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Corrine Anne Bylund

Corrine Bylund’s Answers

6 total

  • Can a child be removed by dcf if they have removed one of your kids before

    i had a child removed and lost my rights by dcf..im remarried and pregnant.the lady that currently has that child is tryin to report me with this child.when i give birth can dcf come and take this baby from my home.i have adequate housing clothing...

    Corrine’s Answer

    You should consult with an attorney as soon as possible to protect your rights to your unborn baby. If the DCF finds evidence of abuse, abandonment or neglect, they may remove your child from your home. Unfortunately, in a subsequent action, the fact that your parental rights were terminated to your older child, can be used as evidence that it is in the best interest of your child, in the instant matter, that your rights be terminated.

    THIS ANSWER IS NOT FORMAL LEGAL ADVICE. It is provided for your information based on your AVVO Inquiry. Formal legal advice can be provided after consultation with an attorney. Answering your question does not create an attorney-client relationship or require further consultation.

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  • How long does she have to file domestic violence charges against me if none were filed the nite of complaint?

    I live with my girlfriend. We were drunk. We were arguing. She tripped hit her head and called 911 saying I pushed her. Cops took pics of my ripped shirt and her scratch marks on my neck and chest. Cops took me away from house releasing me to a ...

    Corrine’s Answer

    There is no time limit, however, the older the incident gets, the less likely it is that your girlfriend has a reasonable fear of imminent harm. In order to have her petition for injunction granted, she must prove that she has a reasonable harm of imminent danger. If she moves back in with you and files for an injunction based on this altercation the next time she gets mad at you, it isn't likely that the court will believe she has a reasonable fear.

    You should contact an attorney of your choosing immediately if you are served with a temporary injunction. Although the injunction process is designed to be friendly to pro se litigants, injunctions are very serious and the advice of a professional is well worth it.

    THIS ANSWER IS NOT FORMAL LEGAL ADVICE. It is provided for your information based on your AVVO Inquiry. Formal legal advice can be provided after consultation with an attorney. Answering your question does not create an attorney-client relationship or require further consultation.

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  • Can a judge make someone take a lie detector test?

    my son was accused of child abuse which he did not do. This is a blended family with problems. His children said they were abused and her children said they weren't. For some reason the State isn't even listening to her children. his son said t...

    Corrine’s Answer

    Polygraph examination results are generally inadmissible unless all parties, including your son's attorney, agree to its admissibility. Strategically, it might be a good idea for your son's attorney to hire a polygraph examiner on his own and for your son to submit to the examination. If the results are in the favor of your son, his attorney can present them to opposing counsel and the court and they will be admitted if everyone agrees. If the results are bad, they are protected under the attorney work product privilege and do not have to be disclosed. Polygraph examination is very controversial. Experienced examiners will say that it is more likely for someone to have a false positive (meaning it will look like they are lying when they are not) than it is to get a false negative (meaning they somehow beat the polygraph examination).

    It sounds like your son's lawyer has given sound advice in recommending that your son not agree to a mutually agreed or court appointed polygraph examiner. Your son should, however, consider hiring his own examiner (through his attorney) in an attempt to exonerate himself.

    THIS ANSWER IS NOT FORMAL LEGAL ADVICE. It is provided for your information based on your AVVO Inquiry. Formal legal advice can be provided after consultation with an attorney. Answering your question does not create an attorney-client relationship or require further consultation.

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  • 50/50 asset division

    Florida is a 50-50 state as come to divorce. My husband has IRA, 401K and his company stocks. He only gave me his IRA, but refused the 401 K and the stocks. We have married for 18 years. ON the mediation, my lawyer told me that he has the righ...

    Corrine’s Answer

    In Florida, mediated settlement agreements are generally upheld. The lack of advice from an attorney, or even the lack of an attorney is not a reason for a mediated agreement to be set aside. However, for a settlement agreement to be upheld it must be entered into freely, voluntarily, knowingly and with fair financial disclosure. You might be able to argue that you didn't enter into the agreement knowingly.

    For clarification, the court starts out with a presumption that marital assets should be divided equally. However, there are factors the court can consider to give more assets to one party. Also, you should consider whether any portion of your husband's retirement accounts were nonmarital, meaning earned prior to your marriage or after the filing of your petition.

    Further, if your husband is already retiring and drawing on the accounts, you can either have alimony based on that income to your husband or you can have one half of the marital portion of the accounts, not both.

    You should seek a second opinion regarding the validity of your mediated agreement.

    THIS ANSWER IS NOT FORMAL LEGAL ADVICE. It is provided for your information based on your AVVO Inquiry. Formal legal advice can be provided after consultation with an attorney. Answering your question does not create an attorney-client relationship or require further consultation.

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  • My kids live with the father and im trying to get them back

    my kids live with the father and im trying to get them back

    Corrine’s Answer

    Are you going through a divorce? Is there an Order giving the father custody? Please contact an attorney so that you can discuss your situation and get legal advice that is appropriate to your situation.

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  • How can I dispute a restraining order that's being placed on me by my boyfriend. I cant afford a lawyer.

    My boyfriend of 3 years has placed a restraining order on me. Court is in 4 days. I want to dispute his claims against me. I cant afford a lawyer. His allegations are mostly false and way over exaggerated. I want to protect my rights.

    Corrine’s Answer

    • Selected as best answer

    The best advice I can give is to get an attorney. Since your question is very general, I can only give you general information. Restraining Order/Injunction cases are very fact based and really come down to whether your Judge feels that your boyfriend has a reasonable belief that you will do harm to him. Make sure you have thought through the events your boyfriend refers to in his petition so that you can communicate clearly to the court. If there are any witnesses, you should talk to them about testifying on your behalf.

    Your boyfriend will get to tell his side first and you will get your turn to respond.

    Dress appropriately. Behave appropriately. Do not make faces at your boyfriend. Do not make noises when/if he lies. Keep your composure. Be respectful to the Judge and all the courthouse staff.

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