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The Judge Keeps Saying Overruled And Sustained, What Does That Mean?

So you are at trial and you hear the lawyer say objection, and after some discussion with the lawyers, the judge says sustained. Or you year the judge say overruled. Do you want to know what those two terms mean in a Maryland trial?

If you have had a chance to watch our trial video on what does objection mean in a trial, you know that when a lawyer says objection, he or she is asking the judge not to admit something into evidence. When a judge overrules an objection, essentially the person making the challenge or objection has lost on that particular issue.

For example, if an attorney asks a question and right before the witness has a chance to respond, the other attorney objects, and the judge overrules the objection, the witness can go ahead and answer the question he or she was just asked. On the other hand, if an objection is sustained, then that means that the objecting party has won on that issue.

So in the example I just gave, if the objection is sustained then that means that the witness cannot answer the question. If you have questions about a possible Maryland medical malpractice case, or trial matter, and you would like to speak to someone about it, pick up the phone and give me a call. I can be reached at 301-850-4832. If email works better send me an email at medicalinjury "at" bostonlawllc.com (Remember to replace the "at" with @). We answer questions like yours all the time and we would be glad to hear your story.

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