Michael Bruce Greenstein’s Answers

Michael Bruce Greenstein

Pittsburgh Child Custody Lawyer.

Contributor Level 12
  1. My Daughter spends all the child support money and her mom doesn't want it.

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Michael Bruce Greenstein
    2. Charles Anthony Rick
    3. Deborah A. L. Iwanyshyn
    4. Virginia Giselle Alvarez
    4 lawyer answers

    Effectively, your daughter's mother has chosen to give her an allowance in the amount of what you are paying. Unless you are legally entitled to have your support obligation recalculated because there has been a material and substantial change in circumstances since the current order went into effect, you are stuck with the situation as it is. In Pennsylvania, there is no accountability for how child support money is spent. It goes into the custodial parent's household, and that's the end of...

    Selected as best answer

  2. Is there anyway to not let the father of my children see them?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Michael Bruce Greenstein
    2. Scott L Levine
    3. Randi Joy Silverman
    4. Julie Rebecca Colton
    4 lawyer answers

    The only way you can close the door against the father is if he cooperates by failing to assert his rights as a parent. There is no "pay to play" rule, because child custody law focuses on the rights of children, not the rights of parents. Assuming that he is determined to participate in the raising of his children, you have no more power to keep him from them than he has to do the same thing to you. Attorney Michael B. Greenstein Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Selected as best answer

  3. What can I do about my ex always being late to drop off our child on holidays?

    Answered 9 months ago.

    1. Michael Bruce Greenstein
    2. Kathryn L. Hilbush
    3. Tracy Marie Sheffer
    3 lawyer answers

    The first thing you should consider doing is to pick your battles. As frustrating as the day-to-day experience with him may be, you always have to ask yourself, "What could a judge do to fix this?" In many instances, the answer is a frustrating "not much." Judges hate to be called on to micro-manage a situation, particularly as it is not really possible to do so. This becomes especially important given that no judge is going to want to do what he or she sees as punishing your child for her...

    4 lawyers agreed with this answer

  4. Divorce and taxes

    Answered 10 months ago.

    1. Michael Bruce Greenstein
    2. Scott P. Tene'
    3. Robb Adam Longman
    4. James D. Wade
    4 lawyer answers

    Filing for divorce, by itself, will have no tax consequences for you; you are just as married the day after you file for divorce, as you were on your wedding day. Only the actual divorce decree that dissolves your marriage will affect your filing status for tax purposes, as the prior respondent correctly pointed out. You should speak to a professional tax-preparer if you are unsure which filing status offers you the best financial advantage, but your separation from your husband and filing...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  5. Can someone get custody of a child when they have unfounded abuse charges against them?

    Answered over 2 years ago.

    1. Michael Bruce Greenstein
    2. Justin C. Gearty Jr.
    2 lawyer answers

    If the other grandparents came up clean from the investigation, there is no more barrier than if someone is arrested and then found not guilty. For purposes of this answer I will assume that there is no further involvement by Children and Youth, and that the other grandparents are filing a standard custody action. I will also assume that your grandson's parents are not in the picture at all at this point, since you do not mention them. Knowing only as much about your situation as you were...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

    1 person marked this answer as helpful

  6. Can I ignore 3301-D ?

    Answered about 2 years ago.

    1. Michael Bruce Greenstein
    2. Julie Rebecca Colton
    3. Charles Anthony Rick
    3 lawyer answers

    The thing that makes 3301(d) (the "Irretrievable Breakdown" ground for divorce) different from 3301(c) ("Mutual Consent") is that if you do nothing, your divorce process can still move forward. Proceeding under 3301(d) when there are no economic claims filed can quickly put you in a situation where you are at imminent risk of losing the right to make those claims. If claims are filed, your husband can force you to address them (or, if he is playing "fast and loose," pretend that they have...

    Selected as best answer

  7. An engagement is cancelled because the groom misrepresented himself, does he still get the ring back?

    Answered over 3 years ago.

    1. Michael Bruce Greenstein
    2. Pamela Koslyn
    2 lawyer answers

    Ordinarily, an engagement ring is viewed as a gift given in consideration of marriage; it becomes the sole and separate property of the bride on the day of the wedding. Under ordinary circumstances (which these are not!) I would advise the bride-no-longer-to-be to return the ring if she is the one breaking off the engagement. Given that this particular instance involves fraud, and that the fraud is (arguably) the proximate cause of your breaking off the engagement, I think you have an...

    Selected as best answer

  8. How do I amend a pro se divorce filing from mutual consent to two year separations?

    Answered 10 months ago.

    1. Kathryn L. Hilbush
    2. Michael Bruce Greenstein
    3. David Alexander Browde
    3 lawyer answers

    If you used the right form for your Divorce Complaint, you may not need to amend at all. Without a review of the paperwork you filed I cannot say for sure, but if your Complaint says, "Complaint under Section 3301(c) or 3301(d) of the Divorce Code," odds are you don't have a problem. 3301(c) refers to the Mutual Consent ground, and 3301(d) refers to the Irretrievable Breakdown ground. If the Complaint has the correct content, all you need to do is use the additional forms associated with the...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  9. Divorce

    Answered 10 months ago.

    1. Kathryn L. Hilbush
    2. Lidia L. Alperovich
    3. Michael Bruce Greenstein
    4. Jeanne B. Costopoulos
    4 lawyer answers

    It might help you to understand that when two people get married, from that day until the day of their final separation there is not so much a "you and yours" or "me and mine" as there is a "we and ours," and it doesn't matter what name an asset is held in so that it fits the definition of "marital property" under the Pennsylvania Divorce Code. A prior response says, correctly, that nothing is automatic. In fact, if you were to finalize a divorce without either claiming court-ordered...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

  10. Breach in divorce agreement. Ex now deceased. Is the divorce decree still binding?

    Answered over 1 year ago.

    1. Michael Bruce Greenstein
    2. Faith Marie Lucchesi
    3. Randi Joy Silverman
    4. Julie Rebecca Colton
    4 lawyer answers

    The answer may depend heavily on what the contract says. Look for a provision in the contract that declares it to be binding upon heirs and assigns. If the agreement was professionally drafted, it is almost certainly there, amidst the "boilerplate." While my practice focuses on family law matters rather than estate matters, I think you should definitely explore further. My "gut" inclination would to try to keep the matter in family court by seeking to join your ex-husband's executor as an...

    3 lawyers agreed with this answer

Call now for a free consultation.

412-371-4500