Skip to main content

Five Legal Considerations for Your Farmer’s Market Business

New businesses are flocking to Vermont farmer’s markets. From soap-making to prepared foods and traditional farm produce stands, today’s farmer’s market is the best micro-enterprise incubator.

Farmer’s markets are ready-made storefronts for your goods or products. You can sell your products and build a customer base with little upfront capital. Farmer’s market businesses (“market businesses”) generally benefit from low or non-existent rents, regulatory and permit exclusions, and inexpensive start up costs. Opening your business in a farmer’s market lowers your initial costs and risk of failure significantly, while at the same time providing a trial run for your business strategy.

Market businesses are, however, still businesses in the eyes of the law and the tax authorities. Being small will not shield you from certain legal obligations and risks. Business owners must make sure that they address several fundamental legal issues when starting up and operating a farmer’s market business.

Five important legal issues to consider:

Farmer’s markets are ready-made storefronts for your goods or products. You can sell your products and

Additional resources provided by the author

Article Disclaimer: The contents of this Article are intended for general informational purposes only and are not intended for specific application to any particular set of facts and circumstances. This Article is not a substitute for legal counsel on any particular matter.

Rate this guide


Recommended articles about Employment

Can’t find what you’re looking for?


Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer