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Kristie Leigh Bowerman

Kristie Bowerman’s Answers

7 total

  • "At this time USCIS cannot provide you with information for your case"

    I am getting this message "At this time USCIS cannot provide you with information for your case" for 4 days now when I enter my receipt number, what does that means

    Kristie’s Answer

    I agree with my colleagues. This will sometimes happen when there is a glitch in USCIS' system, or when they have not updated the online case status system. Most of the time this will be resolved within a few days of them receipting the petition, but sometimes it is not. You should call the USCIS National Customer Service Center (800-375-5283), let them know of the problem, and check to make sure that they have your contact information correct so that you don't miss anything.

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  • On form I-693 (medical), can a 16yo sign that or the parent should? The MD said it should be the parent since he is minor.

    I'm working on GC application and have my child sign the forms as dependent. Should he sign them or the parent?

    Kristie’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    A parent or guardian should not sign Form I-693 if the person being examined is 14 or older. As per the instructions to Form I-693 (page 2, General Instructions, 8. Applicant's Certification), "if the applicant is under 14 years of age, a parent or guardian may sign Form I-693. If the applicant is 14 years of age or older, her or she must sign Form I-693." I would recommend thoroughly reading the instructions to the form and, if necessary, taking them to the medical examination appointment with you.

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  • I have a couple of financial convictions, nonviolent, from years ago. Can I still sponsor my wife through I130, etc?

    The questions I have seen here relate to the noncitizen who might have convictions. This question is a little different. I have a couple of felony theft convictions from some years ago. The last time my partner visited me from The Bahama...

    Kristie’s Answer

    There are come convictions that will keep a U.S. citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident from filing any family-based immigration petition, such as "specified offenses against a minor" under the Adam Walsh Act. Some other violent crimes, including domestic violence, can also cause problems. Nonviolent, financial convictions do not generally pose a problem. However, in any case where a criminal record is involved, I recommend seeking experienced immigration counsel.

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  • Should an F-1 student have police local 'bans' lifted before leaving the US? (Was banned to a place but did NOT get arrested.)

    I'm an F-1 student & got 2 bans from my university campus police. The 1st one was to a local church because I pissed off the priest by calling him a name, & also he thought I was sleeping in the church, which I didn't, but the police believed him....

    Kristie’s Answer

    I agree with my colleagues. If the only police involved were campus police, then it would appear that the university handled this privately and it is unlikely to be an issue for you in regards to your immigration matters. If you are unsure if other police were involved, you could always request a police clearance letter or records check from your local police station and see if anything shows up.

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  • What does my mother-n-law need to do to come here from Mexico to visit?

    My mother-n-law wants to come visit us from Mexico. What does she need to do or have to come here? How long does it take once she starts the processes? How long can she stay?

    Kristie’s Answer

    She will need to obtain a B-2 visa from a U.S. consulate in Mexico. To do so, she will have to meet specific requirements and will need to show that she does not intend to remain in the U.S. permanently, among other things. Generally, a B-2 visa is issued as a multiple entry visa valid for up to 10 years. However, upon entering the U.S. she will be admitted for a stay of 180 days or less. The time it takes to get a B-2 visa varies by consulate. If you are unsure as to how to navigate this process, it is best to consult an experienced immigration attorney who can help you put together the proper forms and supporting evidence.

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  • Immigration: I-131 filing with I-130/I-485: is 30 days 'expected length of trip' reasonable?

    for ending apartment lease and selling remaining assets in birth country to move permanently to USA? Thank you!

    Kristie’s Answer

    Yes, 30 days is a reasonable amount of time. However, if you have any uncertainties at all regarding Advance Parole, I recommend that you consult an experienced immigration attorney to ensure eligibility, effect on any current nonimmigrant status you may have, etc. USCIS will not review these issues for you and advise you.

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  • What do the congressman and the senator do to help with my immigration case ?

    I have a pending case for 13 months now since we filed to adjust my status after marriage to a US citizen ,we did call a few times and went for infopass but were told to wait because AOS cases sometimes take years , all I hear from people is hang ...

    Kristie’s Answer

    It really depends on your Senator or Congressman and what is happening with your case. I have helped facilitate client communication with both Senators and Congressmen on various types of cases after the client has contacted one or the other; some of them are very helpful and have been able to get a case moving when things had fallen through the cracks and some of them are not very helpful at all. Whether you should choose a Senator or a Congressman also varies from state to state in my experience. Some will make a one-time inquiry on the status of your case and then just give you the canned answer that USCIS provides ("It's pending"). Some are agreeable to following up this type of boilerplate response with any additional questions you may have. Keep in mind that if your case is within normal processing times or is going through some additional processing, there may be very little a Senator or Congressman can do. An immigration lawyer in your area should have some experience as to whether or not a Senator or Congressman in your state is particularly helpful, and whether or not your case is appropriate for intervention.

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