Specialist* Law Offices of Tasoff and Tasoff 16255 Ventura Blvd. Suite 1000 Encino, California 91436 (818) 788-8900 ron@tasoff.com www.tasoff.com

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  10. Potential Consequences of being out of status for less than 6 months?

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Ronald Jeffrey Tasoff
    2. Stephen D. Berman
    3. F. J. Capriotti III
    3 lawyer answers

    I think you may be confused about the difference between "unlawful presence" and being "out of status" (or "maintaining nonimmigrant status"). And who isn't??? You are technically "out of status" because you are not working for the employer who petitioned for your H-1B status and you have not "ported" (is that a real word???) to a new employer. You have technically no maintained your nonimmigrant status - like an F-1 student who doesn't go to classes for the required time necessary for a "...

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