LEGAL GUIDE
Written by attorney Ann Massey Badmus | Apr 15, 2013

E-Verify For Employees FAQ (Part 1): Why Did I Receive A Tentative Nonconfirmation (TNC)?

We recently published a post titled “E-Verify For Employees: Know Your Rights" that outlined some important general information about your rights, and the responsibilities of employers, when it comes to E-Verify. In this first of a five-part series, we will highlight specific Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s) provided by United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) as they relate to employee rights and E-Verify.

Why Did I Received A Tentative Nonconfirmation (TNC)?

A Tentative Nonconfirmation (TNC) from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) or Social Security Administration (SSA) means that the information on your I-9 form that your employer entered into E-Verify did not match DHS or SSA records. A TNC does not mean that you are not authorized to work in the United States.

A TNC from the DHS may occur if:

  • Your name, A-number, and/or I-94 number was recorded incorrectly in DHS records.
  • Your U.S. Passport, Passport Card, driver’s license or state ID card information could not be verified.
  • Your information was not updated in DHS records at the time your information was checked in E-Verify.
  • Your citizenship or immigration status changed.
  • There is another type of error on your DHS record.
  • Your employer did not submit your information correctly to E-Verify.
  • The name you provided on your Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, is not consistent with your name in DHS records.

An TNC from the SSA may occur if:

  • Your citizenship or immigration status changed since you last received your Social Security number.
  • You changed your name but did not report the change to SSA.
  • Your name, Social Security number or date of birth was recorded incorrectly in SSA records.
  • There is another type of mismatch with your SSA record.
  • Your employer did not enter your information correctly in E-Verify.
  • The name you provided on your Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, is not consistent with your name in SSA records.

Your employer must inform you if you received a TNC. In our next post in this series we will discuss your options should you receive a TNC.

Additional resources provided by the author

If you're a foreign medical graduate who wishes to practice medicine anywhere in the United States, the Badmus Law Firm can help you navigate the often complicated immigration process. You are invited to contact us at (469) 916-7900 or at [email protected]

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