Kavon Adli’s Answers

Kavon Adli

Beverly Hills Internet Lawyer.

Contributor Level 9
  1. Is it illegal to make fake "referrals" to websites in order for one's personal gain?

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Kavon Adli
    2. William Leroy Montague Jr.
    3. Hillary Johns
    3 lawyer answers

    Anytime someone uses deceptive practices over the internet in order to obtain benefits to which he or she would not otherwise be entitled, a red flag should go up, which it clearly that it has (at least in your mind), otherwise you would not have posted the question. The first place to start is the terms of use of the website. Chances are it prohibits the practice your friend is engaging in. If by fake you mean the email addresses are non-functional, that right there could be used as a basis...

    9 lawyers agreed with this answer

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  2. False advertising, unfair competition, or fraud?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Kavon Adli
    2. Christine C McCall
    3. Jonathan Aaron Weinman
    4. Bruce E. Burdick
    4 lawyer answers

    Without providing specific legal advice through this public forum, suffice it to say that the use of endorsements in a deceptive manner is unlawful. See, e.g., see http://ftc.gov/os/2009/10/091005revisedendorsementguides.pdf. If you feel that you have been harmed by the deceptive use of testimonials, you may retain an attorney to advise you of your rights and to potentially represent you. Alternatively, you can file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission or your state attorney general'...

    9 lawyers agreed with this answer

  3. How can I sue someone for maliciously posting my name and address on the internet? What type of attorney handles this?

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Kavon Adli
    2. Pamela Koslyn
    3. Judy A. Goldstein
    4. Michael Charles Doland
    4 lawyer answers

    You can sue someone for anything, however if you are asking whether you would have a viable claim, the answer would depend upon whether you would have a legally protected privacy interest in your address taking into account such issues as any prior publications of the address, whether the address was already independently in the public domain and the nature of the address (i.e., home versus business, etc.). A court might also consider whether there are factors which would cause the public...

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  4. Domain stolen by Registrar and sold with out going into redemption.

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Kavon Adli
    2. Sidney Christopher Winter
    3. Michael Raymond Daymude
    4. Sagar P. Parikh
    4 lawyer answers

    The issue of whether the registrar sold the domain improperly is something you want to retain an attorney in domain name-related legal experience to review, assuming it is sufficient value to you to justify the expense. If a bona fide purchaser now owns the domain, it may not be possible to get the domain back. However, you may conceivably have a claim against the registrar for damages.

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  5. How do I stop a Facebook page whose purpose to disparage myself, among others?

    Answered 10 months ago.

    1. Kavon Adli
    2. John A. Di Giacomo
    3. Frank A. Natoli
    3 lawyer answers

    The creation of a page or profile under a false name is a violation of Facebook's terms of use. Addressing that violation with Facebook may be the fastest and least costly method of removing the page. Retaining an attorney contact Facebook through the appropriate channels would be more likely to get its attention.

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

  6. Lead generation website

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. Kavon Adli
    2. Frank A. Natoli
    3. Andrew Endicott Schrafel
    4. Andrew Mark Jaffe
    5. Bruce E. Burdick
    5 lawyer answers

    No. A privacy policy merely grazes the surface of the legal work that is required for a legally compliant lead gen website.

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

  7. Restaurant blog looking for internet lawyer

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. Kavon Adli
    2. Andrew Endicott Schrafel
    3. Andrew Mark Jaffe
    4. Frank A. Natoli
    5. Maurice N Ross
    5 lawyer answers

    You would not only want a privacy policy, but also terms of use and disclaimers drafted by an Internet or other qualified attorney experienced in this area of law. I would avoid being supplied a privacy policy by a third party unless that third party is assuming responsibility for legal concerns arising out all related privacy practices and has the resources to defend a class action lawsuit or government prosecution. A privacy policy should be tailored to your actual privacy practices.

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

  8. What do I have to do to protect myself about a idea about a website I dont want my idea stole and done without me

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Kavon Adli
    2. Lubna Khan Jahangiri
    3. Thomas Anthony Schaeffer
    3 lawyer answers

    A properly drafted non-disclosure agreement (or "NDA") should provide significant protection.

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

  9. Do I have a lawsuit if there is a person I know who created a fake facebook profile of me and posted nude pictures

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Kavon Adli
    2. Michael Charles Doland
    2 lawyer answers

    Based upon the facts as indicated, you would have viable claims against this individual for invasion of privacy (publicity given to private life, portrayal in false light, intrusion upon seclusion and the right of publicity), intentional infliction of emotional distress, fraudulent misrepresentation. You may also pursue remedies that Facebook may provide to intellectual property rights owners as set forth in its terms of use, copyright or IP policy, or FAQ. Finally, Cal. Penal Code § 528.5...

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

  10. Help! Can I sue someone for doing this to me on facebook?

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Kavon Adli
    2. Scott Richard Kaufman
    3. Balam Osberto Letona
    3 lawyer answers

    Based upon the facts as indicated, you may have claims against this individual for invasion of privacy (publicity given to private life, portrayal in false light, intrusion upon seclusion and the right of publicity), intentional infliction of emotional distress and fraudulent misrepresentation. You may also pursue remedies that Facebook may provide to intellectual property rights owners as set forth in its terms of use, copyright or IP policy, or FAQ. Finally, Cal. Penal Code § 528.5 states...

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