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L. Maxwell Taylor

L. Maxwell Taylor’s Answers

6,124 total


  • My company is forcing removal of Confederate flag from my tool box, will not force removal of a rainbow flag. Discriminatory?

    I will be disciplined for not removing a Confederate flag sticker from my tool box (that co-worker complained about as being "offensive") but they will NOT force the removal of rainbow flags which I find to be offensive as a symbol of hatred and i...

    L. Maxwell’s Answer

    I see no valid grounds which a court would sustain for a claim of employment discrimination.

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  • What is a law judge I've heard about criminal, administrative, and etc. but I don't know what that means

    I've heard of them all but I don't know what they mean I really want to know what a law judge is

    L. Maxwell’s Answer

    A judge who presides over criminal prosecutions or civil cases is a member of the judicial branch of government. A judge who presides over administrative hearings, such as in unemployment or worker's compensation cases, is an "administrative law judge" and is an official with the executive branch of government.

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  • What can a man do to cause the outcome to be no fault when human resources is investigating a sexual harassment case?

    A man was accused of taking inappropriate pics of an 18 year old girl, the girl had no proof, but had one witness who also had no proof. This happened at work, they worked as painters at the university. The girl was a student and was therefore a s...

    L. Maxwell’s Answer

    Witnesses, including one who is accused, have no power to control the outcome of a work-related investigation. The outcome of an investigation turns on the evidence, including witness accounts, that the investigators hired by employer or employer's counsel collect, and the credibility the employer accords the witnesses.

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  • Can Lawyers charge you for items that are not on original invoices!

    hired a lawyer saved all my invoices and now they are trying to charge me for stuff that are not on the original invoices. I have tired calling to get answers and get rushed off the I have emailed the lawyer twice and still haven't got a response....

    L. Maxwell’s Answer

    It's hard to know what you're complaining about because you don't say. Basically lawyers write in their retainer agreements what they are going to charge you for. Typically it's for all time spent on a case, plus mileage, photocopies, process server fees, filing fees, stenographer's fees, deposition transcripts, postage, etc. What doesn't show up on one bill shows up on the next. If you have a question about what you are being charged for, ask your lawyer.

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  • I was a patient that took Gabapentin 600 3 times a day. I lost strength ability to walk memory lose headaches mood swings I was

    Confused I was sucidial clumsy.

    L. Maxwell’s Answer

    You don't ask a question, so I am forced to imagine one. The problem is there are many questions I can imagine. Basically, you say you took a drug, which caused certain adverse effects. Presumably you were prescribed the drug by a licensed physician, who adjudged benefits in your particular case would outweigh its drawbacks. Who are we to question that without much more information? For what condition were you prescribed to this drug? Were there any contraindications in your known medical history that should have prevented your physician from prescribing this drug? Did you suffer permanent harm caused by the drug? Would you have suffered worse harm had you not been medicated with this drug? These are some of the questions which come to mind when I read the spare fact pattern you have written above.

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  • I am 19 years old and I want my girlfriend to move in with me without her parents permission! She is 17 years old!

    She is a senior student and she turns 18 in 3 months! We want to know whats the best way to solve this issue without anyone being harmed in any ways? We live in Miami Florida! Please help!

    L. Maxwell’s Answer

    Legal adults are free to do as they like, but minors are not. Three months passes in the blink of an eye. Restraint in the present may avoid problems in the future.

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  • What happens now

    I sold a daysailer sailboat. The guy paided for it in full and said he'd be back in a week or two. It's been 4 months and no sign of him. I don't have his number or his address. All I know is his first name. What happens now? Do I re sell? because...

    L. Maxwell’s Answer

    The link below may provide some guidance.

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  • Fired from my job because my employer dislikes my potential future goals and aspirations. Do i have a wrongful termination case?

    I worked for a florida construction contractor and my boss fired me off the assumption that I had aspirations of starting my own construction company one day. I was never given any sort of written or verbal warnings and never at any time did i fee...

    L. Maxwell’s Answer

    I see nothing in your account which would give rise to a legal claim for wrongful termination, applying general principles of law. Generally speaking, an employer may fire an at-will employee whom employer suspects may want to start a competing business, even if employer is wrong in its belief.

    Not legal advice as I don't practice law in Florida or hold Florida licensure. Consult Florida counsel to tame legal advice you can rely on. I practice in Vermont ONLY.

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  • I am 61 years old. If I take money our of my IRA how much taxes would I have to pay

    I need to withdraw $15,000.00 from my IRA to pay for some medical bills and other debts I have. How much would I be taxed on this amoung

    L. Maxwell’s Answer

    A person who is older than 59 1/2 may take distributions from his or her IRA without penalty. The distributions will be subject to income tax, however. Medical expenses which exceed 10% of adjusted gross income may be deducted on Schedule A if you itemize deductions.

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  • How long do I have to live in Vermont to be considered a resident for the purposes of changing my name?

    I'd like to change my name. I move frequently for work. How long must I remain a resident after I file a petition to change my name?

    L. Maxwell’s Answer

    The name change statute is found at 15 V.S.A. sections 811-186. It does not specify minimum residency either before or after. As a general principle of law, where no other rule of statutory or case law applies, domicile is established by physical presence and an intent to remain. So if you are domiciled in Vermont, you may file an application to change your name in accordance with the procedures set forth in the name change statute.

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