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Jessica Farrah Anvar
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Jessica Anvar’s Answers

10 total

  • Verizon Wireless employee opened an account in my name without my permission. Can I sue Verizon in small claims court?

    I went to the corporate store to open a new account.They ran a credit check.I decided not to go with them and went home.A week later,I received a letter from Verizon saying I opened a new account and got a tablet.I called the customer service righ...

    Jessica’s Answer

    You should contact a consumer fraud attorney and discuss your options. Keep detailed records of the 'proof' that you have and make sure to keep notes regarding your communications with Verizon.

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  • Should I call this agency back or are they trying to scare me into jail time?

    I received a call from a woman stating she was from a company named National Mediation and she was from the Fraud dept. She said they would only call three times. I received a voice mail stating the following: She was calling regarding an IBC and ...

    Jessica’s Answer

    This sounds like typical harassment by a debt collector. The FDCPA protects consumers from abusive, deceptive and harassing debt collection practices and ensures fair debt collection practices. The Act provides a set of guidelines regarding what is and what is not legal debt collection practices. Do not erase the voicemail and keep a call log of all calls received from this collector. You should contact an FDCPA attorney in your state.

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  • SMALL HOTEL OWNER AND A GUEST LEFT WITHOUT PAYING

    She has agreed in several emails she will pay she even fraudulent send a picture of a suppose mobile transfer but at the end she does not pay, with all the evidence and emails that I have for the past 9 month can I sue her in any way?

    Jessica’s Answer

    You can definitely sue her. Sounds like you have the evidence to prove your case. The issue will be collecting on the judgment. You need to decide whether this is worth your time.

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  • Sold me a car with no pink slip!

    Guy I work with sold me a car he never gave me the pink slip I keep asking for my money back he wont give it to me or anything I dont know what to do ive been asking him for months I need help

    Jessica’s Answer

    It seems that this individual is not willing to amicably resolve this with you. You cannot force him to respond to your requests. However, you can file a lawsuit against him. You should file a small claims action against him.

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  • Bought a car online broke down can i ask for money back to fix it

    purchased a car on 3/06 on 03/23 car broke down previous owner never signed a warranty disclosure or sell as is paper with me i have talked to him stating the motor was damaged needs replacement i asked for half of the money back can i take him to...

    Jessica’s Answer

    If you purchased the car from a private seller, chances are that the seller did not provide you with a warranty and the car was sold to you "As-Is." This means that you purchased the car in its existing condition with its known and unknown problems. It is possible to have a claim against the seller if he/she made a material misrepresentation to you about the car. What representations were made to you about the car? You might want to consider reviewing the car's history by running a vehicle history report and comparing this to the representation made by the seller. In the meantime, you should attempt to reach the seller and see if he/she will unwind the deal.

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  • Can i sue the dealership because the sold me a bad used car?

    First off i would like to say i bought 2011 Dodge Avenger in 2/13 from a chevy dealer they sold me warranty with the car , i noticed a loud bang in transmission also when i turn on the ac or heater the rpm in the car goes below 500rpm so it feels...

    Jessica’s Answer

    It is possible. First, however, you need to determine if the manufacturer may be liable for the problems with your car. Was the manufacturer warranty active when you experienced problems with your car? Dodge cars are manufactured by Chrysler and Chrysler cars are supplied with a 3 year/36,000 mile manufacturer basic warranty and 5 year/100,000 mile powertrain warranty. How many miles were on the car when you purchased it? If it had more than 36,000 miles, than the basic manufacturer warranty had expired. If it had less than 100,000 miles then your powertrain warranty was still active and it may be possible to make a lemon law claim based on repeated problems to the powertrain system.

    Second, what were the terms of the written warranty that was provided by the dealership? If you experienced repeated problems with the car during the dealer warranty, then you may have a lemon law claim against the dealer. It sounds like you purchased an extended service contract and the problems, occurred after the expiration of the dealer warranty since you said you paid a "deductible." If this is true, then it will be difficult to present a claim against the dealership since the problems may have occurred after the expiration of the dealer warranty.

    As you can see, more information is necessary before a lemon law attorney can fully evaluate your claim. If you purchased the car in Nevada, I suggest contacting a Nevada lemon law attorney who should provide you with a free consultation on the phone. Best of luck to you.

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  • Can I legally get my money back?

    I bought a used car yesterday and I test drove it a few days before it drive fine no shake no sputter..so I told the girl I'd buy it! Bought it then that night I drove it out of town maybe got 8 miles and and stalled I shut it off and drive maybe...

    Jessica’s Answer

    I agree with the previous response. Unfortunately, there is little you can do legally when you purchase a car from a private seller. Private sellers typically do not provide any type of warranties when they sell a car. As a result, the buyer purchases the car "As-Is" and the buyer is accepting the car with all of its known and unknown problems. What kind of representations did this seller make to you about the car? Did he/she tell you it has a clean history? You might want to consider looking up the vehicle history report by using a service such as CarFax or Auto Check to see if the seller made a material misrepresentation to you about the car's history. You should definitely keep trying to reach out to the seller and see if he/she will unwind the transaction.

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  • Should I pick up my car from the dealership service center if I'm starting the process of returning car per lemon law?

    I purchased a brand new 2013 car in February and within a year it had transmission problems which caused transmission to be replaced twice with a total of 4 service visits for the same problem. This last time, the car has been in the shop for over...

    Jessica’s Answer

    Yes. You should pick up the car. Until you reach a settlement with Nissan, the car remains your responsibility and financial obligation. Thus, you cannot walk away from the car until you reach a resolution with Nissan. Arizona has a lemon law presumption, i.e., your car is presumed to be a lemon if there are 4 repair attempts or the car is out of service for 30 calendar days during the first 2 years or 24,000 miles, whichever comes first. If your car has less than 24,000 miles, it seems that you have met this presumption. If you are not satisfied with the arbitration outcome, you should speak with an AZ lemon law attorney who can assist you with your lemon law claim.

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  • Does California's Rosenthal fair debt collection act apply to collection law firms?

    I thought at one time it did not...

    Jessica’s Answer

    "Debt Collectors" must obey state and federal debt collection laws (FDCPA and RFDCPA). Both statutes mandate that debt collectors not use any illegal, deceptive or harassing debt collection tactics when attempting to collect the debt.

    One of the primary considerations in determining whether the FDCPA and RFDCPA apply, is the status of the person collecting the debt. The general rule is that the statutes apply only if the person collecting the debt is deemed a debt collector.

    When attorneys serve as "debt collectors" as defined under the statutes, they are exposed to liability per the FDCPA and RFDCPA. Attorneys hired by creditors may be held liable as "debt collectors" where they "regularly" engage in debt collection. See Nielsen v. Dickerson, 307 F.3d 623 (7th Cir. 2002). For example, a law firm that markets itself as having debt collection expertise and/or where a substantial amount of its revenue is generated from debt collection practices will most likely be deemed a debt collector.

    There are ample cases imposing liability on attorneys for violations of the statutes.

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  • Best decision to handle a consumer fraud outcome?

    I signed an retainer agreement to hired a attorney to handle my consumer fraud (auto) case, since then I haven't recieved an reply from my attorney but the car dealership was willing to cancel the contract and return my vehicle I traded in. I have...

    Jessica’s Answer

    Definitely attempt to reach your attorney. If you settle with the dealership without the involvement of your attorney, you may be in breach of your retainer agreement and then responsible to pay for your attorneys fees and costs. It sounds like the car dealership is trying to settle your claim without involving your attorney (possibly so that the dealership will not have to pay any legal fees). Since you hired a lawyer to represent you, you should make great effort to have your lawyer involved.

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