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Q: What are the factors for exceptional and extremely unusual hardship evaluation?

A: Some of the factors that may be considered in evaluating whether deportation would result in exceptional and extremely unusual hardship to the alien’s qualified relatives (U.S. citizens or Green Card Holders) are:

· The age, number, and immigration status of the alien's qualified children and their ability to speak the native language and to adjust to life in the country of return;

· The health condition of the alien's qualified children, spouse, or parents and the availability of any required medical treatment in the country to which the alien would be returned;

· The alien's ability to obtain employment in the country to which the alien would be returned;

· The impact of a disruption of educational opportunities to the alien's qualified relatives;

· The current political and economic conditions in the country to which the alien would be returned; Note: General allegations of economic and emotional hardship are insufficient

· Family and other ties to the country to which the alien would be returned;

· Values, contributions to and ties to a community in the United States, including the degree of integration into society;

· Other evidence attesting to a good character including but not limited to affidavits from family, friends, and responsible community representatives

· Immigration history, including authorized residence in the United States;

· The availability of other means of adjusting to permanent resident status;

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