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Jami Sue Oliver

Jami Oliver’s Answers

29 total

  • I had a home relaxer put in and it fried my hair only had it in for 7 minutes it turned my hair into rubber, can you help?

    I had real long hair, my hair came out in clumps it stripped my natural hair color, I had to get all of my hair cut off up to my ears, I have used relaxers before and never had this happen. I have been so humiliated and disgusted by this that it h...

    Jami’s Answer

    Any product that is placed in the stream of commerce and is either defectively manufactured (not the correct chemical composition) or defectively designed (not safe for intended use) can be labeled a defective product in Ohio. In these types of cases, particularly hair-related products, it can be very hard to prove that you followed the directions carefully and that it was not user-error. A lawyer experienced in product defects can figure out whether similar failures and injuries have occurred, whether others have complained, and may even be able to have the product tested if you kept what was left of it. The best thing to do is to find a lawyer who focuses in this type of work and ask for a telephone consultation to see if your case might be compensable.

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  • My husbad was standing on the top stair of a second story deck when the stairs fell away from the deck.

    we then noticed the stairs were nailed to the second styory deck with 3 nails each side only to hold it together. Builder put this up last year--it is at my uncles house . We are so upset with builder--police officer even commented that he did not...

    Jami’s Answer

    Wow, that's horrible. I would contact a premises liability lawyer for sure!

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  • Automobile accident in 2005, I was not at fault, I sustained injuries, went to trial on Feb 7 2011. Lost, whats next can i do ov

    can I get another attorney and resume my case?

    Jami’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    In Ohio, as in most states, the only option you probably have is an appeal. If it is a common pleas court civil case, the appeal time is very short. Unless your prior attorney believes that there was an error made at the trial court level, he or she is probably not willing to appeal a jury verdict. However, if you believe that serious errors were made, you should have it reviewed by a different lawyer who concentrates on personal injury matters. You will most likely need to purchase a transcript of all or part of the trial, too. The bottom line is: consult your lawyer and at least one other lawyer.

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  • Can i sue the club owner for their bouncer picking me up and dropping me head first on the cement?

    I was at a club with 3 friends when another girl at the club bumped into me, no hits were exchanged just words. Out of no where this bouncer thats twice my size picks me up and literally drops me on my head. I Pass out from the injury to my head, ...

    Jami’s Answer

    I have handled many bar premises cases and it does sound as if the bouncer used more than reasonable force to remove you. That being said, you may be entitled to damages. The one thing to be very careful of is whether there is insurance to cover the bar, as many bars have had insurance cancelled because of multiple claims and their liquor licenses are very expensive, making some of these bars not very profitable. On the other hand, if it was a popular and busy club, there is probably coverage. It's just one more issue ot be aware of. I would not speak to anyone at the bar or any investigator until you have met with a lawyer in the area who handles personal injury and premises cases.

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  • Can i sue the club owner for their bouncer picking me up and dropping me head first on the cement?

    I was at a club with 3 friends when another girl at the club bumped into me, no hits were exchanged just words. Out of no where this bouncer thats twice my size picks me up and literally drops me on my head. I Pass out from the injury to my head, ...

    Jami’s Answer

    I have handled many bar premises cases and it does sound as if the bouncer used more than reasonable force to remove you. That being said, you may be entitled to damages. The one thing to be very careful of is whether there is insurance to cover the bar, as many bars have had insurance cancelled because of multiple claims and their liquor licenses are very expensive, making some of these bars not very profitable. On the other hand, if it was a popular and busy club, there is probably coverage. It's just one more issue ot be aware of. I would not speak to anyone at the bar or any investigator until you have met with a lawyer in the area who handles personal injury and premises cases.

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  • I have 3 months left on a 39 month lease and I totalled the car yesterday. What will the insurance company?

    what if I pay the last three payments will the insurance company put me in a new car

    Jami’s Answer

    The insurance company's responsibilities are written in the contract of insurance and otherwise regulated by Ohio law. An insurer is not responsible for paying off a lease, which is why some people choose to purchase "gap" insurance. The insurance carrier is only responsible for giving you the fair market value of the vehicle (which is negotiable and subjective) as well as tax and title on a new vehicle. You may also be entitled to compensation for loss of use and rental car costs, depending on the policy.

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  • Should i get a new lawyer

    i have had a personal injury case for 4 1/2 years. my lawyer is one of those " you don't pay me unless i get money for you " guys. i feel that the case should have been settled by now. i have been trying to contact my lawyer for months but i th...

    Jami’s Answer

    You have a right to get a new lawyer at any point. If you do decide to discharge your lawyer, take a look at whatever agreement that you signed with him. Otherwise, the ethics rules in Ohio would require that the attorney turn your file over to you (no charge for copying) as soon as possible. Your new lawyer will help you deal with issues such as obtaining the file and figuring out whether you are required to pay the first lawyer anything. Generally, if it is a contingency arrangement, then he may not be entitled to anything UNLESS your new lawyer makes a recovery. Having been involved in those situations in the past, it is usually beneficial to have the new lawyer work out a deal, if necessary.

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  • Do I need a lawyer for lead poisoning

    I lived at 368 Robinwood Ave for over 5 years and while living there I was sick all the time, I lost my job, therefore my house was foreclosed on. I moved out June 2010, and now the house is quarantined for lead. It is completely sealed off, with...

    Jami’s Answer

    Yes, I would say call a lawyer immediately. It's a complicated matter so I would suggest sitting down and consulting with someone about all of your options.

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  • Should I file a personal claim?

    In June My rt heel was lacerated by the bottom corner of a door. (public). I stopped the bleeding with 3 bandaids and continued to play pool and have drinks. The bandaids didn't hold so I went to teh ER 3-4 hrs later. The Dr. on duty was tired, cr...

    Jami’s Answer

    I have a slightly different take on the situation. I handle a lot of premises cases. Your drinking had nothing to do with the "accident," and therefore should be kept out of the case, so far as I can estimate. A door should NOT cut a patron. If it does, there is a problem. I would hedge that there have been other situations where people have complained. They may have fixed the door by now, but maybe not, since there was no incident report. Your delay in going to the ER does not bother me as much as it does others, as there would be no evidence that you should have known how serious it was AND you were following the advice of an EMT. The real question is whether there is a medical negligence mixed in there, but if I were reviewing the case I would suggest concentrating on the premises negligence claim in Ohio.

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  • Can an employer hold dress code rules and regulations only to female employees?

    Can an employer who does not have a written handbook hold a meeting with only female employees about dress code expectations and then write a notice about the acceptable/unacceptable attire for women in the office. But not do any of this for men?...

    Jami’s Answer

    Yes, employers can (and quite frankly should) have dress code requirements and some may be gender specific because they have to be. You wouldn't want the employer to force you, as a woman, to dress in a suit and tie, for instance. However, if they start applying performance reviews based upon "unfinished appearance," without defining the term, and apply that term to women and only men, there could be a problem down the line. But just having the dress code is not in itself discriminatory.

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