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Ohio Workers’ Comp – Amputations, Loss of Use, Facial Disfigurement

Ohio Workers’ Comp – Amputations, Loss of Use, Facial Disfigurement

The Ohio BWC compensates injured workers for amputation injuries, loss of use awards, loss of vision, loss of hearing, and facial disfigurement. In the case of such disabling work injuries, representation by a Board Certified Ohio Workers’ Compensation Specialist Attorney should be obtained. Currently, the Ohio Work Comp System is highly litigated and an unrepresented work injury victim just can’t go it alone and expect all of the compensation benefits and medical care available.

To learn more about Amputation and Loss awards, check out our website link.

The Compensation Rate for Amputation and Loss of Use Awards changes each year. Check the rate for any year of injury here.

The Ohio Workers’ Compensation Amputation, Loss of Use, Loss of Hearing, Loss of Vision, and Facial Disfigurement Compensation Code follows:

The Ohio Workers’ Compensation (OhioBWC) Hand / Finger Amputation Chart can obtained by clicking this link Hand Amputation Diagram Chart – Form C-196

For the loss of a thumb, sixty weeks.

For the loss of a first finger, commonly called index finger, thirty-five weeks.

For the loss of a second finger, thirty weeks.

For the loss of a third finger, twenty weeks.

For the loss of a fourth finger, commonly known as the little finger, fifteen weeks.

The loss of a second, or distal, phalange of the thumb is considered equal to the loss of one half of such thumb; the loss of more than one half of such thumb is considered equal to the loss of the whole thumb.

The loss of the third, or distal, phalange of any finger is considered equal to the loss of one-third of the finger.

The loss of the middle, or second, phalange of any finger is considered equal to the loss of two-thirds of the finger.

The loss of more than the middle and distal phalanges of any finger is considered equal to the loss of the whole finger. In no case shall the amount received for more than one finger exceed the amount provided in this schedule for the loss of a hand.

For the loss of the metacarpal bone (bones of the palm) for the corresponding thumb, or fingers, add ten weeks to the number of weeks under this division.

For ankylosis (total stiffness of) or contractures (due to scars or injuries) which makes any of the fingers, thumbs, or parts of either useless, the same number of weeks apply to the members or parts thereof as given for the loss thereof.

If the claimant has suffered the loss of two or more fingers by amputation or ankylosis and the nature of his employment in the course of which the claimant was working at the time of the injury or occupational disease is such that the handicap or disability resulting from the loss of fingers, or loss of use of fingers, exceeds the normal handicap or disability resulting from the loss of fingers, or loss of use of fingers, the administrator may take that fact into consideration and increase the award of compensation accordingly, but the award made shall not exceed the amount of compensation for loss of a hand.

For the loss of a hand, one hundred seventy-five weeks.

For the loss of an arm, two hundred twenty-five weeks.

The Ohio Workers’ Compensation (OhioBWC) Foot / Toe Amputation Chart can obtained by clicking this link Toe / Foot Amputation Diagram C-197 Form

For the loss of a great toe, thirty weeks.

For the loss of one of the toes other than the great toe, ten weeks.

The loss of more than two-thirds of any toe is considered equal to the loss of the whole toe.

The loss of less than two-thirds of any toe is considered no loss, except as to the great toe; the loss of the great toe up to the interphalangeal joint is co-equal to the loss of one-half of the great toe; the loss of the great toe beyond the interphalangeal joint is considered equal to the loss of the whole great toe.

For the loss of a foot, one hundred fifty weeks.

For the loss of a leg, two hundred weeks.

For the loss of the sight of an eye, one hundred twenty-five weeks.

For the permanent partial loss of sight of an eye, the portion of one hundred twenty-five weeks as the administrator in each case determines, based upon the percentage of vision actually lost as a result of the injury or occupational disease, but, in no case shall an award of compensation be made for less than twenty-five per cent loss of uncorrected vision. “Loss of uncorrected vision" means the percentage of vision actually lost as the result of the injury or occupational disease.

For the permanent and total loss of hearing of one ear, twenty-five weeks; but in no case shall an award of compensation be made for less than permanent and total loss of hearing of one ear.

For the permanent and total loss of hearing, one hundred twenty-five weeks; but, except pursuant to the next preceding paragraph, in no case shall an award of compensation be made for less than permanent and total loss of hearing.

In case an injury or occupational disease results in serious facial or head disfigurement which either impairs or may in the future impair the opportunities to secure or retain employment, the administrator shall make an award of compensation as it deems proper and equitable, in view of the nature of the disfigurement, and not to exceed the sum of five thousand dollars. For the purpose of making the award, it is not material whether the employee is gainfully employed in any occupation or trade at the time of the administrator’s determination.

Gruhin & Gruhin has been representing victims of Ohio work amputation injuries for years. In addition to obtaining the maximum dollar award for the injury, Mike Gruhin and his team analyze each amputation claim for additional compensation, including amputations that occur due to a Violation of Specific Safety Rule (VSSR Claim), unsafe work condition, and the additional depression overlay that often accompanies an Ohio work amputation injury.

Download Mike’s Free Guide – The Ohio Workers’ Compensation Manual. At no charge, you can read about the Ohio Workers’ Compensation System. If you would like a free, no obligation consultation, please call Gruhin & Gruhinor send us an inquiry email.

© 2012, Gruhin & Gruhin Attorney's. All rights reserved.

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