Skip to main content
Warren Raymond Hinds

Warren Hinds’s Answers

14 total


  • How can i get my money back from a lawyer who will not answer his phone or return phone calls?

    he suppose to get my grand child legitimted and set up vistitation

    Warren’s Answer

    You likely have lost confidence in this lawyer completing the work. However, if you want to give him/her one last chance, call the Georgia State Bar @ 404-527-8720 and ask for the "Consumer Assistance Program." After you explain the total lack of communication, they will attempt to contact the attorney on your behalf. Sometimes when a lawyer gets a message from "the State Bar," it serves as a wake-up call and prompts them to act.

    See question 
  • After reading my additional details, would you suggest for me to get a lawyer for my case?

    I am 20 years old and in school for Nursing Anesthesiology. I recently got into trouble and got arrested as a misdemeanor. In Georgia, if I plead first offenders, what are the chances the court will accept this and also since I will be in nursing ...

    Warren’s Answer

    In addition to what the others have said, it is important to remember that the licensing board will not treat all misdemeanors the same.

    See question 
  • My husband and I own a business. He committed adultery.

    My husband and I own a business. He committed adultery, I have filed for divorce. He has shut me out of the business and closed it. He then opened another business using all assets from the first business. Judge has ordered hm to pay temporary ali...

    Warren’s Answer

    Although I agree with a prior response that you should discuss the matter with your present counsel, Georgia's Bar Rules do not preclude you from obtaining a "second opinion.". In fact, the FAQ section under the Ethics heading on the State Bar of Georgia's website addresses this very question, as follows:

    6. A woman came to my office for help with her divorce case, but there is another lawyer representing her now. May I speak with her? Yes, unless you currently represent someone whose interests are adverse to hers. Rule 4.2 does not prohibit a disinterested lawyer from providing a second opinion to someone who is currently represented by counsel.

    See question 
  • Can I be a lawyer?

    I have a class 2 misdemeanor on my record - No Driver's License. I plan on going to law school. What does this mean for me?

    Warren’s Answer

    As long as it is fully disclosed, it should not pose a problem for law school or Bar admittance.

    See question 
  • Who do you report a bad lawyer to

    talk to jennifer rister

    Warren’s Answer

    Contact the Arkansas Supreme Court's Committee on Professional Conduct at 1-800-506-6631.

    See question 
  • After withdrawing from your case how long does an attorney have

    to return your file?

    Warren’s Answer

    When withdrawing from representation, a lawyer must take steps to the extent reasonably practicable to protect the client's interests, including returning the file timely to avoid prejudice to the client. What is reasonable would depend on the status of the case, size of the file, etc. I would suggest that you put the request in writing with a date certain for compliance (10-14 days) and if no reply, call the State Bar's Consumer Assistance Program at 404-527-8720.

    See question 
  • Arrested vs. Charged vs. Convicted for Law School Applications

    Of course I see the irony in this situation, but I am working towards a career in law and have had a bit of a checkered past with respect to it. My application is very strong, with the exception of these issues: (1) At 16, I was arrested for p...

    Warren’s Answer

    I believe that all of these incidents need to be disclosed. When it comes time to take the Bar exam, any misrepresentations or omissions on your Bar OR Law School application, actual or perceived, can derail your admittance to the Bar. When there are problems from the past, passage of time and ability to show rehabilitation are extremely important.

    See question 
  • If I have a judgment againts an individual, how do I get them to pay if they still say the aren't.

    I took Him to court and got a judgment, and he has no job and still refuses to pay.

    Warren’s Answer

    Unfortunately, if the person has no assets or employment, your situation may fall under the commonly used phrase: "the judgment is worth no more than the paper it is written on." In Georgia, a judgment is good for seven years, and can be renewed for another term. If the judgment debtor has a bank account, obtains employment, or is owed money by someone else, you can file a garnishment action against the debtor's bank and/or creditor. If the debtor owns real estate, you can record the judgment in the county of the property and you will have a lien on the real property (although any prior mortgage or lien will have priority). There is also a way to levy personal property owned by the debtor, but you would likely need legal counsel.

    See question 
  • What is the time limitation in GA for a slip & fall case?

    I fell in a chain restaurant in July 2008 and broke my arm and elbow and banged up my knee. (I slipped on butter on the floor - manager pointed out the butter). Restaurant manager said they would pay all medical bills. Their insurance company a...

    Warren’s Answer

    The statute of limitation for personal injury claims in Georgia is generally two years. OCGA section 9-3-33. Thus, unless an exception applies (e.g. Disability, minor, fraud, waiver), you may be time-barred.

    See question 
  • How do we recover money stolen by a lawyer??

    A lawyer stole my settlement. I filled a grievance with the bar. I have been getting the run around ever since. The insurance company for the law firm was suppose to pay me back. The Bar association has not helped me. I don't trust nor do I f...

    Warren’s Answer

    In Georgia, claims for legal malpractice are subject to a four year statute of limitations, that runs from the date of the negligent act. You may also have additional claims against this attorney if they are not time-barred. Unfortunately, there may be some problems with the lawyer's malpractice coverage for your claim.
    In situations where a lawyer steals a client's money, the State Bar has a client recovery fund that provides compensation on a discretionary basis. However, before you can recover from the fund, you must exhaust all efforts at recovering in a civil suit, and also must pursue a grievance to suspension or disbarment of the lawyer. You should not delay in retaining competent counsel to assist you in this matter.

    See question