First of all, here's the same review I wrote for LawyerRatingz.com:

Dean Collins had originally represented me in a DUI case that took two years to come infront of a judge. Upon cowering in the presence of said judge, Dean Collins turned to jelly. He fumbled over his words, completely contradicted himself, and ultimately got me thrown in jail for 8 days until a new lawyer could be found. During the two year period it had taken my case to come to fruition, I had since graduated college, and established myself in a lucrative, productive career. Dean Collins advised me not to bring any of this up infront of the judge because, according to him, it was trivial. Ultimately, I found out later that it would have been a good idea to bring up these points infact, and prove that I've been able to move on. As I sat in the bullpen, Dean Collins could only come up with a lame excuse to try and save his own dignity. He said to me, "That judge is crazy! You saw how he treated me!" Yeah, well I'm the one sitting in jail.

Other than that (since I have more space here), Dean Collins constantly acted as if he was friends with everyone at the courthouse. Somehow, this helped him imagine that he could easily get me out of my dilemma . . . which turned out to be false. Not only did no one I dealt with from any of the departments at the courthouse seem to give Dean Collins any time of day whatsoever, but he also came off toward me, his own client, as consistently cranky and disagreeable. I'll be honest here when I say that Dean Collins did not seem to even like me very much. He made it quite clear by showing little eye contact, hardly any interest in my concerns, and constant agitation with any question I ever had. He was also quite patronizing, and encouraged me to stay out of it, keeping me in the dark for the most part. His attitude basically stated to me, "leave these matters to the grown-ups." Instead of actually fighting for me, took the easy way out with a plea bargain that was based on imaginary connections that he clearly did not have. He spent most of our days in court, standing around the back room, waiting for someone to talk to him, but rarely accomplished anything.