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How does the state of Washington legally define a father?

Legal Definition of ‘Father’ Rev. Code §§ 26.26.011; 26.26.116

The term ‘parent-child relationship’ means the legal relationship between a child and a parent of the child.

The term includes the mother-child relationship and the father-child relationship.

The term ‘acknowledged father’ means a man who has established a father-child relationship under §§ 26.26.300 through 26.26.375.

The term ‘adjudicated father’ means a man who has been adjudicated by a court of competent jurisdiction to be the father of a child.

The term ‘alleged father’ means a man who alleges himself to be, or is alleged to be, the genetic father or a possible genetic father of a child but whose paternity has not been determined. The term does not include:

• A presumed father

• A man whose parental rights have been terminated or declared not to exist

• A male donor

The term ‘presumed father’ means a man who, under § 26.26.116, is recognized to be the father of a child until that status is rebutted or confirmed in a judicial proceeding. A man is presumed to be the father of a child if:

• He and the mother of the child are married to each other, and the child is born during the marriage.

• He and the mother of the child were married to each other, and the child is born within 300 days after the marriage is terminated.

• Before the birth of the child, he and the mother of the child married each other, even if the attempted marriage is or could be declared invalid, and the child is born during the invalid marriage or within 300 days after its termination.

• After the birth of the child, he and the mother of the child have married each other, whether or not the marriage is or could be declared invalid, and he voluntarily asserted his paternity of the child, and:

The assertion is in a record filed with the State Registrar of Vital Statistics. He agreed to be and is named as the child’s father on the child’s birth certificate. He promised in a record to support the child as his own.

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