Skip to main content

Personal injury statute of limitations by state

The deadline to file a claim after an injury, or statute of limitations, depends on the type of injury and the state where it occurred. If you’ve been injured and want to sue, you must file a claim within your state’s statute of limitations.

If you’re concerned that your injury does not fall within your state’s statute of limitations, consult a local personal injury lawyer. Some exceptions to this include wrongful death, if you were a minor at the time of the injury, or if you did not become aware of the injury until the statute of limitations had passed.

Statutes of limitations vary by type of injury:

Personal injury statutes of limitations by state
NegligenceDefamationAssault & batteryMedical malpractice
Alabama

2 years

2 years

2 years

2 to 4 years

Alaska

2 years

2 years

2 years

2 years

Arizona

2 years

1 year

1 year

2 years

Arkansas

3 years

1 or 3 years

1 year

3 years

California

2 years

1 year

1 to 2 years

1 to 3 years

Colorado

2 years

1 years

1 year

2 years

Connecticut

2 years

2 years

3 years

2 to 3 years

Delaware

2 years

2 years

2 years

2 years

Florida

4 years

2 years

4 years

2 to 4 years

Georgia

2 years

1 year

2 years

2 years

Hawaii

2 years

2 years

2 years

2 to 6 years

Idaho

2 years

2 years

2 years

2 years

Illinois

2 years

1 year

2 years

2 years

Indiana

2 years

2 years

2 years

2 years

Iowa

2 years

2 years

2 years

2 years

Kansas

2 years

1 year

1 year

2 years

Kentucky

1 year

1 year

1 year

1 year

Louisiana

1 year

1 year

1 year

1 year

Maine

6 years

2 years

2 years

3 years

Maryland

3 years

1 year

1 year

3 to 5 years

Massachusetts

3 years

3 years

3 years

3 years

Michigan

3 years

1 year

2 years

2 years

Minnesota

2 years

2 years

2 years

4 years

Mississippi

3 years

1 year

1 year

2 to 7 years

Missouri

5 years

2 years

2 years

2 to 10 years

Montana

3 years

2 years

2 years

3 years

Nebraska

4 years

1 year

1 year

2 years

Nevada

2 years

2 years

2 years

2 to 4 years

New Hampshire

3 years

3 years

3 years

3 years

New Jersey

2 years

1 years

1 years

2 years

New Mexico

3 years

3 years

3 years

3 years

New York

3 years

1 year

1 year

2.5 years

North Carolina

3 years

1 year

3 years

3 to 10 years

North Dakota

2 years

2 years

2 years

2 years

Ohio

2 years

1 year

1 year

1 to 4 years

Oklahoma

2 years

1 year

1 year

2 years

Oregon

2 years

1 year

2 years

2 years

Pennsylvania

2 years

1 year

2 years

2 years

Rhode Island

3 years

1 or 3 years

3 years

3 years

South Carolina

3 years

2 years

3 years

3 years

South Dakota

3 years

2 years

2 years

2 years

Tennessee

1 year

6 months or 1 year

1 year

1 year

Texas

2 years

1 year

2 years

2 years

Utah

4 years

1 year

1 year

2 years

Vermont

3 years

3 years

3 years

3 years

Virginia

2 years

1 year

2 years

2 to 10 years

Washington

3 years

2 years

2 years

3 years

West Virginia

2 years

1 year

2 years

2 years

Wisconsin

3 years

3 years

3 years

3 years

Wyoming

4 years

1 year

1 year

2 years

Avvo personal injury email series

Sign up to receive a 3-part series of useful information and advice about personal injury law.

Recommended articles about Personal injury

Can’t find what you’re looking for?


Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer