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Tyson B. Snow

Tyson Snow’s Answers

132 total


  • Do i need a lawyer to file charge w/ eeoc?NOT just age discrimination! disability?harassment?hostile work envor?retaliation?

    Age discrimination "youre old & health is failing-You're old &U smell bad Told me"You have Major Depression Told Every employee this & there's something WRONG w/ her find out what & tell me Called my spouse She has Depression &i'm not running re...

    Tyson’s Answer

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    No, you do not need a lawyer to file charges with the EEOC. A lot of people file charges with the EEOC, cooperate with the EEOC during the investigation, and possibly retain a lawyer if needed. If the EEOC issues you a right to sue letter, you should definitely hire an attorney at that point.

    I hope this information helps! Best of luck.

    -Tyson-
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/tysonsnow
    http://www.tysonsnow.co

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  • How can I proceed with a messy licensing contract negotiation so that I am compensated fairly?

    Began work on a logo for a foreign clothing designer in Jan 2012. Gave the client an estimate stating how many hours I'd spend / how much I was charging for that amount of work, to be paid 1/2 initially and 1/2 on completion. Neither party signed ...

    Tyson’s Answer

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    I think there is an additional point worth making here. It sounds to me like the original emails back and forth may be sufficient to establish a written and signed agreement between the parties. If that is the case, the terms in those emails should govern. And it sounds like the other party may have breached those terms--repeatedly. If that is the case, you may have a claim for breach of contract, which may be a bigger issue than the proposed relinquishment contract.

    Ultimately, you will likely have to relinquish rights in order to recover what you are owed. But I question why they want you to enter into a contract that deals with payment. It would be interesting to compare this new contract with the terms agreed to in the original emails.

    In my opinion, you need to contract an attorney to have both the emails and the proposed contract reviewed. I think this would be extremely helpful in deciding what is the next step to take. (And if you are ever in Macon, say high to my family for me!)

    -Tyson-
    http://www.tysonsnow.co
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/tyson

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  • Can i post mugshots online?

    My county posts mugshots of inmates online, is it illegal if i copy them and paste them on a Facebook page?

    Tyson’s Answer

    No, it is not illegal. Booking records, including mugshots, are considered and legally recognized as public records, in the public domain. Because they are in the public domain, you are free to post them. I hope this information helps!

    -Tyson-
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/tysonsnow
    http://www.avvo.com/attorneys/84101-ut-tyson-snow-1902079.html

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  • How much does it cost to invent something?

    legal fees, invention protection fees, just all and any fee that i might need to pay.

    Tyson’s Answer

    As Mark said, the costs and fees only come into play when you start seeking protection of your invention. An intellectual property attorney will be able to help you estimate the total cost (patent filing fees, attorneys fees, etc.) for filing for patent protection. Beyond patents, you may want to consider additional ways of protecting your invention and/or your marketing efforts. I would suggest looking into trademarks and copyrights as these will help you prevent confusion between your products and those of potential competitors. Protecting trademarks, trade dress, trade secrets, and copyrights will also prevent competitors from trading off of your name.

    I suggest you contact an IP lawyer sooner rather than later. There are certain rules about disclosing and publishing your invention prior to filing your application. There are also considerations such as filing a provisional application, researching potential infringement of other patents, and organizing your IP for investors to review. All of these things will contribute to the cost but they are necessary if you have a marketable invention that you don't want others to copy.

    I hope this additional information is helpful. Best of luck with your new invention!

    -Tyson-
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/tysonsnow
    http://www.tysonsnow.co

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  • Can I sue my prospective employer for not hiring me?

    After completing my 2nd interview and job shadow (of which I scored 100%) hiring supervisor stated to the person I shadowed that she wasn't going to hire me because she (supervisor) felt I was "too ghetto", despite the person I shadowed saying "I ...

    Tyson’s Answer

    Because there are a lot of situation specific facts involved, I would suggest speaking with a local employment lawyer. Here is a quick summary that might give you some insight:

    You can file a complaint against a prospective employer if the reason they refused to hire you is based on a protected characteristic (such as race, religion, national origin, disabilities, gender, age, etc.). If you believe that the employer refused to hire you because of one of these characteristics, you may have a discrimination claim. Interestingly, the employer brought you back for two interviews and a job shadow. The employer will likely say that, if it wanted to discriminate against you, it would have turned you down after the initial interview. This is something that a lawyer will be able to help you analyze once the lawyer knows all of the pertinent facts.

    With respect to the employee you shadowed, she is also protected under Title VII (or a related anti-discrimination act). She would be able to file a complaint against the employer if the employer retaliates against her as a result of her statements and/or actions related to potential discrimination against you. It may be helpful to have her check with Human Resources; H.R. might help her feel more comfortable in participating in the investigation regarding discrimination.

    I hope this is helpful. Best of luck.

    -Tyson-
    http://www.tysonsnow.co
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/tysonsnow

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  • Do verbal warnings need to be documented by the employer? Employer is stating that I received multiple verbal warnings in 3 mths

    I was never given any verbal warnings nor was I told that my job was in jeopordy. That is what they are saying know. My work schedule was 1/30 to 8pm and some days 10 or 11 to 8pm know they are saying that I had a pattern of tardiness and was give...

    Tyson’s Answer

    I am not entirely clear on what you are asking. I generally represent employers and if you are getting verbal warnings it is probably (I hope) because your employer does not understand your situation.

    My suggestion is to provide your employer with the notes from your doctor and request that no written warnings be added to your employee file. If you have a legitimate reason for being tardy, such as a doctor's note, you may be able to avoid be written up. That said, if you fail to inform your employer of the reason you are tardy, the employer has no reason not to give you verbal warnings about your performance.

    Hopefully, once the entire situation is laid out on the table and your employer understands what is happening, you will be able to reach some sort of resolution whereby the employer accepts the challenges you face as a result of the medication you are taking and you do not receive any negative reviews or write-ups as a result.

    I hope this information proves helpful. Like I said, I am not exactly sure what you are seeking or hoping for with this question but I do hope that things work out for you.

    -Tyson-
    http://www.tysonsnow.co
    http://www.padrm.com

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  • I was retaliated at work. I want to sue. How do I do this?

    School district.

    Tyson’s Answer

    Ms. Rojas is completely correct. A lawyer will need much more information to determine whether you have a valid retaliation complaint. I would suggest contacting Ms. Rojas to discuss the matter and determine whether it is worth pursuing. Best of luck!

    -Tyson-
    http://www.tysonsnow.co

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  • Medical Leave Act

    is over and I'm still ill. can I use my vacation/sick days to avoid termination

    Tyson’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    Yes, if you still have vacation or sick days at the end of your FMLA leave, you can use them to extend the leave. If, however, your employer ran your vacation and sick days concurrently with your FMLA leave or if you "took" your vacation/sick days so that you would get paid will you were out (FMLA leave is unpaid), then you may not have any vacation or sick days left.

    I would check with your employer to determine how many sick and/or vacation days you have left and then inform your employer that you want to use those days at the end of your leave. You need to inform your employer of your intent to use vacation or sick leave.

    I hope this information helps. I hope you start feeling better soon.

    -Tyson-
    http://www.padrm.com
    http://www.twitter.com/tysonESQ

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  • Do I need permission from authors on book written about me and my work to use front/back cover copy in my commercial webinars?

    (1) Book was written about me but not by me. I received royalties but have no rights of creative input on book. (2) I only want to use color copy of the front cover (which has my name on it), back cover, and one 2 paragraph outtake. (3) I wish t...

    Tyson’s Answer

    Unfortunately, you will likely need to get permission, particularly if you are going to use the covers and some of the text for commercial purposes.

    Although the book is about you and your work, you do not hold the copyright in the book or the artwork and/or graphical work and impressions from the covers, Accordingly, you will likely need a license or permission from the current copyright holder.

    Some people may argue that you could use the covers under the "fair use doctrine". This is a factual inquiry and it is difficult to determine, in a vacuum, whether fair use would apply. Based on what you have described, however, it does not sound like fair use to me. I hope this helps. Best of luck!

    -Tyson-
    http://www.socialmediaesq.com
    http://www.twitter.com/tysonESQ

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  • Is it misconduct ?when employer tells you to" just go home forever" and after that statement was made a verbal exchange began

    Employer came into office stated that I had an attitude. Employer than called a meeting , I walked over to meeting area. Employer stated that I had made a noise, and that I have an attitude maybe I should go home for the day. I said maybe I should...

    Tyson’s Answer

    It is not "misconduct" in the legal sense. Florida is an at-will employment state meaning your employer can fire you for any reason or no reason at all. Here, it sounds like you got into an argument with your employer which led to your discharge. Your employer had the right to fire you (unless there extenuating circumstances).

    There may be other facts that we are not aware of that would help you establish a retaliatory firing (for example, your demand for PTO if your employer was truly withholding PTO for an illegal reason or in violation of state law). But on the facts described, the employer's actions may have been inappropriate or even "misconduct" but not to the level that your employer violated any laws.

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