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Christian Glen Sullivan

Christian Sullivan’s Answers

34 total

  • I share joint custody and have to relocate.. how does this work?

    I currently share joint custody with my ex husband in MN. I have to relocate to MD to be with my new husband. Can I get full custody of my children and take them with me? We are both good parents to the children. Do we allow the children ages ...

    Christian’s Answer

    It is possible to relocate with the children, but it will involve the courts. In Minnesota, after an order has been established laying out custody and parenting time, you need to either obtain agreement from the non-custodial parent OR obtain a court order granting you the right to relocate with them.

    As part of the new agreement, you can then outline the proposed school year/summer visit arrangement. With the distance being a factor, you will also want to ensure you cover off on how travel arrangements will be made, who pays, etc.

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  • Can i move out of the state of MN?

    I have sole physical custody and joint legal custody of my two kids. our order implies the father is to visit with our children 3 days out of the week at our discretion. He has never upheld that order. I've came up with schedule after schedule to ...

    Christian’s Answer

    In addition to the answer provided by Mr. Kaman, Minnesota also allows a custodial parent to move out of state if the non-custodial parent agrees.

    This is a prime situation in which it makes sense to consult with a local attorney about your options.

    Good Luck

    DISCLAIMER This answer is provided solely for informational purposes only. This answer does not constitute legal advice, create an attorney-client relationship, or constitute attorney advertising.

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  • My neighbors tree fell on my fence and damged it. It fell because of the age of the tree. Is my neighbor responsible?

    None

    Christian’s Answer

    Issues like these relating to fallen trees are very fact specific and without more information I can't tell you definitively what the outcome may be. As you may already know, the condition of the tree is just a factor that is considered in cases like these.

    For instance - was the the tree visibly in poor shape? Cracks, hanging limbs, etc. prior to the fall? If so, the owner of the tree may be responsible for the damage caused under the "hazard" tree concept. The tree owner may also be responsible for any clean up that is on your property.

    Good Luck

    DISCLAIMER This answer is provided solely for informational purposes only. This answer does not constitute legal advice, create an attorney-client relationship, or constitute attorney advertising.

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  • This question is about me being a beneficiary to a friend's met life policy how can they change it without paperwork?

    My friend passed away about a month ago and I was to be her beneficiary to 100k and when I called met life to tell them that she passed on they told me that they closed the account that I was on and transferred the account to another one and that ...

    Christian’s Answer

    I agree with Mr. Lively. Something doesn't appear to be right with what you are describing.

    Did Met Life tell you when this transfer occurred? It may be that the change had happened some time ago. If you still feel that something isn't adding up, I urge you to seek out a local attorney to help you determine what may have become of the insurance policy.

    Good Luck

    DISCLAIMER This answer is provided solely for informational purposes only. This answer does not constitute legal advice, create an attorney-client relationship, or constitute attorney advertising.

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  • What can I do?

    My stepmother is trying to make me pay half of my fathers funeral bill with a Life ins policy that I was the beneficiary. she told me I either pay half or give back a vehicle that was gifted to me. My dad has no assets to pay any bills, she signe...

    Christian’s Answer

    This sounds like a difficult spot to be in.

    From a legal perspective, you are not obligated to use the proceeds of the life insurance to pay for funeral expenses. Also, if the car was gifted as you say, then it is yours and you are not required to return it for funeral expenses.

    Is there some underlying issues between you and your step-mother? It sounds like either she is in a financial bind or just being vindictive. If the latter, then disregard her request for payment. If the the former, see what you can do to accomodate her.

    Good Luck

    DISCLAIMER This answer is provided solely for informational purposes only. This answer does not constitute legal advice, create an attorney-client relationship, or constitute attorney advertising.

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  • Can children of deceased parents collect on old insurance policies?

    My mother-in-law died in 2000. A year later, her 94 yo husb remarried a 45 yo woman. He died in 2002. We recently found 3 life ins policies still unclaimed under the mother-in-laws name. The children would like to claim these policies. Is there ...

    Christian’s Answer

    It really depends on who was the beneficiary at the time of the mother-in-law's passing. Life insurance proceeds are paid to the named beneficiary on the policy. If the children were named as primary beneficiaries, then those policies can be claimed by the children.

    To make a claim, contact the insurance company to determine what procedure they may require. Usually, it is a claim form and a death certificate.

    Good Luck

    DISCLAIMER This answer is provided solely for informational purposes only. This answer does not constitute legal advice, create an attorney-client relationship, or constitute attorney advertising.

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  • I just got my first D.A.R. but i didnt even know my license was revoked in the first place

    So i got a speeding ticket and minor possession ticket about 2 months ago, and was recently pulled over and given a D.A.R. after doing some research of my own i found out the DMV should have sent me a notice saying that my license was revoked. i n...

    Christian’s Answer

    Link is here

    https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=171.24

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  • I just got my first D.A.R. but i didnt even know my license was revoked in the first place

    So i got a speeding ticket and minor possession ticket about 2 months ago, and was recently pulled over and given a D.A.R. after doing some research of my own i found out the DMV should have sent me a notice saying that my license was revoked. i n...

    Christian’s Answer

    It sounds as if you may not have your address updated with DPS to reflect where you are currently residing. If so, take a look at Minn. Stat. 171.24 subd. (7). linked below. Notice is effective if served personally OR mailed first class to the last known address. It isn't necessary that you actually receive it.

    Good Luck.

    DISCLAIMER This answer is provided solely for informational purposes only. This answer does not constitute legal advice, create an attorney-client relationship, or constitute attorney advertising.

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  • A question about filing a will with the state of Minnesota.

    I have created a will using EZ Legal forms because I wish to bypass the need for probate or lawyers to facilitate disbursement of my belongings. It is ready to be witnessed and want to know if it has to be filed with the county or state in order ...

    Christian’s Answer

    A will does not avoid probate. But a having a will can reduce the cost of probate and the burden to your friends and family. Whether your property needs to go through probate is determined by how that property is titled, not whether you have a will.

    There are also other formalities - such as witnessing - that needs to be adhered to so that the will is valid. If the formalities are adhered to, the will is valid at that time. There is no need to file the will in order to be legal.

    I would suggest you contact a local estate planner to review your will to make sure that you have not made any errors or omissions regarding your wishes.

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  • Divorce or enullment after deportation?

    If deported for bigomy - does the INS consider that the marriage was never legal in the US or is a divorce required?

    Christian’s Answer

    Your question is missing some clarifying facts, but I can provide you some general concepts around bigamy and marriage.

    If, the person deported was married to person A and then married person B without first obtaining a valid divorce from A, then the "marriage" to B is void and is annulled without having to obtain a divorce or other legal proceeding.. It is considered not be valid at any point.

    Hope this helps.

    DISCLAIMER This answer is provided solely for informational purposes only. This answer does not constitute legal advice, create an attorney-client relationship, or constitute attorney advertising.

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