Helen Louise Parsonage’s Answers

Helen Louise Parsonage

Winston-salem Immigration Attorney.

Contributor Level 10
  1. Filing taxes as "married but filing separately" will affect my immigration process?

    Answered about 2 months ago.

    1. David Nabow Soloway
    2. Helen Louise Parsonage
    3. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    4. F. J. Capriotti III
    5. Cynthia Beth Rosenberg
    6. ···
    7 lawyer answers

    There is no requirement that you file jointly any more than there is for United States citizens. I have assisted clients with this type of issue and provide USCIS with documentation of the percentage of married couples who do not commingle their finances. It has not been a problem in the past and if the marriage otherwise satisfies USCIS that it is genuine, you should not have one either.

    6 lawyers agreed with this answer

  2. Pending application means Out of Status?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Alexander Joseph Segal
    2. Helen Louise Parsonage
    3. John Grayson Davidson
    3 lawyer answers

    It's not easy to answer this question, as you don't provide quite enough information. I highly recommend you have a qualified immigration attorney review your case quickly, as the appeal time is very short.

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

  3. I-130 petition

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Alexander Joseph Segal
    2. Helen Louise Parsonage
    3. F. J. Capriotti III
    3 lawyer answers

    As the parent of a USC, your mother is an immediate relative and has no derivative beneficiaries. Your sister will need her own, separate I-130.

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

  4. Who fills out a form I 864 Affidavit of support for immigration? Would it be my wife, who is the U.S citizen and/or my sponsor?

    Answered about 2 months ago.

    1. Helen Louise Parsonage
    2. Andrew John Bartlett
    3. William J Quirk
    4. Christian Schmidt
    4 lawyer answers

    Your question is not completely clear. If your wife petitioned you for permanent residency she is required to complete an I-864 regardless of income, or lack of it. If her income is not sufficient to meet the requirements listed on Form I-184P, then you will need a separate cosponsor, who will complete their own I-864. Hope this answers your question. If not, or you are still not sure, I recommend you contact an immigration lawyer.

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

  5. What if my original sponsor (my husband) doesn't have any incomes and not filled taxes in the past three years?

    Answered about 2 months ago.

    1. Helen Louise Parsonage
    2. Alexander M. Ivakhnenko
    3. Mary Carmen Remigio Madrid-Crost
    3 lawyer answers

    Even though your husband has no income, as the petitioner he is required to file an I-864. If he is unemployed say so, and if his income for the last three years was $0, that's what you put. Seems silly, but there you go. If you have more questions, I recommend you get the help of an immigration attorney to respond to the USCIS letter, as you only get one chance to fix the issue they have raised.

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

  6. I HAVE VERY COMPLICATED IMMIGRATION CASE ABOUT GREEN CARD REMOVAL PROCEDURE ANYONE CAN HELP ME PLEASE. THANKS

    Answered about 2 months ago.

    1. Anthony Meleika Aboseif
    2. Giacomo Jacques Behar
    3. Grace E. Chisholm
    4. Helen Louise Parsonage
    5. Lawrence M. Kasen
    6. ···
    7 lawyer answers

    Without knowing why you are removal proceedings, it is hard to answer your question here, and you probably shouldn't post details in a public forum like this. I join my colleagues in recommending you contact a local immigration attorney experienced in removal work. I wish you every success in your case.

    5 lawyers agreed with this answer

  7. How important is having a Mortgage House in marriage as a evidence during "good faith" Waiver case after divorce?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Carlos Andres Lopez
    2. J Charles Ferrari
    3. Helen Louise Parsonage
    4. Anu Gupta
    4 lawyer answers

    Evidence of a joint mortgage on your home is just one example of the many different things you can use to show that their was a genuine marriage at the beginning. I strongly recommend you contact a qualified immigration attorney to assist you.

    2 lawyers agreed with this answer

  8. Hello , I reciently got my green card can I file for my mom who in living in the USA for 20 yrs now ?

    Answered about 2 months ago.

    1. Robin Dalton
    2. Christina Joan Murdoch
    3. Adan G. Vega
    4. Helen Louise Parsonage
    5. Alexus Paul Sham
    6. ···
    6 lawyer answers

    Unfortunately, permanent residents are not eligible to file for parents. You will have to wait until you become a United States citizen.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  9. My last attorney ( I am no longer retaining) has posted information about my case on her website and included the actually civil

    Answered about 2 months ago.

    1. Eric Edward Rothstein
    2. Stephen Richard Markman
    3. Helen Louise Parsonage
    4. Elan E. Weinreb
    4 lawyer answers

    I agree with the earlier responses, but she should not be using your photo without your permission. If she does not respond, I think it appropriate to contact the State Bar for assistance. I would never post a clients photograph without permission.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  10. Are you a legal citizen if you pass your test & sign your divorce papers before the oath is taken.

    Answered about 2 months ago.

    1. Helen Louise Parsonage
    2. Nicole Prebeck
    3. Alexander Joseph Segal
    4. Harun Iqbal Kazmi
    5. Marina Shepelsky
    5 lawyer answers

    If your wife obtained citizenship based upon 3 years of permanent residency rather than the 5 years normally required, then this may be an issue. The law requires that she be married to the same person she is using to qualify under the 3 year rule at the time she becomes a citizen. She would have to disclose the divorce at the swearing in ceremony. She should contact an immigration attorney.

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

We're ready to help. Contact us today.

336-724-2828