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Fred William DeVore IV

Fred DeVore’s Answers

2 total

  • How do you become the executor of an unmarried deceased relative's estate?

    A relative dies without anyone named as a trustee.

    Fred’s Answer

    The first question you must answer is: Did the relative have a valid Will? If the relative did leave a valid Will, then he/she most likely appointed an executor to administer his/her estate. If the relative did not leave a Will, then you can apply to the court to administer the estate and you would become the administrator, not the executor of the estate (executor is a term used only for administering an estate with a valid Will). See my legal guide (which refers to North Carolina, but gives you an idea of the process): Estate Administration: Qualifying as an Administrator. Probate rules differ from county to county and state to state, so if your relatived died without a Will I would recommend contacting a lawyer in Kentucky to help guide you through the sometimes arduous process of administering an estate.

    Disclaimer: Please note that this answer does not constitute legal advice. It is merely intended to provide general information to aid the poster in finding answers to the problem posed. This answer does not create an attorney-client relationship. In most cases, it is best to contact an attorney directly to find answers to your problems.

    NOTE: If you find this response helpful, please click on the “thumbs up” button at the bottom.

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  • I have a lease on some hunting land and want some people that are not on the lease out what can i do?

    I had a lease on some hunting land and its been sold and now im getting a new lease from new owner and i dont want some new people that just started hunting on this land that what can i do? lease is in my name only.

    Fred’s Answer

    Did you enter into a written lease agreement with the new owner? The language in your lease agreement should help you understand many of your rights as a lessee. Do you have no trespassing signs on your land, or have you made these hunters aware that they do not have permission to enter your property? If you have done this, then generally speaking, as a lessee of land in NC, you might have an action for trespass to land because you are a "real party in interest." Another question you need to focus on when deciding whether or not to pursue a claim is what damages have resulted from their trespass? If you do not have any civil damages, you may decide to involve local authorities and let the State pursue this matter criminally.

    Disclaimer: Please note that this answer does not constitute legal advice. It is merely intended to provide general information to aid the poster in finding answers to the problem posed. This answer does not create an attorney-client relationship. In most cases, it is best to contact an attorney directly to find answers to your problems.

    NOTE: If you find this response helpful, please click on the “thumbs up” button at the bottom.

    See question