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Vincent Broach Browne

Vincent Browne’s Answers

6 total

  • I was struck by a car while riding a bicycle. the driver attempted to run but a witness got his plate number. i recieved 20

    stiches and have chronic knee pain. how do i settle without a lawyer

    Vincent’s Answer

    You may have an uninsured motorist claim if the insurance company for the driver denies coverage. For example, if the driver was using the vehicle without the permission of its owner, coverage may not exist. You would then need to look to your own policy of motor vehicle insurance or any insurance maintained by a member of your household. It can't hurt to contact a lawyer to discuss your options.

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  • Can I be held liable if my 21 year old son gets into a car accident?

    My son is 21 years old - he has his own car, titled in his name only, with a loan that is in his name only. He has his own insurance, which he pays for on his own. He lives with me, I do not collect any rent or other moneys from him for living wit...

    Vincent’s Answer

    Likely not unless he was performing some activity of your behalf and could be construed as acting as your agent.

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  • How much is a half sister {estranged} entitled to after a wrongful death suit has been settled

    They were not close and did have a very strained relationship

    Vincent’s Answer

    Under the Wrongful Death Act in Illinois, the next-of-kin are entitled to the proceeds of any recovery. Next-of-kin are determined by looking at the laws of intestate succession and who would be entitled to proceeds of the estate had the decedent passed without a will. Once next-of-kin are determined, the court has to determine percentages of dependency of the various next-of-kin based upon the evidence presented.

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  • Assault and battery

    If someone plead guilty, can you sue them for medical bills, loss wages, and pain and suffering? How do you start that process? And up to how much?

    Vincent’s Answer

    You can pursue a civil claim against the offender. A practical problem may arise in terms of whether the offender is covered by some form of liability insurance that may cover your damages. Oftentimes, insurance policies exclude coverage for intentional acts. Whoever you hire to represent you should also explore whether the offender was intoxicated and, if so, whether a claim under the Dram Shop Act may exist if the offender had been drinking at a bar prior to the attack.

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  • My son was a passenger in a auto accident and the persons insurance isn't enough to cover all bills and loss wages. The driver

    got a DUI. My son tested not drunk. He was air lifted and in the hospital 3 days and has been off work since August. Could we go after the bar in a case like this. THere were other people in the accident and 2 of them was also air lifted. The vehi...

    Vincent’s Answer

    In addition to the claim against the bar or bars where the driver was drinking, there may be an uninsured or underinsured claim under your son's or your policy of motor vehicle insurance. if the operator of the vehicle was not driving with the permission of the owner, Progressive may deny coverage. You would then need to explore the possibility of an uninsured claim. It could not hurt to notify the insurance company that insures your motor vehicles of the incident. I would avoid signing anything or letting your son give a recorded statement until you consult with an attorney. Feel free to call if you have any other questions.

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  • Left Turn On Yellow

    I was making a left turn on yellow(one car in front of me made left on yellow), then a car coming straight hit rear end on passenger side, then my car hit the pole and driver side rear is completely damaged. It was a big intersection and I almost ...

    Vincent’s Answer

    Who is ultimately at fault (it could be more than one driver) will depend on the versions given by each driver, any eyewitness statements and the timing of the signals at the intersection. In most states, a left turning vehicle has an obligation to yield to oncoming traffic. On the other hand, the oncoming vehicle likely had an obligation to reduce speed as he approached the intersection, to keep a proper lookout and to stop for a red light. If not done already, the incident should be reported to the police. If this were a case where each driver had a green light, the left turning vehicle would likely bear most of the fault.

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