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Sarah Faith Hardy-Cooper

Sarah Hardy-Cooper’s Answers

7 total

  • Is it really possible to get a divorce in 5 weeks?

    I've been married for 7 years now, but have been seperated only 3 months after we got married. Is there any low or no cost attorney in my area? Been wanting my divorce, but never the money to do so.

    Sarah’s Answer

    In Nevada, divorce can be really simple and fast or really slow and complicated. The biggest factor in determining how long it will take is whether the spouses agree as to the terms of the divorce. If you two agree as to every aspect of the divorce, you can easily get divorced within a month in the Reno area and Las Vegas is probably about the same. Check out the local court's website or go down there to the self-help center. There are forms for simple divorces where the parties agree to the terms. If you have significant assets or debts or complicated issues regarding children though, you should consult an attorney. Look here or go to the state bar's website (nvbar.org) for low income referrals.

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  • I have been unemployed for 6 months, and my ex is asking an order from the courts to show proof of employment search?

    I have been unemployed for 6 months now. I just moved to California 3 months ago, where my kids reside with their mother. My ex is asking for an order from the courts for me to show proof of job seeking. What should I expect? Can I join a employme...

    Sarah’s Answer

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    It never hurts to keep a log of your employment search. While it's strange that she is asking for this when you are not asking to reduce your child support, you might as well start keeping one in case you do need to request a decrease in your child support. Employment search reports are not difficult, just keep track of when and where you looked for employment (like if you used a search engine, professional journal, talked to recruiters, went to an employment agency), whether you submitted an application/resume, who you talked to, and what became of the attempt.

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  • The mother of my brothers daughter is keeping her away from us

    The mother of my brothers daughter is keeping her away from us, they have joint legal and she has sole physical custody. we don't know what to do. she is receiving child support from the state of Minnesota and moved to the state of Iowa. we cant a...

    Sarah’s Answer

    You should look on the website for the court in the city/county where the mother lives. More and more, courts are putting forms on the site to help people navigate family court issues. What you are requesting is called third-party visitation and this is the way that extended family and sometimes, ex-stepparents attempt to maintain contact with children that are not their own. The statutes vary state to state, but the courts are always looking at what arrangement is in the child's best interest. Some things the courts consider are whether you have had a good relationship with the child in the past, have you provided financial help to her, are you supportive of her relationship with her mother, etc.

    Before starting a court battle, however, sometimes more informal things can get you back in the mother's good graces. Perhaps you could start by sending mother a nice letter to initiate communications and see whether she would allow you to have communication with the child via letters or cards. Don't be tempted to chastise the mother for not allowing visits because that certainly is not going to encourage her to allow more contact. As time goes on and trust is built, perhaps the mother will allow short visits become longer ones.

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  • I was court ordered to turn over my children's belongings that of some I do not have. How do I prove this?

    My ex took my children from me and was awarded temporary primary custody because my son is a teenager and was of age to tell the judge he wanted to live with his father. He hasn't paid for anything in the last 3 years and now wants me to hand ove...

    Sarah’s Answer

    If you have been ordered by the court to do something, you should do it. You can't turn over property that you don't have in your possession, but you also shouldn't hide it or give it away because you are upset with the judge's ruling. Judges have many powers to enforce their orders including contempt power and sometimes will have an officer escort someone to retrieve items referenced in the court order. You certainly wouldn't want to end up spending time in jail or paying a fine because you refused to follow a court order.

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  • What can i do to make the record reflect correctly

    my husband has filed divorce in north Carolina and i live in Tenn where of marriage took place. we are separated do to his physical and mental abuse that with his need to impregnate other women. but the form his attorney sent me he no mention of t...

    Sarah’s Answer

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    You need an attorney. Usually the state where the divorce is filed must have personal jurisdiction over the opposing party (or consent from the opposing party) in order for the case to be completed there. Some states allow people to get a "status only" divorce when that state doesn't have jurisdiction over the other person. Jurisdiction is more complicated if there are children involved. If North Carolina doesn't have personal jurisdiction over you, you will likely need an attorney to challenge that jurisdiction for you. Whatever you do, don't ignore those divorce papers, they can have severe consequences on your life.

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  • How much weight does a judge put on a teenager's desire to live with the other parent?

    I have been divorced since 2001 and share joint legal custody with my ex. My teenage son has expressed on occasion (usually when he is angry with me) a desire to live with his father. He sees his father every weekend (including Fridays after schoo...

    Sarah’s Answer

    The answer to your question varies from state to state, but the overarching standard is going to be looking at what custodial arrangement is in the child's best interest. In Nevada, the court considers a child's preference under the best interest standard when "the child is of sufficient age and capacity to form an intelligent preference as to his or her custody." The NV statute purposefully does not state an age where the child can give his or her opinion so the judges can weigh each case individually. I have seen judges talk to kids ages 11 and up, but they typically don't rubber stamp the child's preference, especially if it seems like the child is attempting to manipulate the situation so he/she can live with the other parent to get into trouble. In a situation where both parents are competent and loving, NV judges seem to give the most weight to children who are doing well in school and life and give a positive reason for wanting to change homes as opposed to a negative one.

    If your son is having trouble and you and the father agree that he may benefit from therapy, send him to therapy. Hopefully he will be able to work through the teenage angst and you and the father can continue to cooperate with each other for your son's benefit.

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  • What can be an good out of state parenting plan for a father to see his 1 year old daughter he has no money and i am not one to

    have a lot of money too.

    Sarah’s Answer

    Long-distance parenting is always a challenge, especially if the child is young and finances are tight. One option I suggest to my clients is to pursue online visits through Skype or other conferencing sites. These services are usually free; you just need a computer and webcam. With a one-year old, the visits will likely be short and may only consist of the father and child having an opportunity to see each other regularly. If everyone's schedule can handle it, short visits could be had a couple of times a week. When the child gets older, the visits can include other things like the father reading stories at bed time. Exchanging letters and pictures also helps. In many states, the non-custodial parent can receive a deduction on child support to offset the costs of transportation for visits if the custodial parent moved away. Needless to say good communication between the parents and being supportive of the out of state parent's relationship is vital. Good luck!

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