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Eugenio Hernandez

Eugenio Hernandez’s Answers

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  • Immigration: how many times can i travel abroad when i am a us resident?

    i am a permanent us resident and had to travel outside the states for less than a year at the time (six months at the time) to help the family business that requires my presence. The thing is I definitely do not want to lose my U.S. residency. I ...

    Eugenio’s Answer

    You should take a look at "How Do I" Customer Guides from USCIS at www.uscis.gov.
    These guides answer questions regarding immigration benefits.
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    I Am a Permanent
    Resident
    How Do I…
    Know What My Responsibilities Are?

    Traveling Outside of the United States
    Permanent residence normally permits you to travel outside the
    United States and to return; however, there are some limitations.
    Lengthy absences, particularly if they involve work or taking up
    residence abroad, can lead to abandonment and loss of permanent
    residence status, or delayed eligibility for naturalization. Absence
    for 1 year or more can cause serious problems. Remember that, in
    order to enter another country, you must comply with that country's
    requirements, which may include having your U.S. Permanent
    Resident Card, obtaining a visa, or using your passport from your
    country of nationality.
    You may be able to reduce the risk of abandonment by filing
    for a “reentry permit,” using Form I-131, Application for Travel
    Document, before you depart. Additional information on reentry
    permits is available in customer guide B5, I Am a Permanent
    Resident...How Do I...Get a Reentry Permit?
    Under limited circumstances, you may be able to protect your
    eligibility for naturalization by filing Form N-470, Application to
    Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes, before you depart.
    Criminal convictions can trigger special grounds that make you
    inadmissible, preventing you from being re-admitted to the United
    States after international travel.

    See question