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Robert Jeffrey Long
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Robert Long’s Answers

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  • My fathers grave needs a head stone and the cemetery isn't cooperating. If i take actions in my own hands..will I get in trouble

    My father passed away 2 years ago. Mt family always had very little money and all our savings went for his funeral arrangements. The cemetery wanted to charge us over $1000 for a stone, we cant afford that. They gave us the option to buy a cheaper...

    Robert’s Answer

    Yes, the cemetery has rules and often those rules cause expense. Happens everywhere all the time. The rules are in the contract or deed or other written document generally, but if it's a Catholic cemetery, the rules may not be in writing or could be essentially unviewable. It's probably nothing more than a trespass to plant your own headstone, but if they notice it, they'll likely just dig it up and throw it away.

    You really don't have an option that's going to let you keep the headstone you bought in place unless you can work it out with the cemetery management. If you do talk to them, remember that they get their rules and orders from well above them in the hierarchy, so be pleasant or you'll get absolutely nowhere. I can't think of anything a lawyer could do to help you in this situation. Good luck.

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  • Will a non-violent felony conviction from over 20 years ago keep me from getting an illinois liquor licence in my name ?

    need to know !

    Robert’s Answer

    It's quite possible that it may. The state law disqualifies people who have had felonies, even from long ago and in non-violent settings unless the applicant can successfully demonstrate complete rehabilitation. That's a high standard, of course. Even if one gets a state license, the local authority could still deny one based on the felony and on a looser concept of you're not being of a "good moral character". If you're really going to try and go this route, you're going to need an attorney to help you put forth your substantial efforts at rehabilitation and help you prove you deserve the license. The burden is on you, but the road's daunting. Good luck.

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  • Do I have a case for malpractice or failure to diagnose?

    I was referred to a specialist for work on my knee. I was unable to make an appointment with the doctor and saw her PA. Another PA intern gave the first shot and after I was in an enormous amount of pain. I complained continuously about the pai...

    Robert’s Answer

    What you described isn't enough to pursue a claim. It costs tens of thousands of dollars to prosecute a malpractice case, and that means that only the most seriously injured people have a large enough claim to warrant it. It's unfair because it means that substandard care is most often left un-redressed, but that's the system we have. Sorry we can't be much help in this instance.

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  • Once a house has been put up for sale with a realter, can the seller /owner back out of the deal?

    Wondering if a owner can back out from selling the house. Supposely there are 2 bids but nothing has been done and the real estate has had the house on market since 010113 but nothing has been done, now the owner wants to forget about selling and...

    Robert’s Answer

    If there's no contract for the actual sale of the house, and all you're trying to do is get out from a listing agreement, yes. The contract technically may continue to run its course, but you're under no obligation to actually sell the house and if you tell the broker you're taking it off the market, they usually comply. Just don't do this as a ruse to hire a different broker, as that will land you in the land of claims and lawsuits. You may wish to have a lawyer review any cancellation agreement and advise you of your rights and any limitations that might apply. Good luck.

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  • What legal rights do I have in Illinois if a camera was installed in my home without my knowledge but nothing was recorded?

    Found a hidden camera in my bedroom that can transmit video and audio but police found that nothing was recorded and that the camera (when they found it) could not transmit. I think Illinois law says that you cannot record or transmit without cons...

    Robert’s Answer

    You can certainly sue him for trespass and invading your privacy unless he had some right you're not telling us about to enter your bedroom. What you're describing is really pretty creepy and I would suggest some extreme caution in dealing with this entire situation. It may be better in the long run to gain distance from him rather than continuing to engage in contact with him by filing suit. Better talk to a local lawyer and lay out all the facts then think carefully through your options. Good luck.

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  • Am I responsible for my neighbors property along the ally?

    We run a food pantry and it is accessed by pulling down the ally. My neighbor complained that the cars that go past his property have cut off the edge of his yard making it hard to mow. Other vehicles travel through the ally also. I pointed out t...

    Robert’s Answer

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    It's not easy to answer without seeing a picture or a plat. If it's a publicly owned alley, then he really has no basis to complain about traffic using it. If it's privately owned, he might have something to complain about. Even if it's privately owned, many times those alleys are governed by some sort of written and recorded easement agreement that spells out some rights and responsibilities. Before you spend more money fixing the roadway or time in dealing with your neighbor, you should gather up as much information as you have about the title to your property and the alley and bring it in to a local lawyer knowledgeable about land use and title issues. Hopefully you'll find someone who'll consider what you're doing and show some charity toward the fees. Good luck, and keep doing the right thing to help the needy.

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  • I don't know what category this falls under, I can't find on one that says "I did a stupid thing."

    I found a used car for my 18 year old son, so he could go to work and school. We had to finance it. I could have gotten it on my own, but the dealer told me that if I put his name on as co-buyer, it would also help build credit for him. When we we...

    Robert’s Answer

    The only problem with the other response is that your son would have to sign the title over in order to sell the car legally. There are practical solutions to that problem, but they're not legal and it's not worth a felony forgery charge to get rid of your slug of a kid. I'd take the tires off it, chain them up with a heavy-duty lock and prevent the use of the vehicle. You have the right to do that as an owner of the car. If the kid complains, and he will, tell him to cough up some dough or sign the title. A little coercive, but within the bounds of the law. And, it's time for him to move out. Good luck.

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  • Can I rent an apartment with no job,good credit? boyfriend also would move in with me and he makes the money but he is illegal

    I have good credit but am not working and currently dont have any income i have money saved. my boyfriend is providing for our son, our unborn daughter and myself currently but the problem is he is illegal he has a good steady job and gets paid we...

    Robert’s Answer

    The only possibly legal question you're asking is what happens if ICE comes and grabs your boyfriend or if it makes it impossible for him to work. In either event, you'll probably end up evicted and owing money. Harsh truth, but relationships with illegal immigrants raise risks that the rest of us would shudder at. It would be a good idea to at least talk to an immigration attorney to see if your boyfriend has any options. Good luck.

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  • Can court jurisdiction be lost if a debtor signed an arbitration rider in his foreclosure documents?

    The Lender pursued me in court, but I have some formidable counter-claims. Is it legally possible for the Lender to evade my claims by later asserting an arbitration clause in hopes of limiting any damages (I have mortgage foreclosure fraud, atte...

    Robert’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    Maybe, maybe not. You'd have to show all the documents to a competent lawyer and get a thorough analysis. Some arbitration clauses can be waived if not timely asserted, others might be void because they violate a protected right under state law and others are completely enforceable. You're not going to get a definitive answer in an on-line forum, I'm afraid. Good luck.

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  • Can I sue The Local 241 Union for failure to represent my grievance case and withdrawal of a discharge that shouldn't been withd

    I was never informed about what had been submitted on my behalf! When I constantly contacted the union rep so I could fill out the grievance form with the correct information and was never allowed the opportunity to do that!

    Robert’s Answer

    No. The choice to help you with a grievance is a protected discretionary act on the union's part.

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