Jennifer K. Craft’s Answers

Jennifer K. Craft

Las Vegas Intellectual Property Law Attorney.

Contributor Level 8
  1. Would using the name or a picture of a a Trademarked food product in a cookbook qualify as any type of infringement?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Jennifer K. Craft
    2. Pamela Koslyn
    3. Daniel Nathan Ballard
    3 lawyer answers

    I agree with all of the above answers. It depends on how you use the product name and photo. If you're simply listing a product name as an ingredient, it's much less likely to be an issue. If you call your dish or your cookbook by that trademarked product name, then that can be a problem. Also, notices of third party ownership of the trademarks would be helpful. As for the photo itself, you or your IP attorney should "clear" your rights to use the photo first. Resolve any issues involving...

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  2. Should I register my domain name even though it is a common word/phrase?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Jennifer K. Craft
    2. Jeffrey Michael Donato
    3. Lee Kim
    3 lawyer answers

    Following up with what Lee Kim wrote, if your domain name and product name are generic (for example, the word APPLE is generic for the sale of apples), there may be very little you can do by way of protecting the word. If your domain name and product name are descriptive of a feature of your products and services (for example, DIET-TUTOR.COM would likely be considered descriptive for books because it describes the contents of your books), you may still be able to federally register the name....

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  3. I am an artist starting a business with partners. My part is art and theirs is funding. Should I license or sign over © of art?

    Answered over 4 years ago.

    1. Daniel Nathan Ballard
    2. Jennifer K. Craft
    3. Joe B Stansell
    3 lawyer answers

    Whether you assign or license your copyrights to the company is more a business decision than a legal one. If you can get the other shareholders to agree, keeping the copyrights and licensing the rights to use the artwork to the company would be ideal because once the relationship ends (depending on what the license agreement and corp docs say) you would still retain ownership. To their concern about "security" in holding the copyright, this can be addressed in the license agreement with...

    1 person marked this answer as helpful