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Alice Elaine dansker Doyle

Alice Doyle’s Answers

8 total

  • If we have to continue support how long can she gets this from us. How can we fight this? We haven't seen him in 3 yrs.

    My fiance pays child support on a 18 yr old that he never gets to see because the mother would not let the child and now he doesn't know us or want to have anything to do with us. He turned 18 2 weeks ago and we just got a letter from child suppor...

    Alice’s Answer

    Regarding the lack of contact, it is unclear as to why your fiance hasn't seen his son for three years, regardless of what the mother says. You also do not say if your fiance has ever attempted to enforce the Order regarding access. Regarding the child support, is the attorney taking both of you or just your fiance? I ask that because you said "she is taking us to court . . ." I suggest you seek local counsel. Since your fiance hasn't seen his son for three years, he likely does not have more definition related to "the autism spectrum" as applied to your son and that would make a big difference in whether he can or cannot take care of himself. An attorney could do the appropriate research and ask the right questions. You can do that also however, given the lack of communication, it might be a challenging conversation that may take too long given that you have already received the letter. I wish you all the best as you navigate through this.

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  • What are my options in this situation? Can I just sign my rights over? Can I claim him without permission?

    I have a 5 year old son with a woman that has full custody of the child. She lives roughly 3 hours from me. I was court ordered to pay $653 a month in child support in September 2014 and it comes directly out of my paychecks. She is court ordered ...

    Alice’s Answer

    There are several “pieces” to your question. Breaking it down, you are asking about parenting time (aka visitation) issues, a child support modification based on a reduction in income, your relationship with your son, the tax deduction, abdicating your parental rights and status, and, although specifically part of your question, your “status” as a registered sex offender. Because your situation sounds a bit complex, I suggest contacting an attorney in your area and allowing that person to address the issues with a more global perspective instead of considering them separately. First, if your income has been reduced through no fault of your own, you may be able to petition the Court for a reduction, however, you will need to have proof of your new income and the reason for the reduction (so it isn’t considered voluntary impoverishment). You can ask the Court to consider the deduction considering her income level and your contribution. IRS rules will govern as well and you said she has full custody. However, you also say that other people “claim” your son, and if she isn’t going to claim him, there would be an argument for you claiming him. Regarding transportation, if she won’t talk about it, and you want to go by the Order, you can petition the Court to enforce the Agreement, however, there is always the possibility that the Court will change the transportation based on circumstances. I’m curious as to who your son thinks you are since you talk about visiting but you also say that he does not know you are his father. And regarding the sex offender issue, are there any restrictions on your access? I won’t comment on this part because that may or may not have any impact on your time with your son, but there is not enough information. However, that does not mean he should not know you are his father. But again, I don’t have the background so I won’t say anything further on that issue. Regarding singing over your rights, although I suppose it could happen, I think it is highly unlikely because you are the father, you have legal financial responsibility, and public policy would dictate otherwise. It sounds like your issues are with your child's mother, not with your child, so I suggest you think strongly about this and the affects on your son of doing so or even suggesting it I have tried to address your issues. It is impossible to comment further in this limited information arena. I suggest arranging a consultation with local counsel to more fully discuss your options. Your son is young and you have a lot of years left to co-parent so it would be wise to begin discussions and resolutions. I wish you all the best in your efforts toward resolution.

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  • What will be the outcome for a father that has abandoned a child since birth then two years later file for visitation

    Father failed to establish a relationship with child for two long whole years now he wanna step into the child's life and the child don't know him

    Alice’s Answer

    Your inquiry doesn't provide the reason for the two-year long absence. The reason for the long stretch will likely have an impact on the answer. If it is on the order of a lack of interest or some other voluntary factor, it will still be necessary to show why it is not in the best interests of your child to get to know his father now, and to develop a relationship. Or is it based on an involuntary reason such as incarceration or the father did not know he was your child's father? I suggest a consultation with counsel to discuss more of the chronology and relevant issues before moving forward to get a more complete answer to your inquiry as there are a variety of reasons for the Father's alleged failure to establish a relationship, as well as creative and child-based ways to work toward establishing the relationship now.

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  • Can my ex's attorney prohibit that I speak Russian to my bi-lingual son when he's w/Dad, if the court order doesn't prohibit it?

    My ex & I are divorced, sharing custody of 4yo.I am bi-lingual & so is our son,who loves speaking Russian to me. My ex is against us speaking Russian when my son is with him. My son is out of town with his Dad. I was contacted by ex's attorney...

    Alice’s Answer

    As Mr. Mulinazzi said, the short answer is "no." Your ex's attorney does not hage the right to order constraints not addressed/prohibited by court. I'm interested to know if you have an attorney, and if so, does the other attorney know that? If so, the communication should be with your lawyer, not directly with you. It may be helpful to learn the basis of the objection to see if there is a way to respond to the interest/goal behind the demand in case it is something you hadn't considered. I also suggest consultation with your lawyer (if you are represented) or arranging a consultation with counsel to address this issue. You may need to seek Court direction for this issue to put it to rest and stop the tension your son is most likely experiencing with the situation as you described it.

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  • If you were married to a registered sex offender and now divorced from him is he allowed to have overnight stays with your

    minor aged granddaughters who are not even biologically his? The way he has access is because my daughter, who is not his daughter wants to remain in a relationship with him. He basically has been financially supporting her I believe in order to g...

    Alice’s Answer

    Based only on the limit information in your inquiry, I saw a big red flag in front of my face. In some ways it's dangerous to answer questions with limited information because there is often more to the "story." However, in this case, we know there's (a) a registered sex offender, b) minor children and c) a mom who may be placing financial support over her daughters' safety and well-being. Not a good combination. I advise you to contact your daughter and let her know you take this very seriously and call a) your ex-husband's probation or parole officer (if he has one) and CPS. This is a potentially dangerous situation, and one that shouldn't wait for action. I also advise you to contact counsel and set up a consultation to find out how to deal with the situation in the event you need to intervene through the courts.

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  • Do u think my friend really needs a lawyer?

    My friend's wife filed complaint for absolute divorce on March 25. Previously his wife filed for divorce in March 2012 on grounds of adultery but that was dismissed & closed due to her having no proof of adultery. However she did get child suppor...

    Alice’s Answer

    This is an interesting question because the answer is really a sound "maybe." I say that because technically your friend doesn't actually need a lawyer. He can represent himself and, as previously responded, find the domestic relations forms online. The challenge is that so often people don't get a lawyer because they believe the case is/was "simple", only to find out when they get to court that there was something they didn't think about (because they aren't a lawyer) and then they realize the folly of the decision not to get a consultation first at the very least. So, even though anyone can proceed on their own, I strongly advise against it. The law is so intricate and there are rules to which your friend will be held that he may not understand or know. Often times in the attempt to save fees, people spend more in the long run because of unintended consequences that legal advice and retention will help to avoid. If funds are the issue, and if your friend qualifies, there are resources available for representation at low or no cost.

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  • I am the defendent in a uncontested/absolute divorce case in MD, do I need to show up for the Masters Hearing?

    We have no children or property between us. When the police officer served me my paperwork he said I'm done, I dont even have to show up for the court case if I didnt want to. I really do not feel like seeing my husband/ex and neither one of us is...

    Alice’s Answer

    As the Defendant you do not need to appear in an uncontested case, however you may want to go appear anyway to ensure all issues are covered and there are no surprises. My response assumes that you Answered the Complaint admitting all claims, that an executed agreement (by both you and the Plaintiff) was attached to the Complaint and it (the agreement) covered all issues, and that there are no open issues. If you are represented, follow counsel's advice as to whether to appear.

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  • Extortion in Maryland divorce case

    My father and mother went to mediation. He was spewing demands that were insane and she did not agree. A month after mediation his lawyer sent my Mothers lawyer a letter that stating that he liquidated his IRA and if she did not agree to his deman...

    Alice’s Answer

    It is not extortion. Your inquiry is challenging to answer in more detail since we do not know what exactly was said in the mediation. Did your mother perhaps say something that sounded like an agreement on any terms (even if she did not intend it that way)? Were your parents' lawyers present and is there a disagreement between them as to whether there was or was not an agreement regarding the IRA? Assuming your mother did not agree to a term that would provoke an IRA liquidation, the next step may be a filing for an injunction to prevent further movement (liquidation, spending or otherwise) of marital assets pending final disposition. As a caveat, I nor any other lawyer is able to say with certainty whether any action in your questions is/are "wrong" because we do not have all the facts. Her lawyer is most familiar with the facts of her case and she should contact him or her immediately to try to ensure that nothing happens with the money before this can be resolved. I also want to say that it is unfortunate that you are caught in between your parents in their divorce.

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