LEGAL GUIDE
Written by attorney Jon Martinez | Sep 18, 2011

Arizona Weapons Crimes

What is a weapons crime in Arizona?

A weapons crime is any criminal act involving the use, sale, possession or distribution of a weapon. Weapons crimes in Phoenix can be serious felony offenses and you will need an attorney who is not afraid to fight the government in order to protect your rights and keep you out of jail. Some examples of weapons crimes include:

  • Unlawful discharge of a weapon
  • Misconduct involving weapons
  • Unlawful possession of a weapon
  • Minor in possession of a weapon
  • Concealing a weapon
  • Unlawful sale of a weapon
  • Assault with a weapon
  • Using a weapon to commit a crime

Weapon crimes in Arizona are most often classified as a felony offense. As a felony offense, you may be facing extreme penalties, including fines, probation or even jail and prison time. For example, if you have previously been convicted of a felony offense, it is illegal to carry a weapon unless you have had your civil rights restored. If you are charged with possessing a weapon with one prior felony conviction, you may be facing a maximum of 7.5 years in prison.

Similarly, if you are charged with using a weapon in the commission of another crime, such as drug trafficking or sales, the penalties can be extremely harsh. Prosecutors will use every resource available to secure a conviction against you that may require mandatory prison terms. Having a defense attorney who is well versed in weapons crimes in Phoenix can help you through these stressful times and they may be able to keep you out of a prison cell.

Do I need to be using a gun or a knife to be charged with a weapons crime?

It is not necessary that a gun or knife be used for you to be charged with a weapons crime. In fact, in Arizona, a weapon is defined as anything designed for lethal use. This can include guns and knives, but may also include other objects such as a baseball bat, a beer bottle, or even a car.

Any weapon charge that results in the serious injury of another person will automatically be considered a more serious crime that will carry significantly harsher punishments and much longer prison sentences.

Additional resources provided by the author

Jon M. Martinez Attorney at Law Jon M. Martinez Criminal Law Group 40 North Central Avenue, Suite 1400 Phoenix, Arizona 85004 (480) 745-1572 [email protected]

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