Jeffrey Scott Hyslip’s Answers

Jeffrey Scott Hyslip

Chicago Litigation Lawyer.

Contributor Level 13
  1. How big of a case do I have? Filed bankruptcy, should not be on report from credit companies or collections.

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey Scott Hyslip
    2. Dorothy G Bunce
    3. Marc Gregory Wagman
    3 lawyer answers

    Make sure the attorney has experience with FCRA claims. They are sometimes complicated and unless disputes are made properly under the statute one could forfeit their claims. In my experience, FCRA claims, assuming you have one, take longer than three months to resolve. As a side note, I would encourage you to make sure you only sign a contingency fee agreement here. If they lawyer really believes in your case he should be willing to risk his time on it. Best of luck.

    9 lawyers agreed with this answer

    2 people marked this answer as helpful

  2. If I want to settle with credit company after receiving summon , do I still have to " answer " to the court ?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Frank Wei-Hong Chen
    2. Jeffrey Scott Hyslip
    3. Mikalah Liviakis
    4. Scott Richard Kaufman
    5. Linda Calderon Garrett
    6. ···
    9 lawyer answers

    I would highly consider you to consult with an attorney. At worst see if the clerk of court where you were sued can help. You don't want to not answer the complaint or you will automatically lose. If you settle before the court date get something in writing from the creditors attorney saying if you pay x they will dismiss the suit. Make sure you keep a receipt that you paid. I'd start negotiations at around 50% of what you owe. See if they will break the payments over months if you have to pay...

    9 lawyers agreed with this answer

    2 people marked this answer as helpful

  3. What are the chief differences between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Dorothy G Bunce
    2. David Lloyd Merrill
    3. Jeffrey Scott Hyslip
    4. William Joseph Kopp Jr.
    5. Allan J. Rittenhouse
    6. ···
    6 lawyer answers

    The Chief Difference (although I am sure you will get more detailed answers) is that in a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy - all of your unsecured debts are wiped out in the snap of a finger and in a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy you pay a % (based on your income) of your debt back to your Creditors over a number of years. Chapter 13 has some benefits that Chapter 7 doesn't so depending on your situation and what you are trying to get accomplished one Chapter will be better for you. Also, in a Chapter 7...

    9 lawyers agreed with this answer

  4. Acct from original creditor to collector then to a lawyer then the "say" they received Ceise & Desist so went back to collector?

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey Scott Hyslip
    2. Amy Lavonne Wells
    3. Gregory Howard Wiley
    3 lawyer answers

    Greetings, As she said, it might be your lucky day. However, what also could have happened is that the debt was sold to a debt purchaser and you will get contacted in the future. Until you receive something in writing from a new company, I would (personally not legally) advise you to leave sleeping dogs alone. Best case scenario, they wrote it off as bad debt and didn't sell it. If that is the case, then most likely the statute of limitations on collecting the debt will run. Be...

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

    4 people marked this answer as helpful

  5. What to do when you receive a card in the door from a senior special agent from bureau of criminal investigations Medicaid fraud

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Jeffrey Scott Hyslip
    2. Jacques H. Geisenberger Jr.
    3. Kris K. Skaar
    4. Robert C. Keller
    4 lawyer answers

    I would certainly find an attorney. Good luck.

    Selected as best answer

  6. My husband has been filtering my money from my business for years without my knowledge.

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Jeffrey Scott Hyslip
    2. Walter C Oney Jr
    3. Kevin Christopher Gleason
    4. Daniel DeMaria
    4 lawyer answers

    Wow. I a really sorry to hear about this. This is not the easy question that is usually asked here. I would immediately get in touch with a local attorney who can start protecting your property. There are many theories an attorney might use to hold him responsible for fraud based in the facts. You will likely want to pursue him for counts if fraud so his debt can't be discharged in bankruptcy. I'm terribly sorry for you. Hang in there!

    7 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  7. I want to legally and ethically shield my assets from Creditors. What is the best way to do so?

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. David Matthew Gotzh
    2. Marc Gregory Wagman
    3. Jeffrey Scott Hyslip
    4. Barry Franklin Poulson
    4 lawyer answers

    There is nothing unethical about protecting your assets to the fullest extent of the law. The laws were passed to provide you with protection. As the first attorney stated, find an attorney that focuses on Bankruptcy or debt collection. They could help you "plan" properly. Huge corporations and the rich do this all of the time. You just want to make sure you protect yourself in time to prevent any appearance of fraud.

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

    3 people marked this answer as helpful

  8. Re: Allocation of legal fee liability in lawsuit having Fair Debt Collection Act claims among others

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey Scott Hyslip
    2. Scott M. Behren
    3. Christopher Douglas Smith
    3 lawyer answers

    Its hard for me to think of a situation off hand where the Plaintiff would be responsible for the opposing counsel's legal fees unless they were entitled to it under statute, the causes of action were brought in bad faith, or there was a contract providing for the prevailing parties attorneys fees to be paid for by the losing party. Find an FDCPA attorney and give them more specifics to the causes of action that you want to include. They can then give you a better idea if its wise to...

    Selected as best answer

  9. Can a debt collector legally garnish/clean out my savings account without my knowledge

    Answered almost 2 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey Scott Hyslip
    2. Dorothy G Bunce
    3. Robert Harlan Stempler
    4. Susan Kathryn Ashabraner
    5. Daniel Lee O'Neil
    6. ···
    7 lawyer answers

    Property cannot be taken without due process. For example, you have to be provided with sufficient legal notice before a creditor can seize any of your assets. It sounds to me that you were not properly provided notice. I would encourage you to meet with an attorney nearby to get some advice on how/if you could vacate the judgment and execution. Good Luck!

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

    2 people marked this answer as helpful

  10. I have a payroll deduction garnishment from a debt collector.

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Jeffrey Scott Hyslip
    2. Michael Lawrence Fine
    3. David Kennedy Bifulco
    3 lawyer answers

    Technically, yes - for several reasons. However, practically speaking, if you don't have a valid defense to the lawsuit, all you'd be doing is spending money to get the garnishment vacated and the judgment reopened only to have the judgment likely taken again and the garnishment then placed back. Without knowing more facts, lets assume that the debt collection attorney's behavior was accidental. Assuming that was the case, and that you don't have a valid dispute to the debt (or the...

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

    2 people marked this answer as helpful

HARASSED BY COLLECTORS? We make THEM pay YOU! Debt Collectors Hate Us!

312-380-6110