R. Stephen Ferrell’s Answers

R. Stephen Ferrell

Houston Insurance Law Lawyer.

Contributor Level 10
  1. How do i find how much my settlement if attorney will not tell me?

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. Jason Eric Kipness
    2. R. Stephen Ferrell
    3. James W. Cole
    3 lawyer answers

    Your attorney has a legal obligation to inform you of the amount of any settlement and to disclose any expenses advanced on the case. You should fax him a letter asking for this information, and if he does not provide it, you should contact the State Bar of Texas.

    1 lawyer agreed with this answer

  2. Who is at fault?

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. R. Stephen Ferrell
    2. Mason Rashtian
    3. R. Sebastian Gibson
    4. Andrew Daniel Myers
    4 lawyer answers

    The technical answer is whichever vehicle first legally enters the intersection on a green light would have control of the intersection. If you legally enter the intersection first on a green light, then even if the light turns yellow, you are legally in the intersection, and approaching traffic should allow the vehicle that first legally entered the intersection to clear the intersection before entering if there is a potential conflict between their paths of travel.

    Selected as best answer

  3. What kind of lawyer do I need to sue my bank for a major mistake made by a bank employee, costing us a huge neagative balance?

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. R. Stephen Ferrell
    1 lawyer answer

    Any Texas Lawyer who handles civil disputes can write the bank a letter on your behalf and demand (on your behalf) that the $600 be immediately credited back to your account. Since it will take more than 45 days to prosecute a lawsuit against your bank, it might be worth it to wait the 45 days to see if the bank credits the money back to your account. My opinion is that once the bank receives a demand letter from an attorney, they will probably go ahead and credit the money back to your...

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  4. How long should it take an insurance company to resolve a claim for a stolen car.

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. R. Stephen Ferrell
    2. Benjamin M Pinczewski
    2 lawyer answers

    It depends on the facts and circumstances of the loss? Has the insurance company requested an examination under oath? Or have they asked for additional information about the car that was stolen? What did the last letter you received from the insurance company say? I would need to know the answers to these questions in order to fully answer your question. My office is in Houston, Texas. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions. My number is (713) 800-0220. Respectfully,...

  5. Forged Signature

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. R. Stephen Ferrell
    2. Stephen Neil Foster
    3. Pamela Koslyn
    3 lawyer answers

    You should IMMEDIATELY report the forged signatures to your bank. I hope, for your sake, that the forgeries happened in the past 60 days, because your depository agreement with your bank probably has a clause in it that lets them off the hook if you wait more than 60 days to report the forgery. I have handled forgery cases before and some banks have 90 day deadline to report forgeries, but most have gone to a 60 day notice period. (If you happen to save the little fine print pamphlet that...

  6. Can insurance still total car/offer a settlement equal to the value of car if repair shop is unable to fix vehicle as promised?

    Answered about 3 years ago.

    1. R. Stephen Ferrell
    2. Christian K. Lassen II
    2 lawyer answers

    Here's a link to an excellent article which explains what it means when an insurance company says that they are "totaling" a car. After reading this article, I would suggest that you first try to speak with the adjuster about the problem, then, if it can't be worked out, you should seek legal counsel. Here's the link to the article which I recommend that you read: http://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2011/04/20/truth-totaled-cars/

  7. My girlfriend received a traffic violation for not presenting her insurance card when she was driving my car..can we contest?

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. Jose Pablo Noriega
    2. Andrew Johnston Williams
    3. R. Stephen Ferrell
    3 lawyer answers

    Yes. Simply take your proof of insurance to traffic court and show it to the prosecutor and the traffic court judge. Most traffic court judges will dismiss the ticket for failure to show proof of insurance if you can prove that you did, in fact, have automobile liability insurance coverage at the time you were pulled over.

  8. Can I sue for stolen property in texas with having a police report and 2 eye witnesses.

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. R. Stephen Ferrell
    1 lawyer answer

    You certainly can sue the thief, but you will need to call the two witnesses in Court to prove the theft and you will have to testify to prove the contents of the purse. Since most people don't carry $2000 worth of valuables in their purse, the jury will also have to decide how much value they place on the contents of your purse, so you will have to convince them not only of the thief's culpability, but also of the value of the things you lost. One thing you might not have considered is that...

  9. How long do i have to get automobile insurance after moving to Texas

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. Cynthia Russell Henley
    2. Robert Smead Hogan
    3. R. Stephen Ferrell
    3 lawyer answers

    Getting automobile insurance is one of the first things you should do when you move to Texas. If you had insurance in your previous state of residence, that covers you when you drive across the Texas State line, but once you actually take up residence in the state of Texas, you are supposed to purchase and maintain Texas Automobile Liability Insurance. In addition to liability insurance, it's a good idea to get personal injury protection (PIP) insurance and uninsured under-insured motorist...

  10. Can I sue the thief who stole my are and was caught in it.

    Answered about 4 years ago.

    1. R. Stephen Ferrell
    2. Cynthia Russell Henley
    3. Theodore Lyons Araujo
    3 lawyer answers

    Yes, you certainly can sue the thief, but remember the old adage that "you can't squeeze blood out of a turnip". You can definitely sue the thief and get a judgment against him, but even if you do that, it is doubtful that the thief will have any money to pay the judgment. Since the thief probably has no money, many attorneys are going to request that you pay them by the hour to file the lawsuit and go after the thief. But if you pay an attorney to file suit against the thief, you will have...