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Lisa Bloom

Lisa Bloom’s Answers

11 total


  • Is it child negligence/child endangerment to allow your two year old child to play outside unsupervised?

    We live in a residential neighborhood but by no means is it safe. Its not gate locked so cars tend to pass frequently. I noticed my sister in laws child playing in his bike alone outside and hes only two years old. There is a clear danger if he wo...

    Lisa’s Answer

    Times have changed dramatically! When I was a kid, we all played outside unsupervised by adults until dark. Today, parents keep a tight leash on even 17 year olds. While child protective workers will look at all the facts and circumstances when a child is unattended -- is he in his own front yard? Can mom keep an eye on him out the window? Is the neighborhood safe? -- I think most would agree that two years old is too young to play outside unattended. Kidnapping is less of a risk than him putting something unhealthy in his mouth, falling down, or wandering off. So in my opinion, yes, this is child endangerment.
    Please talk to your sister-in-law about your concerns to protect that little boy! Thanks for caring.

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  • What jobs can I get with my conviction of my first and only offense?

    I had a traumatic life experience. I attempted to break up with my ex-girlfriend, and she disagreed with my decision. When I attempted to leave my apartment for work, she became combative. Somehow, I was able to escape. When I returned home fr...

    Lisa’s Answer

    Hello, Riverside!
    I am sorry to hear about what you have gone through. Unfortunately, once you have pleaded guilty to a felony, it is on your record. Employers can and often do ask whether you have been convicted of a crime, and you must answer that question honestly. If you have the opportunity you can explain to the potential employer that it was your first and only offense, that you did not do it but felt you had to plead guilty, and that you are not a violent person, if that is true.
    Employers do not have to hire you with that conviction. It's tough getting a job once you have to "check the box" that you have committed a crime. You may also be denied certain professional licenses.
    It's very important that you comply with every law during the time of your probation so this situation does not get worse.
    Good luck to you and I'm sorry I didn't have better news for you here. Next time always consult with an attorney before pleading guilty to any crime.

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  • I want to marry my boyfriend. But I don't want my spousal support to stop from my former 30 year old marriage. How can I do that

    I worked hard during that first marriage, and I feel I earned that money. I love my new fiancee and I don't really think it's fair that my ex can re-marry without any consequences, but I can't. If I went to another country, could I get married the...

    Lisa’s Answer

    Hello, Cool, CA!
    I understand where you're coming from. I am sure that you did work hard during your long marriage, and you feel betrayed by your ex. There were probably two parts to your divorce judgment: the division of property, and spousal support (alimony). The first is not affected by your remarriage. The second probably is. Read that judgment carefully because it probably says that your spousal support terminates upon your remarriage. I wouldn't fool around with getting married outside the US. That just gives your ex an argument that you are remarried and spousal support should cease.
    So, you will likely have to decide between keeping those spousal support payments and marrying your fiance. The good news is, you have found love again. Good for you. Congratulations and good luck!

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  • Buying out a business partner with no signed paperwork and only verbal agreement

    I have a business partner whom I started a small business with, under a verbal agreement to 50% ownership for each of us. He invested 4,000, I invested 12,000 as our startup capital. All business licenses, bank accounts, credit cards, email addr...

    Lisa’s Answer

    Hello, Los Angeles!
    The problem a court would have is that you do not have a written agreement. I would suggest you email him and mention that you and he always agreed to 50-50 ownership, even though you invested more money and everything is in your name.
    On the other hand, since everything is in your name and there is no written agreement, you are in the stronger position here, because he's the one who has no documentation that this was to be a partnership rather than say, he was an investor in your company.
    Before you send an email or do anything further, I strongly suggest you consult with an attorney to review all the facts here, so that you can determine what your rights are and what your best strategy is. Perhaps this is a partnership, perhaps not, and that will have a significant effect on what you offer him.
    Good luck, and in the future, document everything in your business dealings. Congratulations on the success of your business.

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  • Any advice on what to say while in court? Will i appear in front of a judge? What is going to happen?

    I have a court date for child support. My baby is now 2 years old & father has not been there at all. He is currently having more kids & caring for them. Just want to know what should & should not be said. Am I allowed to have a lawyer?

    Lisa’s Answer

    Hello, Los Angeles!
    Yes, you will be appearing before a judge. Yes, you may bring a lawyer, and you should, if possible.
    Before you go in, review all the income and expense information information for you and your baby's father. Child support hearings can be emotional, but if you want to win over the judge, stay calm and stick to the facts. The judge doesn't want to hear about all the issues in your relationship, why you split up, how he's a lousy dad, etc. Your baby's father, sadly, is not required to spend time with his own child. Legally, he is only required to pay child support. So, stick to that. Explain your financial situation. Be honest, brief and direct in answering the judge's questions.
    I am sorry that your baby's father is so irresponsible, but your baby is lucky to have you.
    Hang in there and good luck!

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  • What act can I take if I found pics of my soon 2 b xhusband exposing himself,nude female and pics of my son not in the same pics

    But in the same photo file on my ex's profile.I dnt know what he's doing or who he's sendin pics to my concern is for my son.he delete the pics as soon as I confronted him so I cnt prove it except for our txts.

    Lisa’s Answer

    Hello, Visalia. Thanks for submitting your question.
    I am very concerned, and I think you should be too. It is possible this is all innocent -- naked pictures of an adult male and adult female just happen to be in the same file as pictures of your (presumably minor) son. However, when he deleted the pictures after you confronted him, that suggests "consciousness of guilt" to me.
    Save those texts, because they are evidence.
    Ask your son calmly and straightforwardly if anything has happened at Dad's that's made him uncomfortable. Has he seen any pictures at Dad's that are unusual? Does he know this woman? Ask open ended questions, and don't suggest an answer. Don't freak out at his answers, either. Just calmly, and with an open mind, gather information. If your son indicates that he's seen any pornography or inappropriate sexual conduct, stop questioning him and take him immediately to the police for an interview there.
    I would definitely bring this to the attention of the family law court.
    Good luck to you and your son. Thank you for being alert to protect him.

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  • In a small claim court, can a judge award more than what plaintiff asked for?

    I filed a small claim court against a person in $1,000 amount for a car accident. Later, i received new information that my lost is much higher than i previously thought in the amount of $2,000. If i go to court, can judge to award me the highe...

    Lisa’s Answer

    Generally, no. It's not fair to the defendant, because they are on notice that you are suing for a particular amount, and now you're asking for more. So your best option is to withdraw your complaint without prejudice (which means you can sue the same person again for the same thing) and refile; or amend your complaint if the court will allow that. Make sure you bring copies of all your records when you go to court on your hearing date, as they judge will ask why you changed the amount of your claim.
    Good luck!

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  • Can harassment be nosiness?

    If someone asks me nosy questions does this amount to harassment?

    Lisa’s Answer

    Hello, Los Angeles!
    "Harassment" has a particular legal meaning, different from the general idea that someone is harassing you when they're just being annoying.
    Workplace harassment generally means someone is violating your right not to be discriminated against based on race, sex or other factors, by making inappropriate remarks in the workplace or conditioning an employment benefit on sexual favors, for example. You're obviously not talking about that.
    Since this question is filed under "neighbor law," I'm guessing perhaps your neighbor is doing this. Just because someone is asking you questions doesn't mean you have to answer them. Just smile and say, "hey, that's a personal question!" and change the subject.
    Some people have no boundaries, and they will pry into your business. Practice a few friendly comebacks that make it clear you're not going there, comment on the weather, and move on.
    In general a few nosy questions is not going to be considered legal harassment. Just part of life that we are expected to handle on our own, without getting the courts involved.
    Good luck!

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  • Can another person, besides the employee, legally clock you out for lunch and then back in after lunch if I ask them to?

    I work for a large company in California. Locally, everyone clocks in and out using a time clock except our department since we travel from one location to another frequently and may be on the road where it is impossible to clock in and out for lu...

    Lisa’s Answer

    Hello, San Luis Obispo! (Great town, by the way.)
    You say "it's been suggested . . . " so I'm wondering, by whom? By your boss, or another employee?
    The idea of a time clock is to accurately register when employees are working and when they're not. I don't like the idea of someone clocking in and out for you, because it undermines that purpose.
    I would suggest you sit down with your boss and explain this problem. Get specific approval for another person clocking you in and out. If you get that approval, email your boss a friendly confirmation, so that later you have it in writing that this was acceptable. Then I would prefer that you email the administrative assistant, rather than call, so that you have a record of your clocking in and out requests. If you have a smart phone, this can be even quicker than a phone call, and keep all those emails in a separate file in case you need to refer to them later.
    Good luck!

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  • I am a pro per Litigant in a Civil Case. What do I do if the Defense has not served me, I've requested filings and they ignore

    my requests. I have been served nothing but they are claiming they served me. I know that there is time frames for me to respond. I fear the case is going to be dismissed because they are not being honest.

    Lisa’s Answer

    Hello, Los Angeles!
    It's tough to proceed pro per (without a lawyer), but if you're committed to it, read all the rules carefully and keep careful records. Send a letter certified mail, return receipt requested, to your opponent, and state in the letter that you believe they are filing documents in the case without sending copies to you. State clearly where copies to you should be sent. Notify them of what you do have and request that they send anything else to you immediately. Keep a copy of your letter and the return receipt in the event they try to claim later that you are in default.
    Also, go down to the court and get copies of everything in court case file so you can be sure you're covered.
    Good luck!

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