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John Bisnar

John Bisnar’s Legal Cases

5 total

  • Joshua Newman vs. Nissan

    Practice Area:
    Defective and Dangerous Products
    Outcome:
    confidential settlement
    Description:
    Joshua Newman, a college student, was driving his Nissan vehicle to go shopping at a local mall. Another driver made an unsafe left turn and hit Josh's car on the driver's side of his car, hitting both the passenger and driver doors. The driver's side of the car was buckled down and in by the impact. The driver's shoulder belt was attached to the frame of the door which was pushed in by the impact: this allowed Josh's upper body to swing free in the aftermath of the impact as if he was not wearing the shoulder belt. Josh's forehead and mid-skull hit the steering wheel, causing him broken facial bones and closed head brain injury, resulting in severe impairment in Josh's short term memory and many processing skills, severely compromising his ability to be successful in school or most employment opportunities.
  • Chan vs. City of Hanford, et al.

    Practice Area:
    Wrongful Death
    Outcome:
    $5,000,000 payment by City and driver, is expected
    Description:
    A new school was built on the outskirts of the City of Hanford, in Kings County, and new housing areas built around the school, while retaining much of the old rural street pattern and speed limits. However, the City did not provide safe predictable travel paths for children withing walking and bike riding distance of the school. Over several years, the City Planning Committee and City Council heard testimony and the results of investigation which showed that children were placed in danger by the speeds of some of the traffic on some of the streets between housing neighborhoods and the school without traffic control, stop signs or lights, marked cross walks, and/or crossing guards. The City Council acknowledged the existence of the danger, and the steps that could be followed to minimize the risk, but did not authorize the spending of the funds required to implement these protections for the school children. One afternoon, Christopher Chan was riding his bicycle home from school. He came to the intersection of one street with busy, high speed, uncontrolled traffic. He waited until a car next to him made a left hand turn onto the street and believing that this meant that he was clear to ride across, he started crossing the street on his bicycle. However, a car was approaching and the driver did not see Christopher crossing the street (a passenger did) and hit Christopher. Christopher's head broke the windshield of the car, then hit the ground after he flew through the air as a result of the impact. Christopher has suffered severe brain injuries, including frequent seizures, and now has a greatly reduced mental capacity. He will require a lifetime of medical care and attendant care.
  • Collins vs. Ford

    Practice Area:
    Wrongful Death
    Outcome:
    confidential settlement
    Description:
    Stephanie, her Mom, and her daughter (Crystal) got in the car to go shopping: Stephanie was in the front passenger seat of the Ford Escort, and Crystal was in a car seat in the back, behind Stephanie. While they were driving, they had to slow and pull to the right of the roadway because of approaching fire trucks. The car following the Escort did not slow, and rear ended the Escort at about 25 miles per hour. The impact caused moderate damage to the back of the car. However, the impact also broke the supports for the back of the seat that Stephanie was sitting in. Her momentum threw Stephanie's head and shoulders backward, into Crystal, striking Crystal with such force that Crystal's aorta was torn and she bled to death. Ford engineers knew about this frailty of their seats, and did little to nothing to strenghen the seat back supports to prevent this failure.
  • Austin vs. Lacy Sign Company

    Practice Area:
    Wrongful Death
    Outcome:
    $1 million
    Description:
    Beverly Brooks-Austin was driving on the 91 freeway when a large wooden sign lifted up out of the bed of a pick-up truck, flew through the air, and hit Beverly's car. One of the support legs entered the car through the windshield and hit Beverly in the head. After a month in a coma in several different hospitals, Beverly died. Policy limit settlement within two weeks of Beverly's death.
  • Rittenberg vs. General Motors

    Practice Area:
    Defective and Dangerous Products
    Outcome:
    confidential settlement
    Description:
    Dr. Charles Rittenberg and Dr. Betthe Rittenberg, both second career physicians, were driving back home from a college football weekend in South Carolina when Betthe saw a dog in the highway ahead of her. She moved to avoid the dog; because of the lack of stability of the Suburban she was driving, the car spun out of control, tripped and rolled on and then over the highway. The roof of the Suburban crushed so completely that Betthe's head extended through the driver's side window and was crushed by the roadway. Charles was seriously injured in the accident. Brian Chase was able to convince General Motors that he could demonstrate the inherent weakness of the roof design of the Suburban, and that a very large recovery was probable if the case went to trial.